Welcome to Lynden News!

Lynden supports WaveForm's U.S. growth

Posted on Tue, May 17, 2022

My project (100)Explosive growth in the diabetes care industry has ushered in many new products, including the Cascade Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) created by WaveForm, an international company developing innovations in wearable glucose monitoring devices. WaveForm's product is currently pending approval by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for distribution in the U.S. Until then, Lynden Logistics is coordinating ocean shipments of experimental assembly line machinery along with critical components in and out of Seattle and Portland.

"We moved our first shipment from Singapore to Seattle last year, and we are ready to support WaveForm as it grows into the U.S. market," says Ahmad Abed-Rabuh, General Manager at Lynden's Portland Service Center.

Currently, Lynden is shipping the sensors between the U.S., Vietnam, China and multiple countries in Western and Eastern Europe. Ahmad credited Lynden's Seattle and Portland international team members with their attention to detail and care in managing the sensitive and irreplaceable cargo. "This project has been challenging. Most is 'no touch' international commerce of shipper to consignee. We hope to secure more shipments as WaveForm increases its global shipments," he says.

WaveForm's unique patented sensor technology is already in use by diabetics in select international markets. The Cascade CGM system is based on pioneering work in glucose sensor technology and offers users a convenient way to view current glucose readings on a smartphone for up to 14 days.

The WaveForm team has been using Lynden's EZ Commerce system to dispatch shipments. "We had issues with shipment visibility with our previous carrier," says WaveForm Logistics Manager Mike Cordell. "Lynden's online tracing and tracking programs has been a great solution for us."

Tags: Lynden, Lynden Logistics, Project Logistics, Ocean, International

Aloha Marine Lines moves boats for Pacific Whale Foundation

Posted on Mon, Mar 14, 2022

boats (1)Aloha Marine Lines recently transported two large tour boats for the Pacific Whale Foundation. Celebrations sailed from Seattle followed by Ocean Legacy. The boats were craned off the barge at Barber's Point Harbor on Oahu. The larger boat is 80 feet long, 18 feet high and weighs 118,000 pounds.

"The boats were so large we hired vendors to assist with the lift and launch into the water," explains Joan Nacino, Pricing Business Analyst for Aloha Marine Lines. "Intermodal Coordinator Lauren Minckler responded to the initial request to move the boats, and Service Center Manager Zack Anderson and Freight Operations Gerry Bustamante assisted in putting the project together."

Upon arrival in Hawaii, Celebrations was taken to a boat repair yard located near Barber's Point harbor and the Aloha Marine Lines office. Ocean Legacy was launched from Barber's Point using a crane company and divers. Both boats join the Pacific Whale Foundation's fleet on Maui. The Foundation plans to purchase more boats from the same boat builder, Mavrik Marine, located in La Conner, WA.

Tags: Lynden, Hawaii, United States, Multi-Modal, Ocean, AML

A look back at the Kivalina Evacuation road and bridge project in Western Alaska

Posted on Tue, Feb 01, 2022

Kivalina BridgeAlthough all Lynden shipments are important, it's not every day that Alaska Marine Lines transports cargo used to build an evacuation bridge for an endangered Alaskan community. The long-awaited Kivalina Bridge, connecting the Western Alaska village of Kivalina to the mainland, was completed last spring by Lynden customer ASRC Civil Construction with support from Alaska Marine Lines.

For decades, the small coastal community of Kivalina has been working with a variety of agencies to address threats of coastal erosion and flooding. The bridge and an 8-mile gravel road are part of the Kivalina Evacuation and School Site Access Road project which provides residents an evacuation route in the event of a catastrophic storm or ocean surge.

"We first started talking about building a road and bridge for the community several years ago," says Mike Morris, Alaska Marine Lines Account Manager. "Now the road and bridge are done, and a replacement school project followed. We have moved building materials, equipment and other supporting freight for all three projects."

Getting freight to a remote village on a small spit of land is no small task. The projects required a combination of mainline barge sailings from Seattle and Anchorage to Nome, and from Nome, numerous landing craft voyages for additional inter-port moves. Each landing craft can transport up to 400 tons of cargo, which came in handy for the rock trucks, excavators and huge steel girders needed to build roads and the bridge.
Kivalina project, landing craft Nunaniq"We have worked with ASRC for many years, so we knew what was expected and got right to work building loads and coordinating sailings," Mike says. The first load of girders left Seattle aboard the landing craft Nunaniq. "It was a challenge to figure out how to load steel girders that were 104-feet long onto a landing craft with a 100-foot deck," says Brian Ward, Western Alaska Marine Operations Manager. "For me, that was the toughest piece of this move."

In Seattle, Brian, Tom Crescenzi, Zed Runyan and Oliver Zidek came up with a dolly system that bolted two girders together for the support needed for the 100-ton weight.

A long, cold winter presented another challenge for the crews. "That year we were fighting ice, and spring had been slow to come," Mike says. "Our summer season for serving Western Alaska and the surrounding villages starts in early April to mid-May, and even later in places like Kivalina above the Arctic Circle, but it's always contingent on Mother Nature."

Beginning with Bristol Bay, nine scheduled sailings, with multiple shuttle voyages, provided delivery to approximately 80 different coastal and river villages.

"We are happy to be a part of improving the quality of life and accessibility in remote locations. We pride ourselves on being able to help communities by bringing in needed equipment and supplies to complete civic projects, like the school improvements in Kivalina," Mike says.

Tags: Lynden, Alaska, Project Logistics, Multi-Modal, Ocean, Construction, AML

Freight gets white-glove treatment from Lynden

Posted on Thu, Jan 13, 2022

Lynden Los Angeles TeamRachael Ray is a big name in the cooking world, and her husband, co-host and business partner John Cusimano is also a well-known musician and founder of the band The Cringe. The couple recently renovated a villa in Tuscany that serves as a new home and studio for Cusimano. Lynden Logistics was asked to transport valuable musical instruments, mixing equipment and household items for the band and the show from Los Angeles to Genoa, Italy, this past fall.

“We wanted this air and ocean project to be a shining example of our value-add business,” explains James Bisho, Lynden’s Los Angeles Service Center Manager. “Although the equipment was in manufacturer packaging, we still had the items crated professionally to ensure that nothing was damaged or missing. Zero defects was the mantra, and everyone at Lynden did their part to make this happen. At our suggestion, Sam Jett, who is managing A/V and logistics for the villa project, came to our warehouse and meticulously went through his list of items for customs clearance in Italy. Being such a high-profile move, there was no room for error. All pieces were loaded into a sealed ocean container for added security.” With backlogs at seaports, the project was not without its challenges, according to Lynden Logistics Business Development Manager Maggie Parks. “The ocean carrier was delayed and the container was rolled on many sailings, but it finally made it into Genoa,” Parks explains. “Our goal was for John to simply unpack his gear in Tuscany, plug in and play, and for Rachael and her guests to have what they needed when they needed it.” Above photo from left, John Hollan of Fastforward Crating, and from the Lynden team James Bisho, Sam Jett and Maggie Parks.

Tags: Lynden Logistics, Air, Ocean, International

Lynden moves historic Austrian farmhouse to Canada

Posted on Tue, Jan 04, 2022

Farmhouse reassembled in Vernon, B.C.It took almost two years, but visitors to the Sparkling Hill Resort in Vernon, B.C. can now walk into a 16th century farmhouse originally built in the Alps to enjoy dinner. Pictured above, the farmhouse being reassembled in Vernon, B.C. 

Sparkling Hill Resort Project Manager Barry Jackson has built many structures at the resort over the years, including a unique glass and steel teepee, but he was surprised at the complex process involved in moving the centuries-old farmhouse, timber by timber and container by container, across an ocean and by the expertise provided by Lynden Logistics to make it happen.

austria movePictured right, the 1587 farmhouse was originally located in Weerberg, Tyrol, Austria. The owner of Sparkling Hill Resort, Gernot Langes-Swarovski of Swarovski Crystal, heard about it and decided he would like to move it to Canada as a special attraction at the resort. Engineers took it down piece by-piece and delivered it to a warehouse in Austria where they cleaned hundreds of years of dirt and moss off the hand-hewn timbers. Each was meticulously numbered for future reassembly. The timbers were placed into five different open-top containers for the ocean voyage from the Port of Antwerp to Vancouver, B.C., all coordinated through Lynden Logistics.

The shipment would prove to be a challenge. “Not all five containers were loaded on the same vessel as planned,” explains Elodie Gergov, Lynden’s International Manager in Seattle. “This created issues with Canadian customs upon arrival in Vancouver, accentuated by issues with the fumigation certificates. These delays caused storage issues and mounting charges at the port. We reduced the financial impact of these costs for our customer by moving the containers in-bond until things were sorted out and the customs clearance was processed.”

Next, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) required an onsite inspection for each container at the exact time it was delivered to the resort in Vernon. “We overcame all these challenges, but the last hurdle was the longest and the toughest,” Elodie explains. “This project took place right when the world went on pandemic lockdown. By the time the cargo arrived, the carpenters and engineers that took apart the farmhouse in Austria could not travel to Canada to reassemble it.”

Eventually, restrictions eased, and the Austrian carpenters arrived in Canada to reassemble what is now called Gerni’s Farmhouse. It took four men 10 days to reassemble the building. Now, the restaurant is open, and a spa is planned for the upstairs of the building. “For those who have never been to Europe, Gerni’s Farmhouse provides an opportunity to experience authentic Austrian dining and a bit of time travel, too,” Jackson says.

“International shipping is always exciting due to its complexities and challenges,” Elodie says. “Managing one-of-a-kind projects like this makes my job even more rewarding. Lynden teams in Seattle and Canada worked together to make it happen.”

Tags: Canada, Lynden Logistics, Ocean

Lynden mariners keep waters and people safe

Posted on Fri, Sep 03, 2021

Greta crew long shotLynden's captains, engineers, mates and deck hands do more than just deliver freight via barge, landing craft and tugboat. These mariners are the eyes and ears on the waters they sail, often being called upon to assist in emergency situations and to report on marine conditions for other vessels.

Just last month on the Kuskokwim River, the Bering Marine crew of the landing craft Greta pulled a man to safety after he fell off a seawall, while the crews of the Arctic Bear and Padilla assisted U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hickory with safe navigation of the river channel.

According to Brandon Leary, Alaska Marine Trucking's Bethel Service Center Manager, "I was getting ready for bed and my wife, Alyssa, actually saw the man fall in the river. I ran down with a life ring that I keep on my deck, and I had my wife alert the crew on the Greta while I assisted the man in the water." The Greta crew responded with a Jacob's ladder boarding device, then contacted emergency crews who met the tug on shore and transported the man to a local hospital.

"The City of Bethel would like to extend thanks and appreciation to the Greta crew," says Bethel City Manager Peter Williams. Police Lieutenant Jesse Poole also expressed thanks for the quick actions of the crew, which includes Captain Mike Dawson, Engineer Clint Mathews, Mates Chris Benny and Fred Haag, and Deckhands Anthony Augusto and Manny Belarmino.

"Those of us who live and work on vessels must always be prepared to expect the unexpected," says Captain Jack Rasmussen, Bering Marine Vice President. "We routinely perform safety drills so our crews know how to act and what to possibly expect during an incident. These drills are a regulatory requirement but also essential to protect our crews and equipment. We are proud of the Greta crew for their lifesaving actions in a Man Overboard (MOB) situation."

Another Bering Marine vessel was on the same river providing crucial navigation information so the U.S. Coast Guard could mark the channel with seasonal buoys. This is a yearly task as the channel changes each year.

"The Arctic Bear tug was running the river as soon as the ice went out this year," explains Port Engineer Steve Isaacs. "The crew developed a good track line by using a skiff they launch off the tug, help from locals in the area, and from Captain David Curtis on Bering Marine's pilot boat Padilla."

When the USCGC Hickory arrived in June, the crew reached out to Captain Chuck Gaffney on the Arctic Bear. He provided track lines for the 2021 channel and the location of shoals and sandbars to mark with buoys for safe navigation. In addition to Captain Gaffney, crew members include Engineer Sean Brooks and Mates Joe Pirak and Dave Smith.

Hickory Captain and Commanding Officer Jeannette Greene reached out to the crew with a thank you for the yearly assistance. "I sincerely appreciate your help with river information, soundings and shoaling each year," she writes. The Hickory crew marked buoy 28 with a small bear in appreciation of the Arctic Bear and its crew.

Tags: Bering Marine Corporation, Lynden Employees, Safety, Alaska, Ocean

Lynden innovations and equipment make for calm seas

Posted on Tue, Aug 31, 2021

Lynden is known for providing innovative solutions to its customers. In a new twist on the term 'holding pen,' Lynden created a specially designed rack to hold surfboards for damage-free ocean transit. "There will always be a market for surfboards in Hawaii," explains Los Angeles Service Center Manager James Bisho, "so why not be the leader in providing cutting-edge transportation from the mainland to the islands?"

Lynden handles just about any type of freight imaginable from Los Angeles to Hawaii - from heavy machinery to perishable fruit to solar panels - via both air and ocean, full-container-load (FCL) and less-than-container-load (LCL). Coby Peterson of Marko Foam Products approached Lynden about shipping foam surfboard 'blanks' from LAX to Honolulu knowing they would be stowed in a container, but he didn't expect a special rack designed for just his freight. Lynden's Business Development Manager Maggie Parks couldn't wait to take Peterson's call. "I knew we could help him with this unique product," she says. "We thrive on and excel at requests like this. We are very good at creating solutions and showing nimbleness with how we can handle freight."

Lynden's 40-foot containers are equipped with Kinedyne Kaptive Beam® decking systems that can be adjusted at multiple levels to stack freight in a variety of configurations. The specialized containers are the only ones available in Hawaii and, with containers now in short supply, the 'sea cans' expand Lynden's shipping capacity at a critical time. My Post - 2021-11-24T102634.710

"With the Kaptive Beam® system, we can carry more cargo per container. Customers save time and money and realize increased value with every load," Parks explains. "I am receiving positive feedback from our surfboard customers on this new option for surfboards and blanks. We have taken a collaborative approach, finding better ways of packing and moving the boards."

"Lynden has greatly increased our business on the Hawaiian Islands by providing a reliable and cost-effective shipping method to better serve our customers," says Peterson, Marko's Manager of Business Development and Marketing.

Besides Marko Foam Products, based in Huntington Beach, CA, Lynden is now handling shipping for other California companies including Catch Surf and Pyzel Surfboards. Pyzel, a leading global surfboard manufacturer, is moving full containers of boards and blanks to Honolulu inside Lynden's Kaptive Beam®-configured containers.

Lynden is well-known as one of the largest providers of air freight forwarding between the mainland and Hawaii, but it's now gaining recognition for ocean service with a variety of LCL options. The multi-mode capabilities of choosing barge, steamship or air and mixing the modes to speed up or slow down delivery for changing timelines and budgets is a selling point.

"Our service levels give us multiple layers of experience and options to offer customers," explains Stuart Nakayama, Lynden Vice President of Trade Lane Development. "Ocean LCL has always been a part of our service, but things really took off last year when we added our containers equipped with the Kaptive Beam® system, which allows us to manage our loads more effectively and price competitively. We can mix and match heavy, odd-sized loads, double-stack and handle just about anything - from tall pallets of odd-sized freight like surfboard blanks, to smaller pieces."

With backed up ports, slowed supply chains, and a shortage of containers, ocean shipping has been anything but smooth sailing this year. "The ocean shipping industry is still feeling the effects of the pandemic. It's like a snake trying to eat a rabbit," Nakayama says. "Log jams at port of entry are still occurring and impacting the Southern California market. It used to take four days to get large vessels unloaded, reloaded and leaving the port. Now it takes weeks. In my 33 years in the industry, this is unprecedented. As the experts, we are here to help our customers navigate these sometimes choppy waters and make sure we take care of their logistics needs." 

Despite the current challenges, Lynden employees still manage to pull off wins for customers on a routine basis. Recently Lynden's Los Angeles team worked through a weekend after an urgent shipment arrived after deadline on a Friday night. They knew their customers at a well-known grocer had a division vice president arriving on Monday to inspect the store. The bagged salads had to be on the refrigerated shelf when he arrived. So they flagged the perishable freight, quickly split the cargo, prepared the documents and booked space on the first available flights. The store passed the inspection.

"Whether it's working overtime, creating new ways to protect freight, or offering the latest and best equipment to ship that freight across the Pacific, we are always thinking of our customers," Nakayama says, "even if it means building holding pens for surfboards!" 

Tags: Hawaii, Retail, Multi-Modal, Ocean

Alaska Marine Lines increases capacity with 600 new containers

Posted on Wed, Aug 11, 2021

AML containersThis spring, the M/V Saga Welco Indiana departed the port of Qingdao, China, with 600 new refrigerated shipping containers on their way to be put into service at Alaska Marine Lines. These units are the latest addition to Alaska Marine Lines' fleet of nearly 29,000 shipping containers, flats and tanks. While they will primarily be used for transporting seafood products from Alaska, they will also carry all types of temperature controlled products.

"The story of how the containers made their way into service with AML is noteworthy," says Purchasing Manager Jay Marchand. Eastbound global steamship space was in short supply and prices were rising. Alaska Marine Lines collaborated with Lynden Logistics to export the containers from China and charter a ship to bring them east. Lead by International Manager Elodie Gergov, the Lynden Logistics team worked on the release from Chinese customs while Jay and AML's Steve Hardin worked with the container factory on specifications, pricing, inspections and production schedule.

With five days to go before the containers were scheduled to be loaded onto the ship, everything was on track for departure. But, at the eleventh hour, the Lynden team identified an unforeseen gap in port documentation and port release fees. On Friday afternoon of a Chinese holiday week, Lynden's local agent was asked to help clarify the issues. "By being there in person and having local contacts, the agent was able to act on behalf of both Lynden companies and clear the way for the containers to be delivered to the port," Jay says. "The ship successfully departed with all 600 containers and arrived in Dutch Harbor 10 days later."

The next challenge came at the offloading in Dutch Harbor. Alaska Marine Lines contracted with a company to perform the stevedoring using local labor. Due to a high demand of labor and a shortage of workers between fish seasons, only 50 percent of that labor was available, and the delays were counting against AML's contracted detention time. With the threat of the ship being detained another week before it could finish unloading, AML sought the assistance of Alaska Marine Trucking equipment operators, Bering Marine tugboat crews, and local AML Dutch Harbor operations employees to help unload the ship using the ship's gantry cranes. Once the ship was anchored in the bay, two AML barges were brought alongside the M/V Indiana and the Lynden team unloaded directly onto the barge decks.

"While the container purchase had many unexpected challenges, it was the access to logistics professionals and their perseverance that allowed the project to succeed," Jay says. As Elodie put it, "The world of international shipping is very unpredictable, but we never give up and always do our best."

Tags: Seafood, Alaska, Lynden Logistics, Grocery Chill and Frozen, Temperature-Controlled, Ocean, AML

Aloha Marine Lines transports heaviest cargo load yet to Hawaii

Posted on Wed, Mar 24, 2021

AML barge loadingAloha Marine Lines Voyage H0497W, which departed in December last year, carried the heaviest cargo load Aloha Marine Lines has ever transported from Seattle to Hawaii. According to Aloha Marine Lines Seattle Service Center Manager Tom Crescenzi, the Namakani barge was close to its maximum. "We still have a little more tonnage we could get on board, but not much. The barge capacity is 16,850 tons and the sailing carried 13,158 tons of cargo plus the weight of the containers, dunnage, etc." With 691 picks and 1,032 TEU it was an impressive load. Aloha Marine Lines purchased two large barges from Sause Brothers last year that enabled the Hawaii capacity expansion.

Tags: Hawaii, Ocean, AML

Locomotives all arrive safely by barge in Skagway

Posted on Fri, Jan 15, 2021

My Post - 2021-11-24T131911.132Recently the Whittier Provider and the Bering Titan delivered two locomotives to Skagway for the White Pass & Yukon Route Railway. This delivery completed the transport of six new locomotives to replace the old fleet which was built in the 1960s. Weighing in at 265,000 pounds each, the new engines are 30 percent larger than the old. Their size required a special rail sailing of Alaska Marine Lines' Southeast Provider last year when the first replacement engines were brought to Alaska.

"All the locomotives were transported on special barges that feature tracks on the barge deck designed to move rail cars," says Skagway Service Center Manager Cory Bricker. The new locomotives were built by National Railway Equipment Company in Mount Vernon, IL then shipped to Seattle.

Alaska Marine Lines has moved locomotives for the railway before using a heavy-duty dolly as a means of transport. The dolly and locomotive 'package' were stowed onto the deck of a regular barge, which allowed for maneuvering upon arrival. This time, the locomotives rode the rail barges and were unloaded by crane for placement on the White Pass railway.

"These locomotives are valued at about $2.5 million each so everyone was invested in making sure the move went smoothly and safely," Cory says.

Dubbed the scenic railway of the world, the White Pass & Yukon Route Railway covers 68 miles of breathtaking scenery between Skagway and Carcross, Yukon Territory.

Tags: Alaska, Oversized/Heavy Haul, Ocean, AML