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Lynden delivers PPE to frontline medical workers in Alaska

Posted on Fri, Sep 25, 2020

Lynden delivers PPEEarlier this year Northern Star Resources Limited, owner of the Pogo Gold Mine, donated $1.5 million worth of medical personal protective equipment (PPE) to Alaska communities with a focus on Fairbanks and the delta regions. Lynden International arranged customs clearance and Lynden Transport delivered the supplies to the communities which were then distributed by Foundation Health partners to doctors, dentists and health providers who have been unable to secure PPE on their own. "We value our partnership with Lynden and appreciate the help distributing these supplies," says Wendie MacNaughton, External Affairs Manager for Northern Star. The shipment, which was the largest donation received from private industry, included 12,500 isolation gowns, 100,000 N95 masks and 400,000 surgical masks. "Lynden International employees were glad we could assist Northern Star-Pogo navigate the import challenges that come with these PPE imports, and we're extremely grateful for their generous donation to Alaskan health care providers," says Keith Hall, Licensed Customs Broker for Lynden International in Anchorage.

Tags: Lynden International, Lynden employees, Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Alaska Marine Lines rail barges upgrade ballast systems

Posted on Wed, Aug 05, 2020

Alaska Marine Lines rail barge Four Alaska Marine Lines rail barges are getting new piping and ballast systems designed by marine industry leader Glosten with installation by Meridian Marine Industries. "The rail barges are hitting 20 years of service and were in need of some upgrades," explains John Maketa, T-115 Port Engineer in Seattle. "These barges are the backbone of our rail operations and Central Alaska service. The updates will prepare them for another 20 years of service."

Two barges, the Anchorage Provider and Whittier Provider, already have the new piping systems installed. The Fairbanks Provider is scheduled for updates in August and the Nana Provider sometime next year. Using a patented rack system, the rail barges transport containers and rail cars from Seattle to Whittier, AK where the rail cars are rolled onto the train tracks.

The ballast systems are a network of valves, pipes and pumps below deck on all Alaska Marine Lines rail barges. The tanks are filled with fresh water to trim the barge before sailing. With six 1,200-ton ballast tanks on each barge, a total weight of 2,400 tons of water is moved between tanks to trim the barge for efficient towing.

Each rail barge is receiving the following services and updates:

Robot removing paint
  • New ballast system, including all valves and actuators. An actuator is an attached electrical motor that allows the valves to be operated and monitored remotely. The operations crews can operate the system from on deck without going into the pump room.
  • System modifications to add ballast water treatment systems in the future.
  • New wave wall doors to protect the generator.
  • Rebuilt valves in the spill containment system with modifications that will allow inspection and repair in the future.
  • Removal of excessive hull paint built up by 20 years of paint jobs. Pictured right, a robot removes old paint from the hull of the Anchorage Provider at SeaSpan Drydock in Vancouver, B.C.
  • Removal of generators for complete inspections and replacement of worn parts.
  • Fuel tanks cleaned and refurbished.
  • Complete recoating of all ballast tanks.

"John has done a great job coordinating these updates, including planning, vendor selection, material logistics and scheduling with operations for maintenance windows to work on the four barges," says Marine Maintenance Manager David Byrne. "We are known for our exceptionally well-maintained and reliable equipment and these upgrades and renovations allow us to maintain that reputation with our customers."

Tags: Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska

Lynden Transport on the build with Sprung Industries

Posted on Wed, Jul 01, 2020

Lynden Transport delivery in FairbanksLynden Transport is delivering materials for a project at Fort Wainwright military base near Fairbanks, AK this spring and summer. Drivers are hauling 58 loads of large tent frames and insulation from Salt Lake City and Calgary for the construction of seven buildings on base for customer Sprung Industries. According to Lynden Transport Regional Sales Manager Tony Vitoff, DynCorp International is handling the construction and Sprung Industries is supplying the materials. Loads are moving over the highway or water depending on construction timeline requirements and are being coordinated through Lynden Transport's Portland and Fairbanks Service Centers.

"Lynden Transport has gone the extra mile to support the Wainwright project by staging structures in their yard until we need them on site," says Gary Smith, DynCorp International (DI) Project Manager. "DI appreciates this kind of support which is critical to our collective success."

Tags: Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Lynden Transport delivers new classrooms to Kaktovik, AK

Posted on Wed, May 20, 2020

Modular building on truckLynden Transport Driver James Delowsky (right) hauled a modular building from Edmonton to Kaktovik, AK to serve as a classroom for students after the school burned down in February. Kaktovik is a Native Alaskan Village along the Arctic Coast of the Beaufort Sea with a population of 250. The school and gym were the heart and hub of the community, according to JD Lavender, Branch Operations Leader for Willscot, Lynden's customer.

"The nearest school is 150 miles away so we need to get these buildings delivered as soon as possible," he says. "I have been impressed with the Lynden team and the drivers' attention to safety." Lynden moved 12 modules from Edmonton and 13 from Wasilla to Deadhorse. From there, they were transported to the remote village by Rolligons outfitted with special tires designed for the sensitive tundra.

Tags: Trucking, Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska, Drivers

Lynden employees keep the freight moving

Posted on Fri, Apr 24, 2020

Lynden employeeLynden employees are stepping forward to meet the needs of customers, keeping the freight moving as Lynden companies have always done during difficult times. Lynden has maintained regular business operations since the COVID-19 situation arose in late February with no disruption to global shipments or supply chains.

"The safety of our people and serving our customers are our priorities during these challenging times. We've been keeping freight moving to Alaska since 1954, and we're not planning to stop now," says Chairman Jim Jansen. "Lynden companies provide critical cargo services throughout Alaska and beyond and we are committed to delivering essential supplies and services to our customers and communities."

Lynden barges, trucks and planes deliver cargo to all points in Alaska including providing a supply lifeline to much of the state whose only surface supply line is Lynden and its dedicated people. "Our customers need our support to keep their businesses operating during this time and we are also supporting state and federal agencies. Keeping delivery routes open and supplies moving is our main focus and goal," explains Lynden President Jon Burdick. "We have dealt with earthquakes, oil spills, floods and other obstacles. This situation is no different."

According to Alaska Marine Trucking President Scott Hicks, employees are demonstrating the Lynden can-do attitude each day. "I have been so proud of our teams in Alaska," he says. "They are a shining example of the personal commitment required to keep businesses open and the economy moving. I know Lynden employees are doing the same in all locations."

Safety is one of Lynden's core values and many protocols have been implemented to ensure employees are operating in a safe and secure manner throughout all Lynden areas. Lynden's safety teams maintain active communication with local and federal agencies and comply with recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control.

"No transportation company in Alaska has a more essential and critical responsibility than we do," Jim says. "Without our service, many Alaskans would not have food and the other items essential to life. We can only meet their needs if our people are healthy, which is our No. 1 priority."

"As this situation unfolds, we are striving to offer a calm port in the storm by continuing to do our jobs as usual," Jon says. "Lynden has always responded in times of need and this is, unfortunately, one of those times. We are grateful for our dedicated employees who are dealing with additional challenges in their everyday work. They are the ones who allow us to serve our customers with minimal disruption."Lynden employee

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Lynden employees, Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska

Hydroelectric project will move Kake off diesel power

Posted on Thu, Feb 13, 2020

Kake Pipestock projectConstruction is under way for a new hydropower facility in Kake, AK and Alaska Marine Lines is supporting the project by transporting penstock pipe and other materials. Local electrical utility Inside Passage Electric Cooperative (IPEC) is building the facility at an old hatchery near town. The plant will allow the community of 630 people to move from diesel power and generators to a cheaper, cleaner and more efficient power source. It's estimated that the new plant will save 2 million pounds of CO2 per year. According to Arrowhead Transfer Operations Manager Adam Davis, the first shipment of pipe was delivered last summer, but the project has been in the works for more than a year. "We started working on the project in 2018 with contractor Rock N Road," he says. "We've already handled 60 loads of concrete and aggregate weighing between 20,000 to 66,000 pounds each to build pillars, thrust block and other features." Many of the deliveries tested Adam's driving skills as they required backing a fully loaded 40-foot trailer down a long, one-lane driveway. The trailer was too wide for the narrow bridge so the excavator was used to unload the pipe at the job site.

IPEC is scheduled to finish the $10 million project this year. Pictured above, 54-inch penstock pipe is stacked for delivery at the Alaska Marine Lines yard in Kake.

Tags: Barge, Arrowhead Transfer, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska

Alaska Marine Lines expands Western Alaska service to Arctic ports

Posted on Mon, Nov 19, 2018

Alaska Marine LinesAlaska Marine Lines, an Alaska marine transportation company, is expanding its service from Seattle and Anchorage to the Arctic Region in 2019. Bowhead Transport will provide the destination services at the North Slope villages of Point Hope, Point Lay, Wainwright, Utqiagvik (Barrow), and Kaktovik. Alaska Marine Lines will also service Deadhorse with its two annual sealifts. Bowhead, thru its teaming agreement with Alaska Marine Lines, will continue to participate in the door-to-shore service to the Arctic that it initiated over 30 years ago.

The new stops will be added to Alaska Marine Lines’ many ports of call, joining the major hubs of Naknek, Dillingham, Nome, Bethel and Kotzebue and more than 65 villages along the coast of Western Alaska.

“Adding these new locations allows us to meet our goal of serving the entire state of Alaska, from Ketchikan to Kaktovik. From April to October each year we bring essential supplies to local villages in Western Alaska and provide critical support to the seafood industry,” says Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson. “Bowhead Transport has been serving Alaska for decades and we are proud to team with them to continue to provide the excellent service their customers depend on.”

For more information or to book a shipment, contact Alaska Marine Lines at 800-426-3113 or westernakcs@lynden.com.

Tags: Western Alaska, Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska, Bowhead Transport, Arctic Alaska

Alaska Marine Lines brings new school buses to Kenai Peninsula

Posted on Fri, Jan 12, 2018

School Buses on barge in Seattle.jpgStudents on the Kenai Peninsula are riding in style thanks to new Apple Bus Company buses delivered via Alaska Marine Lines. "We moved 88 buses from Seattle last Spring," explains Matt Jolly, Alaska Marine Lines Central Account Manager.

Apple Bus Company is a pupil transportation provider based in Missouri. Apple's 10-year contract with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is expected to save the school district around $1 million over the next decade compared to the previous contract with another vendor. The buses also feature improved heaters and safety signage.

The first batch of 10 buses were driven to Seattle and loaded at the Alaska Marine Lines Seattle terminal for the voyage to Whittier. School district drivers picked them up from there and drove to the bus barn in Soldotna. "We secured the buses on flats and put them up in the racks on the railbarge or loaded directly in the key if space was available," Matt explains.

Alaska Marine Lines also moved over 180 school buses the previous year for the Anchorage School District. "We are happy to support Alaska schools and students by moving the buses where they need to go," Matt says. "Wanema Arndt of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District even went to Whittier and watched our crew work one of the inbound barges."

Matt commended the operations crews in Seattle and Whittier for making exceptions for the bus deliveries. "Customers don't typically pick up freight in Whittier," he says. "We're not set up with customer service people there. It's a handful of operators and a mechanic essentially. It took a concerted effort to communicate between the Seattle terminal and Whittier pro numbers for each voyage so appropriate paperwork was on hand to properly deliver the buses. A big shout out to all of the operations people who made this happen."

Tags: Barge, Oversize shipping, Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska

Lynden legend Lee Burgess comes out of retirement

Posted on Sun, Sep 07, 2014

lee burgessLynden Legend Lee Burgess came out of retirement to help at NANA/Lynden Logistics at Red Dog Mine for a few weeks. Lee began his career with Lynden in 1957 and was one of the drivers of Old No. 27. “It was fun working with him and very enjoyable listening to the many old Lynden stories at the dinner table,” says Joe Purcell of Lynden Logistics. Lee also attended the SeaTac Summer BBQ in August. 

Tags: Lynden employees, Lynden History, Shipping to Alaska, Old 27

Drill rig move includes ice road delivery to Kuparuk

Posted on Thu, Mar 07, 2013

Long-time customer Nabors Drilling called on Lynden Transport earlier this year to move 72 loads for its rig “99” relocation project in the Kuparuk oil field. The move was a challenge with some loads weighing around 85,000 pounds and five that measured 14-feet wide.

“We started loading on Jan. 2 in Nikiski near Kenai and had 21 loads ready on the first day,” explains Justus Uphus, Lynden Transport Kenai Manager. “There was a delay on the receiving end when the drilling pad wasn’t ready, so Nabors decided to engineer and fit new wind-walls onto the lower part of the rig. We unloaded most of the loads that we had ready and had to start over two weeks later.”

Once the loads arrived at Prudhoe Bay, the second leg of the journey began. The ice pad destination was another three hours west of the Lynden office in Deadhorse, including an hour of driving over an ice road onto the Colville River Delta. The trucks, led by a pilot car, were in a convoy to the ice pad for the seven-hour roundtrip.

“Nabors Drilling was very impressed with how the move went from start to finish,” says Ryan Anderson, City Dispatcher at Prudhoe Bay. “The Kenai crew deserves a lot of credit. The most painstaking part of a rig move is the loading portion, and they did a great job. It made for a smooth delivery on our end. Our team at Prudhoe Bay also did a fantastic job getting the loads delivered in the specific order and time frame that the customer requested.”

Alaska West Express helped out by bringing up five heavy haul loads of generator units to power the rig, each weighing around 78,000 pounds. Justus singled out Kenai Operations Manager Justin Cooley and the Anchorage dispatch team for their expertise coordinating the movement of the rig out of Nikiski. “This project was another Lynden team effort resulting in a satisfied customer,” he says.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Logistics, Lynden Transport, Shipping to Alaska

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