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Lynden companies carry ceremonial totem pole to Hoonah, AK

Posted on Thu, Jun 16, 2016

Totem_Pole_with_three_carvers_in_Hoonah.jpgAlaska Marine Lines and LTI, Inc. donated the transportation of a ceremonial totem pole from Bellingham, WA to Hoonah, AK for a June 4 dedication in the Tlingit village. Carved by Scott Jensen, Jeff Skaflestad and Fred Fulmer at Jensen's Bellingham studio, the totem was requested by elders of the Chookaneidee Clan to replace an ancestral totem pole that, according to legend, served as a source of wisdom, protection and direction for the clan's shaman when the clan was located at Glacier Bay, AK.

The advance of the "Little Ice Age" between 1300-1870 drove the Tlingit out of Glacier Bay. The pole remained and was eventually enveloped in ice.  "After Glacier Bay was designated a national park, the clan was not allowed to return to their homeland," explains Master Carver Scott Jensen. "The clan relocated in Hoonah and, years later, the totem reappeared in the creek there.  Although the pole is now gone, the clan elders have wanted to replace it for generations."

Skaflestad relocated from Hoonah to Bellingham and Fulmer from Juneau to help Jensen carve the totem in his studio. After five months of work, the totem was finished and ready to begin its journey to Hoonah. Jensen called Lynden for help.

The Alaska Marine Lines team arrived at Jensen's Bellingham studio in May to pick up the 11-foot, 2,000-pound totem, which is considered both a clan and shaman pole. The crated totem pole was secured on a trailer for the ride to Lynden, WA where LTI, Inc.'s Tom Rainey used a forklift to carefully place it into a container for the ride to Seattle and transfer onto the barge for the journey to Southeast Alaska. In Petersburg, AK, the pole was transferred barge to barge for the final leg to Hoonah. "As a company serving Alaska for over 60 years, Lynden is proud to provide the transportation to bring this important ancestral piece back to Hoonah," says Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.Totem_Pole_in_shop.jpg

Although the elders who requested the new totem passed away before the dedication in June, the carvers say the ceremony was very moving. "We felt the presence of our ancestors," says Skaflestad who is part Tlingit. "There were many tears as we placed the totem pole in its ceremonial location in the creek. It was a proud moment of unification for all of us."  

"We feel very blessed to have Lynden's support in this project," Jensen says. "Each member of the Lynden team took great care in making sure the totem was safe and secure along its journey."

 

 

Tags: LTI Inc., Alaska Marine Lines, Southeast Alaska, Alaska, totem pole

Scheuerle trailer expands heavy haul capabilities

Posted on Wed, Jun 08, 2016

Scheurle_Trailer_with_Mod_E_in_transit_on_Dalton_Hwy.jpgLynden companies are known for providing customers with the latest, most versatile equipment and a hydraulic platform trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year is proving to be useful for a variety of projects in Alaska. Manufactured by German company Scheuerle, the trailer is built to handle long and heavy loads. According to Alaska West Express President Scott Hicks, the trailer carries the weight over instead of between the axles, requiring less steel to support the load and increasing payload.

The trailer was a keystone of Alaska West Express’ recent pipeline project in Alaska (see photo above) and has greatly increased heavy haul capabilities. “Besides the 100-ton payload, the manufacturer provides a program to determine estimated axle weights for permitting,” says Steve Willford, Project Manager. By inputting load data, the program calculates the projected load distribution on the axles. This data can then be submitted to DOT for overweight permits. The program has proven extremely accurate and saves valuable employee time as well as reducing liability.  

"The trailer hydraulic readings and the program have increased our capability to forecast and increases our confidence that we are exactly within limits for road and bridge crossings with our loads,” Scott says. Alaska West Express drivers and shop and maintenance employees participated in a three-day training program to learn the specialized features of the trailer once it arrived last year. The first load it carried was a survey boat 83 feet long and 23 feet wide from Prudhoe Bay to Anchorage.

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Multi-modal project supports pipeline pump station

Posted on Fri, Jun 03, 2016

Alaska West Express and Alaska Marine Lines recently completed a nine-month multimodal move of pipe skids and other freight for an oil pipeline customer. Thirty loads originated at a manufacturer in Bellingham, WA and required marine and surface moves for final delivery to Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station #5 between Deadhorse and Valdez.  The pump station is an important relief station to slow the flow of oil as it descends from the Brooks Valley.

“This project began as a smaller move last summer and it continued to develop as the customer learned of our heavy haul and other capabilities,” says Steve Willford, Alaska West Express Project Manager in Fairbanks.

The project included three oversized loads which required transfer to a shuttle barge in Bellingham (see above) and on to the mainline barge in Seattle for eventual delivery to Whittier and Valdez. “They were odd-ball pieces, over-dimensional and overweight – not easy to move over the road,” Steve says.  Once they arrived in Valdez, Alaska West Express drivers Casey King, Andrew Wessels, Gary Ridall and Scott Vaughan (driving push truck) took over the delivery to the pump station. Jack Binder was the load supervisor for the Valdez shipments. Other loads arrived in Anchorage before the sailings stopped for the winter and were delivered by drivers Ken Seipel, Brian Ambrose and Del Shagen.  

Lynden is known for getting the job done and providing extra servicMod_C_Valdez_6.jpges when needed.  The final loads were delivered to the site when the installation contractor was on winter shutdown, so Alaska West Express arranged a jacking crew for unloading. Through careful coordination and planning, the arrival of the final loads was synchronized with the arrival of the jacking crew. “When we pulled away from the site, the loads were up off the ground where the customer wanted them. We were happy to provide literally everything they required,” says Jack.

Good weather helped the project stay on track as well as a new Scheuerle hydraulic highway trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year. The trailer is capable of carrying 100 tons and was put to work carrying the 84-ton back-pressure module between Valdez and the pump station. But the real key to the project’s success, according to Steve, was teamwork between Alaska West Express operations in Tacoma, Anchorage and Fairbanks and Alaska Marine Lines crews handling the barge moves in Seattle, Bellingham and Anchorage. “Our joint capabilities and smooth working relationships really came together to provide our customer with a seamless, door-to-door transportation package.”

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Trans-Alaska Pipeline

Lynden Air Cargo receives 14th consecutive AACA Safety Award

Posted on Wed, Jun 01, 2016

AACA_Safety_Award_-_Michelle_Fabry_LAC.jpgMichelle Fabry, Lynden Air Cargo’s Director of Safety, accepted the Alaska Air Carriers Association (AACA) Safety Award from Director John Duncan of the Federal Aviation Administration at the February award luncheon in Anchorage.  With the 2015 award, Lynden has received 14 consecutive safety awards which are presented to incident and accident-free carriers each year.

“We are very proud of our safety record,” Michelle says. “It all goes back to our employees and their dedication to safety in the operation of our aircraft, maintenance, cargo handling and following established procedures.”

Also in February, Lynden Air Cargo received news that it is the only carrier in the nation to receive approval of its Safety Management System Implementation Plan (SMSIP) on first submission to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Implementation Plan details how Lynden will meet the FAA’s regulatory requirements. “We’ve been working on SMS Implementation for over three years. At the time of submittal, we showed that our plan was 80 percent complete with full implementation scheduled for the end of 2016,” Michelle explains.

A team of department managers from operations, cargo services and maintenance worked together to develop the plan which included going through every FAA line item and detailing how Lynden would meet the requirement. According to Michelle, carriers who do not receive initial approval receive a visit from a team of FAA officials to help them finish the plan correctly. “This is a big deal for us. We have a great group here that got it right the first time.” Full implementation of the SMSIP is not required until 2018, so Lynden is not only ahead of schedule but setting the bar for other carriers.

Tags: Lynden, Lynden Air Cargo, Safety, Safety Award, Award

Lynden International sends classics across the pond

Posted on Wed, Jun 01, 2016

Gas tank drained. Check. Battery cables tied back. Check. Original Bill of Sale and shipper photo ID. Check.

After 18 years at Lynden International and countless global shipments, International Agent Colleen Delaney knows what is needed to ship just about anything overseas. Automobiles have become her specialty over the past few years as she handles the safe ocean transport of vintage automobiles from the U.S. to the U.K. for London-based American Legends, LLC. “We don’t typically ship vehicles, due to the extensive paperwork and customs requirements, but we will handle this type of shipment for customers who approach us with these special requests,” she says. So far, Colleen has handled the transport of Corvettes, Mustangs, Ferraris, a 1965 Buick Riviera and she is preparing to ship over a Trans-Am from the Smokey and the Bandit film and a replica of the General Lee, a 1969 Dodge Charger from the TV show The Dukes of Hazzard.

When it comes to loading and securing the valuable automobiles into containers Lynden turns to trusted partner SeaPac Transportation Services of Seattle. “We use SeaPac for all our ‘special needs and delicate handling’ FCL shipments,” Colleen says. President Paul Kimball was Lynden Transport’s Vice President of Administration in the 1970s and understands the Lynden brand of customer service and excellence. In addition to cars, engines and other specialty parts are palletized and shipped via ocean for the company. “SeaPac is the best of the beColleen__Jack_best_pic.jpgst in this area. We won’t partner with just any company – we require top notch service to keep our customers happy,” Colleen explains.

The export of vehicles requires an extensive amount of paperwork. The original title and Bill of Sale is required by customs to prevent stolen freight. Customs filing must also be presented 72 hours prior to the sailing of the vessel so that the vehicle is available for inspection by customs if they so choose. “Lynden International offers this premium service at reasonable prices compared to other forwarders,” Colleen says.

Most of the classics that Lynden ships for American Legends are headed to auctions in London or are sold to car collectors throughout Europe.

Tags: Lynden International, international shipping, Lynden, Lynden Transport

New marine safety system launched

Posted on Wed, May 25, 2016

Safety_Management_System_training.jpgExecutive management from Naknek Barge Lines, Bering Marine Corporation and Alaska Marine Lines met in Seattle earlier this year for the first training session to launch the joint Marine Safety Management System (SMS).  They were joined by Jim Maltby, Lynden Director of HSSE, and Rheagan Sparks, Lynden’s Marine Risk Manager.  Their objective: to educate participants about the internal audit processes within the SMS and to prepare them to conduct field audits aboard Lynden vessels during the 2016 operating season.

The first day of the training, led by Lynden Consultant Dione Lee of QSE Solutions, consisted of classroom learning and goal identification.  Participants took their newfound skills into the field on day two by conducting mock vessel audits aboard the Naknek tugboats Crosspoint and Polar Wind (see photo).  The group took turns in the roles of auditor and crew.

 Implementation of a formal Safety Management System is a growing trend in the maritime industry, according to Rheagan. “Since the acquisition of Northland Services in 2013, the three primary Lynden maritime companies have been working to consolidate their pre-existing procedures into a more coordinated format,” she says. “The SMS allows the companies to standardize and document their procedures.  This is part of a continually evolving process of improvement that reduces the likelihood of accidents and promotes a culture of safety.”  The new SMS system is endorsed by Lynden’s maritime liability insurer, Steamship Mutual P&I Club, positioning Lynden as an elite operator within the maritime industry.

 Captains from Naknek, Bering Marine and Western Towboat Company gave positive feedback about the January training.  “The SMS manual mostly reflects what we already do, but now it’s documented and accessible for everyone,” says Tim Kinkopf, Naknek General Manager. Future training sessions for vessel crews are scheduled later this year.

Tags: Bering Marine Corporation, Alaska Marine Lines, Safety, HSSE

New barge ramps in Ketchikan, Petersburg

Posted on Wed, May 18, 2016

After 30 years of service, Alaska Marine Lines’ Ketchikan barge ramp has moved to Petersburg. In its place is a new port cargo ramp constructed by Western Towboat. “We are excited to have a new ramp in Ketchikan and also happy to provide Petersburg with the first cargo ramp ever installed at that port,” says Southeast Alaska Marine Operations Manager Ricky Morgan. Removing the old ramp and installing the new one was a two-week process and included seven days of repairing and repainting the existing floatation tank system.New_barge_ramp_-_AML_Ketchikan.jpg

Both ramps are 120 feet long and 24 feet wide. The Ketchikan ramp operates by an onshore air supply system which supplies air to a flotation tank bolted to the ramp. The beach end pivots at the abutment connection. “The new ramp has a refined and stronger barge end transition design,” Ricky explains. “The old design put the ramp surface about 16 inches above the barge deck when the ramp was set in place on the barge. This required an additional wedge transition piece to be set in place to allow forklift access.” The new design has closed that gap to only 4 inches and it features a small transition plate, fixed to the end of the ramp by a hinge.

Petersburg’s ramp project was completed in April. The Petersburg crew is working on repairs and fabricating modifications to change it from a flotation support to an A-frame design. The ramp will also be sandblasted and painted.

According to Ricky, the Petersburg operation has been a “pass/pass” operation for many years. “With the cargo ramp installation, we have to reconfigure the dock face pilings and install a pedestal and electrical system for the A-frame.” A large concrete abutment must also be installed to anchor the ramp into the beach. “Having a fully operational cargo ramp in Petersburg should greatly increase productivity and operational efficiencies,” he says.

Ricky recognized the Ketchikan and Petersburg operations groups for their assistance with the project as well as Western Towboat for fabrication of the new ramp and A-frame. He also commended the Ocean Navigator Crew for their assistance with transporting both ramps to their new homes. “Special thanks to Gary Peterson, Rick McKinley, Rex Mansfield and Tom Sheehan, our expert team of crane operators, who executed safe precision while removing and installing the extremely heavy ramp system in Ketchikan,” he added. “And to Gordon Lindblad, who orchestrated every detail of this project, from start to finish, safely and efficiently.”

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, barge service, Alaska, Ketchikan, Petersburg

Lynden celebrates 10th anniversary of Pogo Mine and ongoing partnership

Posted on Tue, Apr 12, 2016

This spring, Lynden Transport and Alaska West Express celebrated 10 years of doing business with the Pogo Gold Mine near Fairbanks. To commemorate both the mine’s anniversary and the ongoing business relationship, Fairbanks Sales Manager Ken Hall presented External Affairs Manager Lorna Shaw and General Manager Chris Kennedy wPogo_mine_-_Lynden_emp.jpgith a plaque at the mine headquarters office in Delta Junction.

Pogo Mine is one of Lynden’s largest customers in Fairbanks and the partnership goes way back – pre-dating this year’s 10th anniversary. Exploration at the Pogo Mine began in 1990 and gold deposits were discovered in 1994. During the mine construction in 2005 and 2006, Lynden companies were an integral part of the construction effort. Prior to completion of the all-season road, Alaska West Express Project Manager Steve Willford, Al Guettinger and a crew of drivers were based in a small office near Delta Junction to coordinate the movement of building materials and supplies over the winter ice road to the mine site. Alaska West employees worked long days receiving inbound freight and consolidating loads to be positioned at the Quartz Lake staging area. Each morning the staged loads would be dispatched to move via the ice road to the mine site. This allowed the mine to receive supplies to support construction until the all-season road was opened.

Today, Lynden Transport collects freight and consolidates loads at its Fairbanks Service Center for twice weekly delivery to the mine (see above). Alaska West Express handles the heavy hauls and Alaska Marine Lines also handles barge needs from time to time. “It’s soup to nuts,” Ken says of the freight. “Alaska West Express hauls fuel, cement and heavy hauls and we move tires and other cargo. We also move freight for the companies supporting Pogo Mine like Redpath and water treatment and engineering companies. We make ourselves available for whatever is needed to support the mine’s 24-hour operation and 320 employees.”

Pogo Mine is located 38 miles northeast of Delta Junction. Access to the mine is via a 49-mile all-season road on the Richardson Highway. As Lynden drivers make their way up the narrow haul road, they check in at regular milepost intervals to assure safety and speed requirements are met. “We are not in a convenient location. The road narrows to one lane in some areas requiring radio communication and coordination,” Lorna explains. “We really appreciate Lynden’s dependable drivers and commitment to safety." 

The Pogo Mine has produced 3.1 million ounces of gold and is considered an example of mining done right. “Our success has been possible because of Lynden’s ongoing support,” Chris says. “They have been our partners from the early days and even before. We have had only one air shipment in the history of the mine. Everything else we need has been trucked in primarily by Lynden companies. We know we can rely on the friendly, day-in and day-out service Lynden provides.”

Tags: Lynden, Pogo Mine

Four-year refinery project completed in Canada

Posted on Wed, Apr 06, 2016

Over the past four years, approximately 14,000 shipments from all over the world arrived in Alberta, Canada for the construction of a bitumen refinery near the Kearl oil sands. Lynden International, Lynden Canada Co. and Canadian Lynden Transport provided support and logistics to engineering firm AMEC for the refinery project which included 12 Lynden employees in Edmonton and Calgary.

“The last four truckloads were delivered in late March, but over the past few years we moved everything from small packages to heaters weighing 150,000 pounds,” says Walter Rakiewich, Canadian Lynden Transport President.  The Lynden companies provided international freight forwarding, warehousing, just-in-time shipping and truck transportation from Calgary to the refinery site 70 miles outside Fort McMurray.  Most of the project was based at the Foster’s Wheeler’s Construction Staging Area (CSA) facility in Northern Alberta.  Freight came from all over the world via air, truck, rail and ship, all coordinated by Lynden International.

“I’ve never been involved in a project of this complexity and size and it was a great experience. I couldn’t have asked for a better group of employees to work with,” Walter says.  The project also affected the Canadian Lynden Transport crew as trucks were needed to haul  truckload, less-than-truckload and heavy haul loads. Walter singled out Dispatcher Deanna Benson as key to keeping things running smoothly during the busy project years.

AMEC_laydown_yard-Alberta_Canada.jpgLynden’s adaptability was a huge plus, according to Steve Foster, CSA Manager at Foster Wheeler. “Lynden provided great service to AMEC. Our ability to meet the contractors’ requirements was solely based on the excellent service provided by Lynden personnel at this facility.” He specifically noted Lynden’s ability to mobilize when priorities changed, the availability of trailers and other equipment and the availability of a dedicated driver to assist when the changes hit.

“After working on several of these projects in my career, this one stood out as the most successful because we had buy-in from the entire team on safety and service. That leads to success for both companies.”

In 2014, Lynden was selected from all of AMEC’s global business units as a recipient of the Beyond Zero Outstanding Achievement award for working 100,000 hours accident-free.  Lynden Administrative Assistant Candice Fox also received an award for exceptional dedication to the CSA team (see photo below).

With an established Canadian presence through Lynden Canada Co. and Canadian Lynden Transport, Lynden is ready to continue its support of Canada’s oil industry. “I think we all feel a great sense of accomplishment with the way this project turned out and great pride in our employees who made it a success,” says Randy Jackson, Lynden International Vice President.

Tags: Lynden International, Lynden, AMEC Construction, Canada, Lynden Canada Co., Canadian Lynden Transport

Lynden International appoints John Kaloper President

Posted on Tue, Dec 01, 2015

John KaloperLynden International, a full-service freight forwarding and logistics company, announces the appointment of John Kaloper as President. Kaloper succeeds David Richardson who retired Nov. 30 after 35 years with Lynden.

Kaloper began his career with Lynden International in 1984 as an account executive in the Seattle office. Over his 32 years with the company, John has served as district sales manager, regional manager, regional vice president and, most recently, Vice President of the company's America Division. His career has taken him on projects throughout Russia, Eastern Europe and Asia.

"John's three decades with the company, and his many leadership roles along the way, will serve him well as president," says Lynden Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Alex McKallor. "With his broad knowledge of both operations and sales, I am confident that he will continue to position Lynden International as a leader in the freight forwarding industry and ensure outstanding service to its customers."

Kaloper is a graduate of Central Washington University where he earned a degree in finance and business administration. Lynden International is part of the Lynden family of companies.

Tags: Lynden International, John Kaloper

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