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Everyday Hero Profile: Kendra McPhail

Posted on Thu, Oct 22, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Kendra McPhail, Customer Service Representative at Lynden Air Cargo in Anchorage, Alaska.

Everyday Hero Kendra McPhailName: Kendra McPhail

Company: Lynden Air Cargo

Title: Customer Service Representative

On the job since: 2018

Superpower: Positive force for change

Hometown: Palmer, Alaska

Favorite Movie: The Great Debaters

Bucket List Destination: Maldives

For Fun: Travel in state and outside the country, study the bible, and spend time with family and loved ones.

How did you start your career with Lynden?
I graduated from Fisk University in Nashville in 2017. I have a degree in political science, although I do not want to go into politics! After college, I thought I had a plan in place to further my education at another school in a master's program, but life doesn't always pan out the way you thought it would, so I came back home to Alaska. I applied for jobs, but they usually told me I was over-qualified or it wasn't the right fit. We had a family friend who works for the railroad and he does business with Lynden International. He told me Lynden was hiring. I applied on a Sunday, got a call on a Tuesday, had an interview later that week and started the following Monday in customer service. That was where I met Carly (Fielding) and Adam (Murray). I am a firm believer in being 15 to 20 minutes early so I showed up early for my interview. I think that made a good impression.

Tell us about your job.
It's a very interesting job assisting customers every day. There are so many things that come through our door – we transport dogs, goats and horses. It's hunting season, so we have backhauls from the villages like St. Mary's. People hunt there and send the meat back to their families in Anchorage or Fairbanks. We keep the meat chilled or frozen for them.

From the time I started to now, a lot has changed. We have revamped our backhaul processes to make the system more accurate, accountable and streamlined. The changes will go a long way toward providing better service to our customers and creating efficiencies within our operation. I created a list of procedures for the backhaul process that is allowing everyone to get a better handle on it.

What is your favorite or most rewarding part of your job?
Taking on new challenges and a feeling of being able to meet that challenge to a certain degree of satisfaction. I like to not just meet challenges, but exceed challenges. I like a little competition. You are giving me a task? Don't worry. I can handle it.

I've also had the privilege of attending trade shows representing Lynden Air Cargo. We just went to one at the University of Alaska Anchorage at the student athletic center for the Native Youth Olympics. We gave out swag and told them about our services and where we fly. I also did another trade show at the Sheraton in Anchorage with other employees from Lynden companies. And I will be attending a conference on diversity with colleague Emily Taylor.

What is a typical day like?
I work 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. No day is ever the same. When I come in the door I never know what I am walking into. I like that because it keeps it interesting. I also get to interact with different operations people like the warehouse crew. When I clock in at 11, I channel what everyone is doing or where they need support. After catching up on emails, I go around and ask if there is anything that needs to be done, whether that's a flight that needs to be closed, filing, answering emails, meeting with accounting to find missing paperwork, maybe a signature is missing somewhere. Most days of the week we have almost 24-hour coverage so my coworkers work staggered shifts with me.

What has been most challenging?
In customer service, people can be tough. You will always encounter people that won't be the most pleasant. I try to let it roll off and rise to the next level. You cannot take everything personally. I've had to learn that in my role here. My tactic is to kill them with kindness and roll with the punches.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I was born in Palmer and attended Pioneer Peak Elementary and Colony Middle and High Schools. I graduated in 2013. I have a younger brother who is 19 and in college and an older sister who is 27 and working in Washington, DC. My parents still live in Palmer. Both of my parents are educators. My dad was the director of education and instruction for the district and moved on to be a principal at a school called Pace which offers an alternate educational experience for the children in the Mat-Su Borough School District. My mom is in her 21st year of teaching and is working on her PhD.

When I was in middle and high school I was a member of the track team. I ran the 400, 200 and 4x1 and 4x4 relays. In middle school I did hurdles, but not in high school. I fell a few times and decided that was it! I also participated in cross country skiing and cross country running in high school. So I ran cross country in the fall, skied in the winter and did track and field in the spring.

Besides sports, I was on the student advisory board for the curriculum counsel, so I met with the instruction department and teachers and went over the curriculum for the entire school district. I was also the student representative for the school board and attended those meetings to update them on what was happening at our high school.

What would surprise most people about you?
When I was growing up, my mom would always tell people, 'be careful, she likes to talk.' Now she is saying that my gift of gab is being used to my advantage in my job as a customer service representative.

I like to recite poetry. I took poetry classes in high school and competed in a competition called Poetry Out Loud. You memorize poems and perform them in front of judges. I recited Maya Angelous' Phenomenal Woman. I went to districts and also participated in speech competitions when I was in elementary school.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I like to be outside walking in the mountains being adventurous. I'm an adrenaline junkie. I go zip lining, go to see waterfalls and try to spend my time doing exciting things. I believe that life is short and tomorrow's not promised. I live my life to the fullest and do the things that I love. I attend New Hope Baptist Church in Anchorage and am heavily involved in choir and other activities. I also play softball in a league representing Lynden. I like to hang out with friends, go out to eat, spend time at church, listen to poetry and recite poetry. I recited a poem in January at a Martin Luther King Jr event in Anchorage.

What are your thoughts about working for Lynden Air Cargo?
I have been afforded many opportunities to grow and elevate myself by going to different trade shows and I'm finding out things that I didn't know that I really enjoy doing. I've been able to dig into the sales and marketing side of things and talk with managers about certain ideas I have to make improvements and differentiate Lynden from other companies. I really enjoy the logistics side of the business. My goal is to earn a master's degree while still at Lynden and apply those benefits to my current job. I also had an opportunity to go to fishing with co-workers and meet some of the customers I work with. I caught a lot of fish and had a chance to engage with our customers in an informal setting. Getting to know them on a personal level helped me ask questions like 'what do you think about our service and what can we do better?' It was something completely new for me and a great way to interact with the customers we serve.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Knik improves and maintains infrastructure in Alaska

Posted on Thu, Oct 08, 2020

Knik FlaggerSummer months are the busy season for Knik Construction and, this year, crews wrapped up two projects in Bethel, AK. The Chief Eddie Hoffman Highway and the Bethel Parallel Runway Airport projects.

The Knik team worked hard repairing Chief Eddie Hoffman Highway at the request of the Alaska Department of Transportation. Roads take a beating in Alaska with freeze and thaw cycles creating potholes and crumbled asphalt erosion. Improvements to the Bethel highway included work on corners, shoulders and the installation of six inches of foamed asphalt with another four inches of asphalt on top. Knik has also installed culverts and added topsoil and hydro-seeding.

"Our work to improve roads and airports is very important to the Alaska economy and the health and safety of Alaska residents. These projects keep communities connected and maintain and protect the routes necessary to deliver essential goods," says Knik President Dan Hall. "We are entrusted with vital infrastructure projects and our employees take this responsibility seriously. We make every effort to hire as many local people as possible and finish our projects on time and within budget." Pictured above, Knik Flagger Wilson Green directed drivers to the work site in Bethel. Wilson is a local Bethel resident hired to work on the Chief Eddie Hoffman Highway project.

Knik Bethel Airport ProjectKnik also continued a long-term project to install a parallel runway and three taxiways at the Bethel Airport (pictured right). The project was split into three phases. Crews were most recently working on Phase III which called for expanding the primary runway safety area to a width of 500 feet along its entire 8,400-foot length.

A secondary runway embankment was constructed with a 4,600-foot by 150-foot runway safety area. Crews developed two material sites on airport property to supply the work. Over 1,000,000 cubic yards of sandy-silt material was excavated and hauled from these two sources. In prior phases, Knik installed a new standby generator module, electrical service, new runway lighting and underground fuel storage tank de-commissioning among other improvements.

As a general heavy construction company, Knik specializes in complex, logistically challenging projects in hard-to-reach places like remote bush Alaska, Guantanamo Bay, Wake Island and Midway Island. Knik crews work seasonally depending on the work which may mean moving materials via waterways in summer and constructing ice roads in the winter.

In addition to construction projects, each year Knik processes over 100,000 tons of gravel, rock, sand and other aggregate at its Platinum Pit and Quarry in Bethel. Gravel is shipped to remote sites in Western Alaska and other parts of the world by sister companies Bering Marine and Alaska Marine Lines.

Tags: Bering Marine Corporation, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Knik Construction

Lynden delivers PPE to frontline medical workers in Alaska

Posted on Fri, Sep 25, 2020

Lynden delivers PPEEarlier this year Northern Star Resources Limited, owner of the Pogo Gold Mine, donated $1.5 million worth of medical personal protective equipment (PPE) to Alaska communities with a focus on Fairbanks and the delta regions. Lynden International arranged customs clearance and Lynden Transport delivered the supplies to the communities which were then distributed by Foundation Health partners to doctors, dentists and health providers who have been unable to secure PPE on their own. "We value our partnership with Lynden and appreciate the help distributing these supplies," says Wendie MacNaughton, External Affairs Manager for Northern Star. The shipment, which was the largest donation received from private industry, included 12,500 isolation gowns, 100,000 N95 masks and 400,000 surgical masks. "Lynden International employees were glad we could assist Northern Star-Pogo navigate the import challenges that come with these PPE imports, and we're extremely grateful for their generous donation to Alaskan health care providers," says Keith Hall, Licensed Customs Broker for Lynden International in Anchorage.

Tags: Lynden International, Lynden employees, Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Lynden’s global humanitarian work grows

Posted on Wed, Sep 23, 2020

Lynden International multimodal capabilitiesLynden International supports humanitarian, relief and health programs in many challenging, underdeveloped corners of the world. As a global freight forwarder, Lynden serves as a logistics partner for customers by simplifying complex logistics requirements during health crises and natural disasters.

In Seattle, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center works with Lynden to help meet its goals of researching and fighting cancer globally, including low- and middle-income countries, as well as supporting COVID research efforts today. Lynden coordinates and ships materials and supplies to Uganda and other destinations to support the Global Oncology group and laboratories within its research group in Uganda.

Fred Hutch is just one customer of many that Lynden International’s Global Health and Humanitarian group is attracting during the COVID crisis. “This part of our business is growing, and we are receiving praise from our customers,” says Lynden International President John Kaloper. “We are proud to be associated with these life-saving medical and research groups, and Fred Hutch is a recognized leader in this field.”

Lynden’s ability to call upon the multimodal capabilities of its sister companies for air, sea or surface transportation allows customers to trim costs, set reliable timetables and budgets and take advantage of knowledgeable, experienced planning resources. “Our experience with global transportation and logistics means that we take on the challenges of this type of coordination so U.S. government agencies like FEMA, USAID, multi-national companies, non-profit organizations, and other businesses can concentrate on assisting those in need,” Kaloper explains.

Lynden’s recent work includes the shipping and warehousing of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) from China, temperature-controlled shipping of frozen COVID test kits, movement of biological material for use in the search for a Coronavirus vaccine, and handling other fragile and sensitive freight for global customers.

Tags: Lynden International, Multi-modal shipping, International shipping, Relief Efforts, Emergency Response

Everyday Hero Profile: Aaron Delahoussaye

Posted on Fri, Sep 18, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Aaron Delahoussaye, Driver at Lynden Oilfield Services in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

Name: Aaron DelahoussayeEveryday Hero Aaron Delahoussaye

Company: Lynden Oilfield Services

Title: Driver

On the job since: 1996

Superpower: Getting it done

Hometown: Palmer, AK

Favorite movie: Original Star Wars

Bucket list destination: Europe

For fun: Traveling with my wife

How did you start your career at Lynden?
I started my career at 22 as a warehouseman at Lynden Transport in Anchorage. I worked on the dock as I worked toward earning my Commercial Driver's License (CDL). I transferred to Prudhoe Bay in 2012 and was part of the transition to Lynden Oilfield Services (LOIL) in 2015. I am now a driver and haul everything from bulk chemicals to oversized freight on any given day.

What is a typical day like for you?
There is no typical day in Prudhoe Bay – every day is different. Everyone up here can pretty much do everything. That's what I like about it. You don't get stuck in the same routine. My co-workers have nicknamed me the horse as in "work horse."

I was part of the Doyon drill rig move of 'the beast' from Canada to Alaska and have hauled a lot of drill rig components over the years.

What has been most challenging in your career?
The most challenging is probably being away from home and family for two weeks or more at a time. You miss out on a few things along the way. Although we have a regular two-week-on, two-week-off schedule, I've been away as long as six weeks for special projects.

Weather is also a challenge. Winters bring visibility issues, freezing temps and wind that suddenly comes out of nowhere. We have our winter gear to protect against frostbite and below-freezing temperatures, but it can be tough at times. One specific story that comes to mind is when we first started running the PistenBullys. We had one operator at LOIL and the other was a contracted operator that helped us with our first three trips to Barrow, AK. The contractor left the Slope because we thought our season was over when we got a call for two more loads. I was very new to operating the machines, but I followed the other driver on a 530-mile roundtrip across the Arctic Slope from Deadhorse to Atqasuk to Barrow and back to Deadhorse. We were on the trail for four days and made record time without any issues.

What do you like best about your job?
I love the challenges. From the freight to the conditions to the time schedules, every day is different. I'm always learning. Up here you get to be the teacher and the student every single day.

The animals we see around Prudhoe Bay also make the job unique. Since we are up on the coast at the very top of Alaska, we have had polar bears, grizzly bears, caribou and other wildlife come into the yard looking for food. Swans and geese come up in the summer to have their babies on the lake, then migrate south for the winter.

What are you most proud of in your career?
I'm most proud of my longevity with the company. To be able to say you've spent almost your entire working career with one company says something about you and the company.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I've been married to my beautiful wife Tomara for 22 years. She works for Alaska Airlines as a Flight Attendant. We have two awesome kids, son Kaden and daughter Hannah. They are off to a great start with their careers. So we just became empty nesters and are still trying to figure out what to do with ourselves with no kids in the house. I guess we can do whatever we want!

What was your first job?
My first job was with my grandpa. He owned a log cabin business. We would fly out to these remote locations and build cabins for customers with the challenges of no electricity, getting the building materials to the job sites and dealing with wild animals from time to time.

What would surprise most people about you?
I don't know if this is surprising, but I'm now in my 40s, and I've never broken a bone.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
A. We moved from Alaska to Las Vegas three years ago to be closer to family. Lately I've been working on our backyard, landscaping and hanging out by the pool. We're looking to get an RV and travel around the states. When we still lived in Alaska, I spent time snowmachining, hunting, fishing and skiing at Alyeska.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Lynden International's overnight turnaround for charter of PPE

Posted on Wed, Aug 26, 2020

Lynden International teamThis hearty band of Lynden International employees was ready and waiting for a FedEx charter flight of personal protective equipment (PPE) arriving from China to the Anchorage airport earlier this year. They quickly unloaded five 53-foot containers worth of masks, gowns and other materials and palletized it for next-morning delivery to the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services warehouse. According to Regional Vice President Rick Pollock, most employees were working remotely at the time, but the group immediately responded to the call to action and worked late into the night to get the work done. After the Alaska governor made the request for PPE supplies for Alaska's frontline workers, Lynden worked with FedEx and other partners to coordinate the charter, sourcing suppliers in China and handling customs. "From the first planning call in March to the plane landing in Anchorage, Lynden was with us every step of the way. They are a great partner and we are appreciative of their logistical support during the COVID pandemic response," says Heidi Hedberg, Director of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.

Tags: Lynden International, Lynden employees, Lynden Capabilities

Everyday Hero Profile: Becky MacDonald

Posted on Wed, Aug 19, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Becky MacDonald, Logistics Manager at Lynden Logistics in Seattle, Washington.

Everyday Hero Becky MacDonaldName: Becky MacDonald

Company: Lynden Logistics

Title: Logistics Manager for oil refineries

On the job since: 1985

Superpower: Grace under pressure

Hometown: Vashon Island, WA

Favorite Movie: Remember the Titans

Bucket List Destination: Iceland

For Fun: Baking, travel, beadwork

How did you start your career at Lynden?
In 1985, I was working at Foss Alaska Lines in the rates dept. When Foss sold their assets to Lynden, I came to Alaska Marine Lines with the move. I worked at Alaska Marine Lines for 25 years starting in rates and billing, then moved into several positions, which included Pricing Manager, Customer Service Manager and Intermodal Services. In 2010, I moved to Lynden Logistics and now handle the transportation for five refineries operated by Marathon (formerly Tesoro) and Par Hawaii, along with capital and retail projects for Marathon as they come up for bid.

What is a typical day like for you?
Every day is different, which I really like. I handle every step of a shipment from quoting and pricing shipments to set up, dispatch, tracking, delivery and invoicing. It can be a 10-pound box or a 150,000-pound heat exchanger and anything in between.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Managing three projects at the same time. I work best under pressure and this kept me hopping!

What do you like best about your job?
My customers. I have built great relationships and enjoy working with them.
I've also had the pleasure of working with several Lynden companies on shipments. My shipments may be routed via air, ocean, truck or charter, so it's great to have the knowledge and capability of Lynden employees to work with. Everyone is always willing to help with a One Lynden attitude.

Lynden has been such a great company to work for. After 35 years, I still love my job.

What are you most proud of in your career?
Developing the Intermodal Department at Alaska Marine Lines. It started in 1989 with a customer asking if we could ship a 40-foot container of materials from North Carolina to Wrangell without transload. I worked with Pat Stocklin at Lynden Transport who taught me the process. From then on, Alaska Marine Lines offered the service to household good companies, retail and construction businesses, and it grew from there. We were able to partner with a third-party rail company and move their 53-foot containers through to Alaska which opened the door to more business. Our customers appreciate the door-to-door service. At Alaska Marine Lines, I was taught you don't say no. You say 'I'll look into it and get back to you.'

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I grew up on Vashon Island, WA on the beach. We had to walk down a long trail to our house, or drive in on the beach if we had a lot of stuff to unload. My dad was a 6th grade teacher and we moved to Vashon when I was three years old. I have two older brothers and one younger brother whom I adore. They and their families all live on Vashon, and we are very close. Our parents taught us to work hard, be honest and kind.

Our playground was the beach and the woods. We heated our house with wood so I learned how to chop and stack wood at an early age. We caught fish, crab, octopus and geoduck off our beach, and mom did an amazing job cooking all of it.

1914 Bristol Bay boatGrowing up, we had a 30-foot Bristol Bay boat that was built in 1914 (right). From the time I was 10 until age 17, we spent our summers cruising the Canadian Islands living off the land. I spent many days in the spring working with my dad to get the boat ready for our trip.

We left home two days after school was out and came home three days before school started. Our dogs and cats came with us. My parents continued those trips after us kids grew up.

In high school I played basketball and participated in track as well as managing the boy's varsity baseball team. In my 20s I played softball, basketball and volleyball – and continued playing into my 30s, then began managing and coaching my kids' sports. I was a pitcher, catcher and played third base on three different softball teams.

My daughter Kelly is now 29 and works for Alaska Marine Lines as an account manager in Juneau.

What was your first job?
When I was 18, I went to work for Crowley Maritime as a cook on the tugs. I was one of two women working on the boats at that time. My first outside trip was for four months escorting oil tankers in and out of Valdez, AK. I made several trips to and from Hawaii and Whittier. I asked several times to be sent to Prudhoe Bay on Crowley's annual sea lift but was told it was too long of a trip for a girl. How times have changed!

What would surprise most people about you?
Becky MacDonald with quadI live in a converted barn on 24 acres on Vashon Island. I call it the 
"barndominium!"

How do you spend your time outside of work?
Love to bake – my specialty is cookies, but I enjoy all baking and cooking. I like gardening, walking, spending time with family, fishing, riding my Polaris Ranger (right) on the property and watching sports. Go Hawks!

I also chair a foundation with Kelly in memory of my son Andy who passed away in 2006. He was training to be a firefighter. We provide scholarships to cadets that are enrolled in the Highline School District's vocational high school firefighting program that Andy attended. They use the funds to continue their education in Fire Services. Several cadets have attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks Firefighting program, and are now full-time firefighters. We also provide donations to Andy's high school to purchase training equipment, and donate to other organizations as well. To date, we have raised over $100,000.

Tags: Everyday Heroes

Lynden Transport a top finisher in 2020 Quest for Quality Awards

Posted on Mon, Aug 10, 2020

Logistics Management Quest for Quality AwardLynden Transport continues to outperform other carriers in the western region, earning a top spot and its 24th award in the 37th annual Quest for Quality Awards. The company received the third-highest overall weighted score among Less-than-Truckload (LTL) Western Regional carriers and was especially strong in the Customer Service and Equipment & Operations categories. The Logistics Management annual awards are the gold standard for customer satisfaction and performance excellence for carriers, ports and logistics providers worldwide.

“Lynden Transport is proud to add another top score in the Western Regional LTL category. We’ve now received 24 awards which contribute to a combined total of 40 Quest for Quality awards earned by Lynden companies over the years,” says Lynden Transport President Paul Grimaldi. “This is a reflection of our long-standing focus on customers that we continually strive to uphold. I am especially proud of the 2020 award as it illustrates the dedication of our employees who have been working through the challenges of COVID-19 to serve our customers. Our team is committed to providing the Lynden brand of service excellence every day.”

The Quest for Quality Awards are the culmination of a six-month research project conducted by Peerless Research Group (PRG). For more than three decades, the awards have been regarded in the transportation and logistics industry as the most important measure of customer satisfaction and performance excellence. To determine the ‘best of the best,’ transportation and supply chain decision makers rate carriers, logistics providers and port operators on service quality in various categories such as on-time performance, value and customer service. This year, 4,504 ballots were cast from logistics and supply chain decision makers resulting in 144 companies earning Quest for Quality gold.

“What our editorial team has found amazing over the years is that no matter how many economic, regulatory or operational pressures they continue to face, the carrier and service provider communities find a way to step up to the plate to meet those evolving challenges,” says Michael Levans, Group Editorial Director of Peerless Media, LLC, publisher of Logistics Management magazine.

Tags: Logistics Management magazine, Quest for Quality Award, Lynden Transport

Alaska Marine Lines rail barges upgrade ballast systems

Posted on Wed, Aug 05, 2020

Alaska Marine Lines rail barge Four Alaska Marine Lines rail barges are getting new piping and ballast systems designed by marine industry leader Glosten with installation by Meridian Marine Industries. "The rail barges are hitting 20 years of service and were in need of some upgrades," explains John Maketa, T-115 Port Engineer in Seattle. "These barges are the backbone of our rail operations and Central Alaska service. The updates will prepare them for another 20 years of service."

Two barges, the Anchorage Provider and Whittier Provider, already have the new piping systems installed. The Fairbanks Provider is scheduled for updates in August and the Nana Provider sometime next year. Using a patented rack system, the rail barges transport containers and rail cars from Seattle to Whittier, AK where the rail cars are rolled onto the train tracks.

The ballast systems are a network of valves, pipes and pumps below deck on all Alaska Marine Lines rail barges. The tanks are filled with fresh water to trim the barge before sailing. With six 1,200-ton ballast tanks on each barge, a total weight of 2,400 tons of water is moved between tanks to trim the barge for efficient towing.

Each rail barge is receiving the following services and updates:

Robot removing paint
  • New ballast system, including all valves and actuators. An actuator is an attached electrical motor that allows the valves to be operated and monitored remotely. The operations crews can operate the system from on deck without going into the pump room.
  • System modifications to add ballast water treatment systems in the future.
  • New wave wall doors to protect the generator.
  • Rebuilt valves in the spill containment system with modifications that will allow inspection and repair in the future.
  • Removal of excessive hull paint built up by 20 years of paint jobs. Pictured right, a robot removes old paint from the hull of the Anchorage Provider at SeaSpan Drydock in Vancouver, B.C.
  • Removal of generators for complete inspections and replacement of worn parts.
  • Fuel tanks cleaned and refurbished.
  • Complete recoating of all ballast tanks.

"John has done a great job coordinating these updates, including planning, vendor selection, material logistics and scheduling with operations for maintenance windows to work on the four barges," says Marine Maintenance Manager David Byrne. "We are known for our exceptionally well-maintained and reliable equipment and these upgrades and renovations allow us to maintain that reputation with our customers."

Tags: Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska

Lynden employee ensures lifesaving drug reaches patient

Posted on Wed, Jul 29, 2020

My Post (2)-2"We are sometimes called upon to do the exceptional, to directly help a patient in need," says Brian MacAskill, Vice President and General Manager at Lynden International Logistics Co. Earlier this year, Lynden International Logistics Warehouse Supervisor Devendra Solanki (pictured right) received an emergency call from Health Canada at 11:23 p.m. A 10-year-old patient at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto required a lifesaving drug. Within 15 minutes, the order was enroute to the hospital and Devendra delivered it soon after for the patient. "We are very proud of Devendra," Brian says. "Great efforts are made on a daily basis that have a profound impact on the companies and customers we serve."

Tags: Lynden International Logistics Co., Lynden employees

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