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Everyday Hero Profile: Aaron Delahoussaye

Posted on Fri, Sep 18, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Aaron Delahoussaye, Driver at Lynden Oilfield Services in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

Name: Aaron DelahoussayeEveryday Hero Aaron Delahoussaye

Company: Lynden Oilfield Services

Title: Driver

On the job since: 1996

Superpower: Getting it done

Hometown: Palmer, AK

Favorite movie: Original Star Wars

Bucket list destination: Europe

For fun: Traveling with my wife

How did you start your career at Lynden?
I started my career at 22 as a warehouseman at Lynden Transport in Anchorage. I worked on the dock as I worked toward earning my Commercial Driver's License (CDL). I transferred to Prudhoe Bay in 2012 and was part of the transition to Lynden Oilfield Services (LOIL) in 2015. I am now a driver and haul everything from bulk chemicals to oversized freight on any given day.

What is a typical day like for you?
There is no typical day in Prudhoe Bay – every day is different. Everyone up here can pretty much do everything. That's what I like about it. You don't get stuck in the same routine. My co-workers have nicknamed me the horse as in "work horse."

I was part of the Doyon drill rig move of 'the beast' from Canada to Alaska and have hauled a lot of drill rig components over the years.

What has been most challenging in your career?
The most challenging is probably being away from home and family for two weeks or more at a time. You miss out on a few things along the way. Although we have a regular two-week-on, two-week-off schedule, I've been away as long as six weeks for special projects.

Weather is also a challenge. Winters bring visibility issues, freezing temps and wind that suddenly comes out of nowhere. We have our winter gear to protect against frostbite and below-freezing temperatures, but it can be tough at times. One specific story that comes to mind is when we first started running the PistenBullys. We had one operator at LOIL and the other was a contracted operator that helped us with our first three trips to Barrow, AK. The contractor left the Slope because we thought our season was over when we got a call for two more loads. I was very new to operating the machines, but I followed the other driver on a 530-mile roundtrip across the Arctic Slope from Deadhorse to Atqasuk to Barrow and back to Deadhorse. We were on the trail for four days and made record time without any issues.

What do you like best about your job?
I love the challenges. From the freight to the conditions to the time schedules, every day is different. I'm always learning. Up here you get to be the teacher and the student every single day.

The animals we see around Prudhoe Bay also make the job unique. Since we are up on the coast at the very top of Alaska, we have had polar bears, grizzly bears, caribou and other wildlife come into the yard looking for food. Swans and geese come up in the summer to have their babies on the lake, then migrate south for the winter.

What are you most proud of in your career?
I'm most proud of my longevity with the company. To be able to say you've spent almost your entire working career with one company says something about you and the company.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I've been married to my beautiful wife Tomara for 22 years. She works for Alaska Airlines as a Flight Attendant. We have two awesome kids, son Kaden and daughter Hannah. They are off to a great start with their careers. So we just became empty nesters and are still trying to figure out what to do with ourselves with no kids in the house. I guess we can do whatever we want!

What was your first job?
My first job was with my grandpa. He owned a log cabin business. We would fly out to these remote locations and build cabins for customers with the challenges of no electricity, getting the building materials to the job sites and dealing with wild animals from time to time.

What would surprise most people about you?
I don't know if this is surprising, but I'm now in my 40s, and I've never broken a bone.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
A. We moved from Alaska to Las Vegas three years ago to be closer to family. Lately I've been working on our backyard, landscaping and hanging out by the pool. We're looking to get an RV and travel around the states. When we still lived in Alaska, I spent time snowmachining, hunting, fishing and skiing at Alyeska.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Lynden International's overnight turnaround for charter of PPE

Posted on Wed, Aug 26, 2020

Lynden International teamThis hearty band of Lynden International employees was ready and waiting for a FedEx charter flight of personal protective equipment (PPE) arriving from China to the Anchorage airport earlier this year. They quickly unloaded five 53-foot containers worth of masks, gowns and other materials and palletized it for next-morning delivery to the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services warehouse. According to Regional Vice President Rick Pollock, most employees were working remotely at the time, but the group immediately responded to the call to action and worked late into the night to get the work done. After the Alaska governor made the request for PPE supplies for Alaska's frontline workers, Lynden worked with FedEx and other partners to coordinate the charter, sourcing suppliers in China and handling customs. "From the first planning call in March to the plane landing in Anchorage, Lynden was with us every step of the way. They are a great partner and we are appreciative of their logistical support during the COVID pandemic response," says Heidi Hedberg, Director of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.

Tags: Lynden International, Lynden employees, Lynden Capabilities

Everyday Hero Profile: Becky MacDonald

Posted on Wed, Aug 19, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Becky MacDonald, Logistics Manager at Lynden Logistics in Seattle, Washington.

Everyday Hero Becky MacDonaldName: Becky MacDonald

Company: Lynden Logistics

Title: Logistics Manager for oil refineries

On the job since: 1985

Superpower: Grace under pressure

Hometown: Vashon Island, WA

Favorite Movie: Remember the Titans

Bucket List Destination: Iceland

For Fun: Baking, travel, beadwork

How did you start your career at Lynden?
In 1985, I was working at Foss Alaska Lines in the rates dept. When Foss sold their assets to Lynden, I came to Alaska Marine Lines with the move. I worked at Alaska Marine Lines for 25 years starting in rates and billing, then moved into several positions, which included Pricing Manager, Customer Service Manager and Intermodal Services. In 2010, I moved to Lynden Logistics and now handle the transportation for five refineries operated by Marathon (formerly Tesoro) and Par Hawaii, along with capital and retail projects for Marathon as they come up for bid.

What is a typical day like for you?
Every day is different, which I really like. I handle every step of a shipment from quoting and pricing shipments to set up, dispatch, tracking, delivery and invoicing. It can be a 10-pound box or a 150,000-pound heat exchanger and anything in between.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Managing three projects at the same time. I work best under pressure and this kept me hopping!

What do you like best about your job?
My customers. I have built great relationships and enjoy working with them.
I've also had the pleasure of working with several Lynden companies on shipments. My shipments may be routed via air, ocean, truck or charter, so it's great to have the knowledge and capability of Lynden employees to work with. Everyone is always willing to help with a One Lynden attitude.

Lynden has been such a great company to work for. After 35 years, I still love my job.

What are you most proud of in your career?
Developing the Intermodal Department at Alaska Marine Lines. It started in 1989 with a customer asking if we could ship a 40-foot container of materials from North Carolina to Wrangell without transload. I worked with Pat Stocklin at Lynden Transport who taught me the process. From then on, Alaska Marine Lines offered the service to household good companies, retail and construction businesses, and it grew from there. We were able to partner with a third-party rail company and move their 53-foot containers through to Alaska which opened the door to more business. Our customers appreciate the door-to-door service. At Alaska Marine Lines, I was taught you don't say no. You say 'I'll look into it and get back to you.'

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I grew up on Vashon Island, WA on the beach. We had to walk down a long trail to our house, or drive in on the beach if we had a lot of stuff to unload. My dad was a 6th grade teacher and we moved to Vashon when I was three years old. I have two older brothers and one younger brother whom I adore. They and their families all live on Vashon, and we are very close. Our parents taught us to work hard, be honest and kind.

Our playground was the beach and the woods. We heated our house with wood so I learned how to chop and stack wood at an early age. We caught fish, crab, octopus and geoduck off our beach, and mom did an amazing job cooking all of it.

1914 Bristol Bay boatGrowing up, we had a 30-foot Bristol Bay boat that was built in 1914 (right). From the time I was 10 until age 17, we spent our summers cruising the Canadian Islands living off the land. I spent many days in the spring working with my dad to get the boat ready for our trip.

We left home two days after school was out and came home three days before school started. Our dogs and cats came with us. My parents continued those trips after us kids grew up.

In high school I played basketball and participated in track as well as managing the boy's varsity baseball team. In my 20s I played softball, basketball and volleyball – and continued playing into my 30s, then began managing and coaching my kids' sports. I was a pitcher, catcher and played third base on three different softball teams.

My daughter Kelly is now 29 and works for Alaska Marine Lines as an account manager in Juneau.

What was your first job?
When I was 18, I went to work for Crowley Maritime as a cook on the tugs. I was one of two women working on the boats at that time. My first outside trip was for four months escorting oil tankers in and out of Valdez, AK. I made several trips to and from Hawaii and Whittier. I asked several times to be sent to Prudhoe Bay on Crowley's annual sea lift but was told it was too long of a trip for a girl. How times have changed!

What would surprise most people about you?
Becky MacDonald with quadI live in a converted barn on 24 acres on Vashon Island. I call it the 
"barndominium!"

How do you spend your time outside of work?
Love to bake – my specialty is cookies, but I enjoy all baking and cooking. I like gardening, walking, spending time with family, fishing, riding my Polaris Ranger (right) on the property and watching sports. Go Hawks!

I also chair a foundation with Kelly in memory of my son Andy who passed away in 2006. He was training to be a firefighter. We provide scholarships to cadets that are enrolled in the Highline School District's vocational high school firefighting program that Andy attended. They use the funds to continue their education in Fire Services. Several cadets have attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks Firefighting program, and are now full-time firefighters. We also provide donations to Andy's high school to purchase training equipment, and donate to other organizations as well. To date, we have raised over $100,000.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Lynden Transport a top finisher in 2020 Quest for Quality Awards

Posted on Mon, Aug 10, 2020

Logistics Management Quest for Quality AwardLynden Transport continues to outperform other carriers in the western region, earning a top spot and its 24th award in the 37th annual Quest for Quality Awards. The company received the third-highest overall weighted score among Less-than-Truckload (LTL) Western Regional carriers and was especially strong in the Customer Service and Equipment & Operations categories. The Logistics Management annual awards are the gold standard for customer satisfaction and performance excellence for carriers, ports and logistics providers worldwide.

“Lynden Transport is proud to add another top score in the Western Regional LTL category. We’ve now received 24 awards which contribute to a combined total of 40 Quest for Quality awards earned by Lynden companies over the years,” says Lynden Transport President Paul Grimaldi. “This is a reflection of our long-standing focus on customers that we continually strive to uphold. I am especially proud of the 2020 award as it illustrates the dedication of our employees who have been working through the challenges of COVID-19 to serve our customers. Our team is committed to providing the Lynden brand of service excellence every day.”

The Quest for Quality Awards are the culmination of a six-month research project conducted by Peerless Research Group (PRG). For more than three decades, the awards have been regarded in the transportation and logistics industry as the most important measure of customer satisfaction and performance excellence. To determine the ‘best of the best,’ transportation and supply chain decision makers rate carriers, logistics providers and port operators on service quality in various categories such as on-time performance, value and customer service. This year, 4,504 ballots were cast from logistics and supply chain decision makers resulting in 144 companies earning Quest for Quality gold.

“What our editorial team has found amazing over the years is that no matter how many economic, regulatory or operational pressures they continue to face, the carrier and service provider communities find a way to step up to the plate to meet those evolving challenges,” says Michael Levans, Group Editorial Director of Peerless Media, LLC, publisher of Logistics Management magazine.

Tags: Logistics Management magazine, Quest for Quality Award, Lynden Transport

Alaska Marine Lines rail barges upgrade ballast systems

Posted on Wed, Aug 05, 2020

Alaska Marine Lines rail barge Four Alaska Marine Lines rail barges are getting new piping and ballast systems designed by marine industry leader Glosten with installation by Meridian Marine Industries. "The rail barges are hitting 20 years of service and were in need of some upgrades," explains John Maketa, T-115 Port Engineer in Seattle. "These barges are the backbone of our rail operations and Central Alaska service. The updates will prepare them for another 20 years of service."

Two barges, the Anchorage Provider and Whittier Provider, already have the new piping systems installed. The Fairbanks Provider is scheduled for updates in August and the Nana Provider sometime next year. Using a patented rack system, the rail barges transport containers and rail cars from Seattle to Whittier, AK where the rail cars are rolled onto the train tracks.

The ballast systems are a network of valves, pipes and pumps below deck on all Alaska Marine Lines rail barges. The tanks are filled with fresh water to trim the barge before sailing. With six 1,200-ton ballast tanks on each barge, a total weight of 2,400 tons of water is moved between tanks to trim the barge for efficient towing.

Each rail barge is receiving the following services and updates:

Robot removing paint
  • New ballast system, including all valves and actuators. An actuator is an attached electrical motor that allows the valves to be operated and monitored remotely. The operations crews can operate the system from on deck without going into the pump room.
  • System modifications to add ballast water treatment systems in the future.
  • New wave wall doors to protect the generator.
  • Rebuilt valves in the spill containment system with modifications that will allow inspection and repair in the future.
  • Removal of excessive hull paint built up by 20 years of paint jobs. Pictured right, a robot removes old paint from the hull of the Anchorage Provider at SeaSpan Drydock in Vancouver, B.C.
  • Removal of generators for complete inspections and replacement of worn parts.
  • Fuel tanks cleaned and refurbished.
  • Complete recoating of all ballast tanks.

"John has done a great job coordinating these updates, including planning, vendor selection, material logistics and scheduling with operations for maintenance windows to work on the four barges," says Marine Maintenance Manager David Byrne. "We are known for our exceptionally well-maintained and reliable equipment and these upgrades and renovations allow us to maintain that reputation with our customers."

Tags: Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska

Lynden employee ensures lifesaving drug reaches patient

Posted on Wed, Jul 29, 2020

My Post (2)-2"We are sometimes called upon to do the exceptional, to directly help a patient in need," says Brian MacAskill, Vice President and General Manager at Lynden International Logistics Co. Earlier this year, Lynden International Logistics Warehouse Supervisor Devendra Solanki (pictured right) received an emergency call from Health Canada at 11:23 p.m. A 10-year-old patient at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto required a lifesaving drug. Within 15 minutes, the order was enroute to the hospital and Devendra delivered it soon after for the patient. "We are very proud of Devendra," Brian says. "Great efforts are made on a daily basis that have a profound impact on the companies and customers we serve."

Tags: Lynden International Logistics Co., Lynden employees

How “The Beast” moved from Alberta to the North Slope

Posted on Thu, Jul 23, 2020

Lynden hauling ERD rigRig 26, Doyon Drilling's new extended reach drilling (ERD) rig, completed its 2,400-mile journey from Nisku, Alberta to Alaska's North Slope this past winter. Lynden Transport, Alaska West Express and Lynden Oilfield Services teamed up to haul the 10.5-million-pound rig in pieces from Canada to Deadhorse where it was put back together after more than 320 separate truckloads arrived. Nicknamed "the beast," it is the largest land-based rig in North America and the first ERD rig ever built and moved in North America.

"This was one of the most high-profile projects Lynden has ever done and certainly the largest project that I have been involved in," says Paul Friese, Lynden Transport Vice President of Alaska Sales. "We started talking about this move four years ago, started planning a year ago and began the work in June 2019. In just six months we hauled over 320 loads. Our past work moving Rig 142 for Doyon set a high standard and gave them confidence in the Lynden team to handle this larger project. Many say the future of Alaska rides on the success of this new rig and technology, so we were under intense pressure and scrutiny to make sure the loads were delivered intact and on time for the reassembly in Deadhorse."

Rig 26 will have the capability to directional drill over 35,000 ft. (about 6.3 miles) from a single drilling pad on the North Slope. Doyon Drilling has been working for more than three years to build a larger powerful drilling rig, with increased capabilities greater than any other mobile land-based drilling rig on the continent. The new rig's extended reach can access production zones that were previously inaccessible with current drilling technology and capability.

"We want to thank the Lynden team," says Mike Lasher, Project Manager for Doyon Drilling in Anchorage. "Edmonton's Rick Stark oversaw every shipment loaded in Nisku, and Dan Rychlik helped with pre-planning and shipping requirements. Natasha Earl, Deanna Benson and Darren Stansbury and the Fairbanks team managed loads based on our priorities to ensure we received the right loads in the right sequence."

Rick also served as the Lynden project manager for Rig 142 and was instrumental in providing loading knowledge and experience along with James Delowsky. Rick and James loaded and moved most loads and transported them to the yard for staging and Cratex wrapping.

Doyon 26 Drill RigLynden's Prudhoe Bay crew received and coordinated loads in Deadhorse around the clock to get the rig pieces where they needed to go, and the Edmonton team stepped up their game for the project. "This move impacted everyone from the shop to operations to the front office," says Canadian Lynden Transport General Manager Dan Rychlik. "Employees like Kent Maltais worked weekends; others postponed vacations. We even had to pull people from Calgary to help cover at times. I am extremely proud of the team effort here."

Alaska West Express, led by Steve Willford, planned and supervised the most challenging loads. Alaska West Express drivers and employees handle oversize and overweight loads to and within Alaska for all Lynden companies, and they were essential in delivering the awkward heavy hauls. Roughly 75 percent of the loads hauled were for the rig's subbase which consists of 525 items weighing a total of 1.7 million pounds. The Excel spreadsheet the Lynden team used for the move is a color-coded map of detailed dimensions on handrails, columns, wheel assemblies, platforms and other parts. Mike and other members of Doyon's team were set up on EZ Commerce, Lynden's reporting and tracking system, to help manage the transportation phase of the project and keep track of Lynden loads between Canada and the North Slope.

According to Paul, the heaviest and most unusual loads were the draw works, mud pumps, main beams, and engines for the rig. "When you consider that we had to move more than 300 loads that distance in six months during the winter ice road months with DOT road work and pilot car driver shortages, it's pretty impressive," he says. "We did all this while maintaining our current customer base with no impact to them while we took on this huge project. That is a testament to our dedicated operations team, drivers and mangers. I don't think there is any other company in Alaska that could've pulled this off in such a short time frame. We truly have the best team in the industry and this project proves it."

Watch the video below for a bird's eye view of Rig 26. 

Tags: Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Lynden Transport, Oversize freight, Lynden Capabilities

Everyday Hero Profile: Fred Austin

Posted on Mon, Jul 20, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Fred Austin, an icon at Lynden Transport in Alaska.

Everyday Hero Fred AustinName: Fred Austin

Company: Lynden Transport

Titles: Driver, Trainer and Instructor

On the job since: 1975

Superpower: Mentoring

Hometown: Gig Harbor, WA

Favorite Movie: South Pacific

Bucket List Destination: Antarctica

For Fun: Spending quiet time with his bride after raising 34 foster kids

Icon of the Alcan
"To really understand Fred Austin, talk to the drivers, dispatchers and our friends on the road system," says Lynden Chairman Jim Jansen. "They share my description of this 'Icon of the Alcan' – a kind and thoughtful gentleman, loved by us all, who has professionally served Lynden and its customers, safely and efficiently, for over 40 years. Hopefully Fred will continue as a Lynden Everyday Hero for many more."

If you don't know Fred Austin, you have probably heard of him. His trademark red bandana, his ability to spin a humorous story and those twinkling blue eyes make the 85-year-old professional driver a legend on on the road.

Fred came to work for Lynden in 1975 at the start of pipeline construction in Fairbanks. He wanted to own a truck to operate for Lynden but could not afford one. "We sold him tractor 118 real cheap, the lemon of the fleet, which did him no favors," Jim remembers. Fred kept the 1969 Peterbilt operating reliably in spite of its reputation.

Fred's love of machines with big engines began early. "I started young, about 10 years old, running a small John Deere dozer on my dad's farm," he says. At 18, he started learning to drive truck – hauling logs in a 1942 GMC GI in the mountains near Mt. Rainier. "I got in on the last of the big gas engines – 200 horse – on the logging roads, getting about 3 miles a gallon on the highway." Operating heavy equipment and driving trucks was the perfect job for Fred who says "I was always looking for larger and louder equipment and more smoke. As the guys I work with tell me, the call of the throttle got me."

In 1957, Fred joined the U.S. Navy and continued his driving career for Uncle Sam. "I was licensed to drive everything on wheels during my four years," he remembers. After his military career, it was back to the big machines. "My base for instructing at Lynden is my experience operating heavy equipment and driving log trucks," he explains.

In the mid-70s, Fred switched to lowboy trailers and LTL hauls for Lynden Transport. At this time, Fred and his wife Margery were busy raising six children plus four foster children. "The kids were mostly teenagers and they were eating a big pile of groceries," he says. "I took some side jobs as an owner-operator to keep the groceries coming during a bit of a slowdown at Lynden, but always stayed in contact with line dispatch. When work picked up at Lynden, I was under the green flag again."

During the pipeline construction many competing companies tried to lure Lynden drivers away with promises of higher salaries. "I always thought long-term and stayed with Lynden, and my decision proved correct. And here I am today!"

In addition to driving, Fred dispatched several years ago, and now serves as driver trainer and mentor while continuing to operate between Fairbanks and Beaver Creek, earning the respect of new drivers and veterans. In 2015, at age 79, he took the state test for Methods of Instruction Training and passed. He is the oldest person to sit for the test and continues to inspire and entertain students and instructors at the Lynden Training Center in Fairbanks.

Fred's stories were hard-earned while driving for Lynden. Retired Lynden Transport President Jim Beck remembers Fred's first trip from Beaver Creek. "The drive line in his tractor broke. He camped next to the truck for several days and made a new drive line out of a tree limb to complete the trip to Fairbanks," he says. "Fred is one of the finest drivers and gentleman you could ever meet."

Fairbanks Service Center Manager Darren Stansbury concurs. "Fred is an asset to the company and a true leader. No matter the situation Fred has a can-do attitude."

Fred feels it is his duty to pass on his knowledge and experience. "If I drive another million miles it will make no difference in this world, but if I can train someone to do the right thing and not get hurt, then I can make a difference in their life and the life of their family," he says.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Alaska Marine Lines celebrates 40 years

Posted on Wed, Jul 15, 2020

Alaska Marine Lines celebrates 40 yearsAlaska Marine Lines celebrates its 40th anniversary this year! That is 40 years we've been privileged to serve our amazing customers and local communities, 40 years side-by-side with the most wonderful, hard-working people in the barge industry and 40 years of experience fine tuning our service and reach to offer the largest fleet of equipment in Alaska.

In 1980, Lynden acquired the assets of Southeast Barge Lines from Western Towboat, Trucano Construction and Jim Harper and Southeast Alaska Barge Lines was established. "This began the long and productive partnership between Lynden and Western Towboat that we still enjoy today," explains Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson.

Two years later, Southeast Alaska Barge Lines was renamed Alaska Marine Lines. In 1985, as Foss Alaska Lines withdrew from Southeast service and Pacific Western Lines curtailed its service, Alaska Marine Lines purchased selected assets from those barge carriers and added many employees who are still with the Lynden companies today including Executive Vice President Alex McKallor. Also that year, service partner Arrowhead Transfer headed by Gordie Harang began providing services to Alaska Marine Lines in Southeast Alaska.

Alaska Marine Lines Presidents over the yearsPictured to the right, Alaska Marine Lines Presidents over the years include, from left: Bill Troy, Alex McKallor, Gail Knapp and current President Kevin Anderson.

Looking back, Kevin says some of the biggest changes have been in equipment. "We've gone from 20' containers to 40's, then 48's and now 53's, and forklifts with a capacity of 55,000 pounds that can now lift 120,000 pounds," he says. "The first barge was 130 feet long with a 1,000-HP tug. Today we have 420-foot barges towed by tugs with 5,000-HP."

In 2019, Alaska Marine Lines expanded its service area to include Arctic villages like Kaktovik to better serve customers statewide and this year has expanded its fleet with the purchase of two cargo barges.

"As we celebrate four decades of business I'd like to honor the dedicated and talented employees, past and present, who have contributed to our success," Kevin says. "We now service every major coastal region in Alaska. I look forward to seeing what the new decade will bring."

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines

Lynden Oilfield Services delivers critical freight

Posted on Wed, Jul 08, 2020

PistenBully mods on North SlopeLynden Oilfield Services equipment crossed tundra-covered public lands in Alaska this winter and spring to deliver critical infrastructure across the North Slope that couldn't wait until this summer's barging season.

Methanol, cement mixer trucks, front-end loaders, sheet steel and fire trucks were included in the remote deliveries. Time was limited as the tundra is closed to travel once the snow depth deteriorates. In the photo below a fire truck destined for the Barrow Airport is towed by a PistenBully pulling a sleigh across the North Slope Borough's Community Winter Access Trail. Air freight and other alternatives were not an option for most of the cargo due to weight and dimensional challenges.

Snow cat towing fire truck on North Slope "This season was the busiest yet for snow road projects, which meant many challenges for our team. With the hard work and innovative thinking of our crew we were able to pull it all off," says John Jansen, General Manager of Lynden Oilfield Services. The team moved more than a million pounds of freight on the North Slope this season using the PistenBully snow cats. These deliveries allowed for more efficient and newer housing in the community of Atqasuk and helped the village of Utqiaġvik repair and replace fuel storage areas. Unlike conventional trucks that move freight on roads with existing right-of-way and permits, the PistenBully snow cats must travel across property owned by a variety of entities at an average speed of 9 mph.

"We have to ask permission and/or obtain permits from all of the land owners before we can begin the work," says Tyler Bones, Director of HSSE for Alaska West Express. "The Lynden Oilfield Services team did an amazing job this year moving the freight that ranged from housing modules to a fire truck. We had a professional group of employees that made the long hours and challenges look easy."

The moves involve cooperation between Lynden companies and Alaska partners like the Bureau of Land Management, North Slope Borough and Alaska Department of Natural Resources. In all, Alaska West Express and Lynden Oilfield Services worked with 10 different local, state, and federal agencies and three native corporations this season.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Shipping in Alaska, Lynden Oilfield Services, Lynden Capabilities

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