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Juneau driver’s fast actions prevent damages and injury

Posted on Wed, Jun 19, 2019

Alaska Marine Trucking DriverThe quick response of new Alaska Marine Trucking Driver Andrew Lawson saved company equipment and prevented the loss of three new cars belonging to a customer. Alaska Marine Trucking delivers vehicles to an auto dealership in Juneau twice weekly, year-round, with a specialized car-hauling trailer. Andrew was on the road to the dealership when he heard a loud ‘BOOM!’ He saw flames in his rear view mirror, pulled over and saw the trailer was on fire. The brakes of the trailer overheated and the brake drum blew in a fiery explosion. This, in turn, caught the inside trailer tire on fire, destroying it.

Andrew grabbed the fire extinguisher from his truck and quickly put out the flames. After the incident, he inspected all the gear and freight involved, and called his dispatcher. Fortunately Andrew and the cargo being transported were unharmed. Dispatcher Carolyn Smith contacted the dealership, and Andrew was able to unload the cars safely to complete delivery to the customer. "Thanks to his quick thinking and actions, Andrew saved the customer's shipment and Alaska Marine Lines what might have been a total loss of our equipment. I would like to recognize him for using his safety training, quick thinking and fast actions to save a disaster from happening," Carolyn says.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden employees, Safety, Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Drivers

Life-saving customer service

Posted on Thu, Jun 06, 2019

Anchorage teamOver the 17 years that Lynden International Senior Account Executive Randy Main has been working with customers, he has handled many emergency shipments. "Every so often we get a shipment with a story behind it and a face behind the package," he says. In this case, it was a pharmaceutical shipment for McKesson, a long-time Lynden customer.

McKesson's Distribution Center Manager Jonathan Burke wrote a letter about Randy's customer service and extraordinary efforts to ensure a lifesaving drug reached critically ill patients in Kotzebue, AK. "I looked up flights going to Kotzebue and the only one was leaving that afternoon," Jon writes. "I immediately reached out to Randy and asked if we could somehow get this drug on that flight. Within minutes of the call, Randy arrived to pick up the package and was on the phone to see what he could do to get the package tendered on Alaska Airlines. Through his efforts, he was able to hold the plane and get the package onboard."

With only minutes until departure and well past the carrier’s cutoff, Lynden’s Owen Mitchell and Matt Kelly started the paperwork while Main contacted the flight crew to ask if they could coordinate an after-hours handoff with the hospital in Kotzebue. Hours later, the life-saving medication arrived and was administered to the patient, a baby suffering from meningitis, and other children in the household. "I am deeply grateful to have Randy as our account manager who showed great heroism on our behalf," Jonathan says.

"We have so many pharmaceutical shipments going out each morning and each one could potentially contain life-saving medication," Randy explains. "With more than 30 shipments a day, we contend with the daily challenge of limited flights and carrier options, weather delays, and a variety of seasonal issues. McKesson was in a tough situation, and I'm glad that we could help along with our partners at Alaska Airlines who held the plane and allowed the freight to be tendered past the normal cutoff period. Alaska can be a challenging place to live and work. I'm proud of our Lynden team for the role they played in recognizing the need and going above and beyond to help."

Tags: Lynden International, Solutions, Shipping in Alaska

Lynden Transport supports REI relocation

Posted on Thu, Apr 11, 2019

Lynden Transport truckA cross-town move from one REI store to another went off without a hitch thanks to Lynden Transport’s Anchorage team and experienced drivers.

All retail merchandise from the previous store location in Anchorage was transported to the new, bigger facility in Midtown Mall within a few days. "Some of the gear was palletized and some of it was loosely stacked. REI even left apparel on the clothing racks and rolled them right onto the trailers," explains Northwest Regional Sales Manager John Husby. "The only thing we didn’t move were the lighting fixtures."

In addition to the store-to-store freight, Lynden drivers loaded up trailers at REI’s distribution center in Sumner, WA, with additional merchandise to stock the 50,000-square-foot space. Sumner is the usual pickup location for both Fairbanks and Anchorage REI stores. Lynden Transport drivers drop the trailers for loading at the center, then take them the rest of the way north via ship. Trailers for Fairbanks go via rail and are then intercepted for truck delivery to the REI store. Kayaks and canoes sometimes ride the rail barge, according to John, and Alaska Marine Lines barges are often used for larger freight.

John attended the store’s soft opening in January. "Everything was in the store and everyone was all smiles. "Lynden’s support for our relocation was invaluable to us," says Sarah Chadd, REI Logistics Supply Chain Analyst.

Tags: Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Lynden Transport, Drivers

Juneau deliveries support salmon hatchery and Alaska fishing community

Posted on Fri, Jun 01, 2018

JNU fish delivery tankerTom Greinier has been hauling fish for Juneau's salmon hatchery, Douglas Island Pink And Chum (DIPAC), for over 20 years. In fact, DIPAC has followed Tom during his trucking career even before he started working for Alaska Marine Trucking. "He's the reason we haul fish for them at all," says fellow Driver Brian Weokoluk. "They specifically ask for him year after year."

Not only have Tom's skills behind the wheel led to a long-lasting customer relationship, his commitment to working around DIPAC's schedule has fed Juneau's waters with predictable salmon spawn while supporting the fishing community.

Alaska Marine Trucking Driver Jim Cartmill is a member of the DIPAC Board of Directors. "Trucking live fish from one point to another is crucial in the hatchery's success," he says. "They're raised at Macaulay until they're about 3 inches long, and then hauled off to an ocean pen where they mature and are released into open water. DIPAC is a huge support to both our local and intra-state communities."

According to Brian, the reason DIPAC trusts only a select few to truck live fish is all in the gear shifting during transport. The drive must be as smooth as possible for the least amount of disruption to the fish. If the gear changing rocks the holding tanks too much during the drive, it can cause air bubbles in the tankers that may stress or even kill the small fish fry.

Fortunately, that's not a worry with professionals like Tom in the driver's seat. This spring he took some time to talk another of Alaska Marine Trucking's experienced drivers through the process for their first run to the Thane Road site with a DIPAC employee.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Lynden employees, Shipping in Alaska, Drivers

Trucking a 75,000 lb spool? All in a day's work.

Posted on Tue, Oct 12, 2010

This 75,000-pound tubing spool is headed north on the Dalton Highway via Alaska West Express. According to Project Specialist Steve Willford, this particular spool for customer Nabors Drilling was lighter than usual.

Nabors Drilling spool


The larger tubing spools are 15 feet in diameter and range in weight from 55,000 to 90,000 pounds, depending on the type of tubing. Alaska West Express has moved specialized coils, both on round spools and on more specialized work reels, with weights ranging from 100,000 to 120,000 pounds. The heavier spools are transported on lowboys with additional axles to distribute the weight.

 “We regularly haul tubing spools that come into our yard on rail cars. They are unloaded and stored for transport to the North Slope as needed,” he explains. “Our primary customer is Schlumberger, but we also have occasional spools that belong to Nabors Drilling.”

The smaller tubing spools measure 135 inches in diameter and weigh 40,000 to 45,000 pounds. “This is just another day’s work for most of our yard workers and drivers,” Steve says. “This is the type of service we provide our customers on an everyday basis.”

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Shipping in Alaska, Dalton Highway, Alaska, Oversize freight

CH2M Hill utilizes Lynden for time-sensitive freight.

Posted on Fri, May 21, 2010

This spring CH2M Hill needed a drill rig transported from Kenai to Prudhoe Bay within 48 hours. The catch: the rig consisted of 21 loads - all hot shot.

The Lynden crew in Kenai quickly mobilized for the two-day rush. Customer Service Representative Danette Goode and Operations Manager Boyd Jorgensen set to work on the load-out. Service Center Manager John Jansen handled details at the Prudhoe Bay Service Center.

"This was a super fast track move and, at 21 loads, quite a challenge," says Lynden Transport Account Manager Sam Amato. "We couldn't have done it without the efforts of Boyd and Danette."

Boyd, in turn, recognized drivers Jason Toliver, David Martinsen and Rusty Deckard for their dedication to getting the loads on the road. "They made sure everything arrived smoothly on-site," he says. Kenai Service Center Manager Kyle Fisher summed it up, saying "Great employees and teamwork are what make Lynden so effective in situations like this. Everyone has a positive attitude and is willing to work together to make it happen for our customers."

CH2M Hill - Drill rig move
(One of the 21 CH2M Hill loads arrives in Prudhoe Bay)

Sam was at Prudhoe Bay when the first loads arrived and later met with the CH2M Hill team that had flown in to assemble the drill rig. "They came to us with a very time-sensitive project and trusted us to get it done," he says. "In the oil business, idle equipment costs money. They were extremely happy that Lynden was able to meet the challenge."

When the project was complete, Lynden moved the rig south from Prudhoe Bay to Nikiski, Alaska, for CH2M Hill. The project required 26 loads this time, instead of 21, due to road and weight restrictions. Loads went from Prudhoe to the Fairbanks yard where Lynden split them into smaller sizes for the final leg to Kenai-Nikiski.

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How's your work commute? Sam Amato sent in this photo looking down the haul road (Dalton Highway, connecting Livengood to Deadhorse over 414 miles).

Haul Road - Dalton Highway

Tags: Heavy Haul, Lynden, Prudhoe Bay, Oil Industry, Shipping in Alaska, Drilling Rig, Lynden Transport

The Flying Bishop's plane gets a lift to Fairbanks

Posted on Wed, Apr 07, 2010

A yellow Piper PA-20 hangs from the roof of the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center in Fairbanks, Alaska. The plane brings back fond memories for those who knew the pilot. From 1948 to 1974, Episcopal Bishop Bill Gordon was known as Alaska's Flying Bishop. He earned his reputation by transporting supplies and people as he flew to villages and performed religious services. He married people, christened babies and saved lives by flying the sick and injured to hospitals.

Flying Bishop Bill Gordon
(The Flying Bishop Bill Gordon)

Last year, the plane was sitting in Juneau in need of a ride. Lynden Transport offered to move it to Fairbanks where it could be restored to resemble the one flown by the late Bishop Bill Gordon. Shirley Gordon, Bill's 86-year-old widow, was there when the plane was lifted into place at the cultural center in Fairbanks. A dedication ceremony is planned this year.

Bishop Plane being unloaded
(The Flying Bishop's plane being unloaded)

The Flying Bishop is immortalized in the book "Angel on his Wing" by Tay Thomas and the movie "The Light of the North" produced by the Episcopal Church. The movie shows Bishop Bill visiting Alaska missions in 1951.


"From the Lynden Archives": This article was originally written in February 2010.

Tags: Shipping in Alaska, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Lynden Archives

Lynden delivers H1N1 vaccine throughout Alaska

Posted on Tue, Mar 02, 2010

Lynden International was entrusted with some mighty important cargo this past fall and winter. The State of Alaska selected Lynden as the distributor for the H1N1 flu vaccine to various locations around the state. Since mid-October, Lynden has moved around 500 shipments of nine different types of vaccine.H1N1 vaccine pickup by Lynden

Handling the temperature-sensitive packages is a huge responsibility. Lynden's knowledge of Alaska and its experience delivering to just about anywhere is paying off with not a single shipment late or missed. The distribution points range from larger cities where truck delivery is the norm to smaller villages where bush pilots deliver the vaccine to someone waiting on the ground.

The vaccine is flown into Anchorage and repackaged for local deliveries. Lynden's EZ Commerce tracking system has been a big help in keeping track of daily shipments. Lynden follows up each delivery with a phone call to verify

"From the Lynden Archives": This story was originally written in December 2009.

Tags: Lynden International, Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska, Lynden Archives

Video: "Alaska Hovercraft - Subzero temperatures, no roads, no excuses."

Posted on Mon, Oct 26, 2009

Have you seen the video for Alaska Hovercraft (part of the Lynden family of companies)? They deliver mail and freight from Bethel, Alaska to villages in the Y-K Delta...over land, snow, or water!

 

Note: Sorry for reposting this (it was originally posted a week or so ago), but the link to the video changed and I wanted to keep everyone up-to-date. Thanks!

Tags: Hovercraft, Shipping in Alaska, Alaska Hovercraft, Alaska

"Choosing the right freight shipping company"

Posted on Thu, Sep 03, 2009

I recently came across an article titled "Avoid Inconveniences By Choosing The Right Freight Shipping Company", written by Amy Nutt. The article provides a good list of what you should look for in a reliable shipping company (like Lynden).  =-)

Here is a quick list of the important points. If you'd like to learn more, you can read the full article.

  •  Choose a company that can help you balance delivery speed and cost. A shipper that can offer you the choice to ship by truck, ship by barge, or ship by plane can give you better cost/speed options.
  • Check on a company's track record. Have they been around for a while (valuable experience)? What do their customers say about them? How helpful are their employees when you contact them?
  • If you are shipping internationally, ensure that the company has experience and knowledge of the different laws and guidelines that exist abroad.
The article also mentions shopping around for the best price. I would add that you should understand what the real cost of shipping is - it's not just the rate you are quoted. A lower price is not helpful if your freight arrives late or damaged. If the shipper is unreliable, how much time will you have to spend checking-up on your freight? Is the shipper experienced? If so, they likely can help provide advice on how to better or more cheaply ship your freight.

Any tips you would like to add? Leave a comment below!

Tags: Lynden International, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping, Shipping in Alaska, Alaska shipping, Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska

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