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Lynden proudly supports government and military projects

Posted on Thu, Sep 13, 2018

Military move for Lynden TransportLynden companies have served the government and the Department of Defense (DOD) for decades by providing reliable transportation services, emergency aid, logistics planning and more via air, land and sea. "We offer one of the most logistically diverse transportation services in the world. From flying weekly missions to air bases in Germany and Japan, to mobilizing shipments for Operation Enduring Freedom and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) disaster response, we understand the unique challenges and deadlines of military and government projects," says Eric Wilson, Lynden Transport's Director of Pricing in Seattle. Lynden has a Government team to ensure military projects are efficiently planned and executed. Each member of the group has military clearance to view project websites and bid on jobs.

"Alaska Marine Lines is taking on more military moves in both Alaska and Hawaii, and Lynden Transport is serving the military on moves to, from and within Alaska installations," explains Jim Earl, Sales Manager at Alaska West Express. Lynden Transport is approved by both the U.S. and Canada as a DOD carrier, and recently handled 80 loads from Fairbanks, AK, to Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Wainwright, approximately 100 miles from Edmonton within a two-week deadline. Alaska Marine Lines is a Universal Services Contract (USC-8) approved carrier for the military's Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) and handles moves to and from Alaska and Hawaii. Alaska West Express continues to provide specialized hauling in both the Lower 48 and Alaska with dual drivers and satellite tracking for sensitive shipments.

Other Lynden companies have also provided support to government needs. Lynden International has been assisting government and non-government organizations with transportation and logistics in West Africa since the Ebola crisis in 2014. Lynden Air Cargo has conducted flights through Diplomat Freight Services (DFS), FEMA, the Red Cross and other supporting agencies and governments to bring in food, water, trucks, fuel and other disaster response supplies to ravaged areas.

To learn more about Lynden's military and government capabilities, please view our brochure at www.lynden.com/about/brochures/Government_Military.pdf or contact our team at information@lynden.com.

Tags: Lynden Capabilities, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Transport, Lynden International, Alaska West Express, Multi-modal shipping, Alaska Marine Lines

New ocean shipping options to Hawaii and Guam

Posted on Wed, Sep 05, 2018

Aloha BargeLynden International has served the Hawaiian Islands for more than 30 years and provided service to Guam for more than 20 years. For 2018, Lynden has enhanced its customer offerings in both locations by adding Less-than-Container-Load (LCL) ocean service between Los Angeles and Guam and LCL barge service between Seattle and Honolulu via Aloha Marine Lines.

"The new service provides a lower-cost alternative to traditional steamship line service," explains Charlie Ogle, Western Regional Sales Manager. "We offer twice monthly sailings to Oahu with connections to the neighboring islands." With this added service Lynden continues to offer our full menu of value-added capabilities like EZ Commerce, multimodal shipping options, Dynamic Routing, time-specific deliveries, and warehousing. To find out more about our services, please visit our website www.lynden.com/LINT or email lafmtg@lynden.com.

Tags: Lynden International, Alaska Marine Lines, Ocean Service, Barge

Ready for Bristol Bay salmon season

Posted on Mon, May 21, 2018

Loaded barge going from Dutch Harbor to NaknekAlaska Marine Trucking's Rick McKinley snapped this photo of the Alaska Trader leaving Dutch Harbor, AK last month on its way to Naknek. The fully loaded barge is carrying seven stacks of empty reefers—11 rows across and 5 high—for the Bristol Bay salmon season. "The containers will be filled with frozen salmon or salmon roe and carried back to Seattle or to Dutch Harbor for trans-loading onto a foreign ship for delivery to Asian markets," explains Greg Obeso, Alaska Marine Lines Account Manager.

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska Marine Trucking

Alaska Marine Lines brings new school buses to Kenai Peninsula

Posted on Fri, Jan 12, 2018

School Buses on barge in Seattle.jpgStudents on the Kenai Peninsula are riding in style thanks to new Apple Bus Company buses delivered via Alaska Marine Lines. "We moved 88 buses from Seattle last Spring," explains Matt Jolly, Alaska Marine Lines Central Account Manager.

Apple Bus Company is a pupil transportation provider based in Missouri. Apple's 10-year contract with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is expected to save the school district around $1 million over the next decade compared to the previous contract with another vendor. The buses also feature improved heaters and safety signage.

The first batch of 10 buses were driven to Seattle and loaded at the Alaska Marine Lines Seattle terminal for the voyage to Whittier. School district drivers picked them up from there and drove to the bus barn in Soldotna. "We secured the buses on flats and put them up in the racks on the railbarge or loaded directly in the key if space was available," Matt explains.

Alaska Marine Lines also moved over 180 school buses the previous year for the Anchorage School District. "We are happy to support Alaska schools and students by moving the buses where they need to go," Matt says. "Wanema Arndt of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District even went to Whittier and watched our crew work one of the inbound barges."

Matt commended the operations crews in Seattle and Whittier for making exceptions for the bus deliveries. "Customers don't typically pick up freight in Whittier," he says. "We're not set up with customer service people there. It's a handful of operators and a mechanic essentially. It took a concerted effort to communicate between the Seattle terminal and Whittier pro numbers for each voyage so appropriate paperwork was on hand to properly deliver the buses. A big shout out to all of the operations people who made this happen."

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Shipping to Alaska, Barge, Oversize shipping

Alaska Marine Lines named Philanthropic Business of the Year

Posted on Thu, Dec 28, 2017

Kevin Anderson AML award in Juneau.jpgAlaska Marine Lines was honored as a 2017 Philanthropic Business of the Year by the Juneau Community Foundation this fall. Alaska Marine Lines has donated shipping services and financial assistance to Juneau charities for many years. The award was presented to Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson at the annual awards dinner in recognition for transportation services donated to the Juneau Housing First Collaborative project in Lemon Creek. The project is a 32-unit apartment facility for some of Juneau's most vulnerable residents. The building is monitored by social services staff that support the residents with behavioral health services, medical services, food, laundry, and a small library/learning center. "Alaska Marine Lines is grateful to the community of Juneau and the JCF. We are proud to continue our long history of providing essential transportation services to the region, and we are humbled by the award and recognition," Kevin says.

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Awards, Community Service

Going Dutch

Posted on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

It's been a busy summer for Alaska Marine Lines' Dutch Harbor Service Center. The team recently handled the transport of a 60-ton rotor for Westward Seafoods, welcomed the 100th vessel of the season and moved into a new shop facility.

"Alaska Marine Lines moved the rotor from Seattle to Dutch Harbor to replace a failing unit in Westward's plant," says Tyler Riley, Dutch Harbor Service Center Manager. "We used two cranes to lift it off our barge which came in dockside to the Westward plant. The delivery went off without a hitch and we had one extremely happy customer."

AML rotor delivery to Dutch Harbor.jpgDutch Harbor serves as the hub for Western Alaska ports, transferring equipment and cargo as needed between Naknek, Dillingham, Bethel, Nome and Kotzebue. "We have many weeks where barges are back to back and we are working two vessels simultaneously," Tyler explains. "We move seafood daily from shoreside customer seafood plants Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods. On average we receive between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of fish oil and around eight loads of frozen fish daily from the plants during the busy parts of A and B seasons. We also have several fishing vessels that come to Dutch after catching and processing a full load of fish. They offload frozen product into our containers going to Seattle and backload packaging supplies for another trip to the fishing grounds."

In addition to the daily plant trucking and vessel offload activities, Dutch Harbor provides shuttle barge service for several outports. "During A season we service Saint Paul Island for the opilio (snow) crab season, Sand Point and Beaver Inlet for pollock. During B season we continue the shuttle barges to Sand Point and Beaver Inlet, and add service to Alitak, Chignik, and Port Moller for pollock and/or salmon," Tyler explains.

Last year, AML doubled its capacity in Dutch Harbor with a yard expansion of almost four acres and a second barge ramp system for cargo transfer operations. This year's improvements include a new shop and office built closer to the dock and yard. The mechanics now have a flat concrete floor to work on equipment under a roof out of the elements with a stronger connection between the office and the yard operations. The upgraded shop is constructed of 17 40-foot containers recycled from Alaska Marine Lines' Seattle yard. "They fit together like Lego pieces," explains Rob Jones, Assistant Service Center Manager. "John Maketa and Gordy Lindblad did the welding and built a tent roof for the shop. The containers, including some insulated reefers, were phased out of service so it was a great idea to use them to create our new facility."

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Oversize freight, Oversize shipping

Alaska Marine Lines donates transport of historic sailboat

Posted on Thu, Aug 24, 2017

 

Sailboat 1932 Double Ender moved by AML 3-17.jpg

Alaska Marine Lines stepped in to help the Bristol Bay Historical Society move a 1932 sailboat from Anchorage to Naknek for display in the Bristol Bay museum. The 26-foot by 9-foot fully restored wooden vessel was used for salmon fishing more than 80 years ago. It still has the bright orange streak identifying it as cannery boat. The Anchorage Museum did the restoration work on Koggiung #5. It was scheduled to go into permanent storage there when Fred Anderson of the Bristol Bay Historical Society heard about it and decided to bring it home to his museum. It will join an older wooden sailboat in a collection there with plans to create an entire display of historic wooden fishing vessels. It took about two years of negotiations and planning to move the boat, but with Alaska Marine Lines' donation of barge transport, it is now back in its native waters and ready for all to enjoy.

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Community Service

Lean & Green: Lynden facilities continue to save energy

Posted on Fri, Apr 28, 2017

Fife LTIA warehouse with lights - lean & green article.jpgThe annual Earth Day celebration is a good time to recognize Lynden employees who continue to do more with less, decreasing their energy use while improving safety and productivity. Since 2008, nearly 50 energy efficiency upgrades at Lynden facilities have led to the reduction of 2,350 megawatt hours of electricity and nearly 7 million British Thermal Units (BTUs) of heating fuel and natural gas per year.

According to Anna Deal of Lynden’s Green Initiative, that’s the equivalent of the average energy used in 167 homes or 335 passenger vehicles in one year! "Some of the most impressive reductions at Lynden have come from steady and consistent efforts and continuous improvement," she says.

For example, Lynden Transport’s Anchorage Service Center has reduced its heating fuel use by 20 percent over the last eight years by repairing insulation, sealing air gaps in the dock doors and dock plates with rubber, and installing new dock shelters. Most recently, a new direct digital controlled thermostat is reducing natural gas use even further. The Anchorage team invested in a series of lighting upgrades that has reduced electricity use by 20 percent, despite adding eight electric forklifts.

"One of the unexpected benefits of using electric lifts is the CO2 fan no longer kicks on in the cross-dock," says Richard Hennagin, Lynden Transport Safety Manager. "In a way, the lifts run for free because the fans are no longer pushing warm air outside or using electricity to run."

LTI, INC.
Similarly, the LTI, Inc. Service Center in Lynden, WA has reduced its overall electricity use by 37 percent since 2008. Employees have upgraded old lighting and HVAC systems, installed LED lights in the remodel, and most recently, yard lights were replaced with LEDs.

"One of the most exciting changes in the last few years is the number of Lynden facilities moving to LED lights," Anna says. "These lights give better quality light that mimics natural daylight while using a third of the energy. They last longer, so don’t need to be replaced as often. They are dimmable and turn on instantly, so they work well with smart sensor technology and there’s no mercury to dispose of when they do burn out."

More improvements throughout the companies:

ALASKA WEST EXPRESS
Alaska West Express in Fairbanks has some of the highest energy costs of any Lynden facility due to a lack of energy options, cold temperatures and the size of the 30-acre facility. Over the last few years the team replaced high wattage lights in the maintenance and tank-cleaning facilities as well as 76 yard lights with energy efficient LED lights. They reduced their electricity usage by 14 percent with a 2.5 year payback to recoup costs. "The best part is, the guys in the shop don’t have to wear their headlamps around anymore," says Gage Schutte, Alaska West Express Service Center Manager.

ALASKA MARINE LINES
Alaska Marine Lines began testing LED lights in the Seattle yard in 2015. "With a payback of less than three years and a 20-year lifespan, it seemed like a no-brainer," says Mark Gaska (now with Alaska West Express in Tacoma). Since then, M&R interior and exterior lights and salt tent lights have all been replaced with LEDs and smart sensors that adjust lighting output based on daylight levels and movement. Most recently, Alaska Marine Lines in Seattle became the first port facility in the world to use stadium style LED lights to light the yard.

"The truck entry lane in Yard 5 needed additional light for safety and security. Rather than disrupting operations and trenching power to install a new pole, we decided to use high mast LED lights. The difference is literally night and day. The safety crew and especially the night crew are very happy," says Tom Crescenzi, Alaska Marine Lines Service Center Manager.

LYNDEN TRANSPORT—Lower 48
Lynden Transport in Fife recently replaced lighting in the cross dock and yard (see photo on page 1). "The biggest benefit is safety," says Keith Johnson, Safety Supervisor. "After we moved to electric lifts, you couldn’t hear the lift approach over the buzzing sound of the old lights. The LED lights are quiet and the crew is able to read paperwork without going to the forklift for light." Lynden Transport Service Centers in Soldotna and Fairbanks also recently replaced their yard lights with LEDs.

"Even with all of the reductions at Lynden facilities to date, there is still a huge opportunity to reduce energy use further," Anna says.

Tags: Energy efficiency, Green Initiative, Green Lynden, LTI Inc., Lynden Transport, Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines

Alaska Marine Lines barge fills in for Turner Joy

Posted on Mon, Mar 06, 2017

Kuskokwim Trader barge as breakwater for Bremerton Marina.jpg

Alaska Marine Lines' Kuskokwim Trader filled in for the USS Turner Joy museum ship this winter serving as a temporary breakwater to protect the Bremerton Marina. The Turner Joy was scheduled for required maintenance in Seattle in January which left the marina without a breakwater to protect the small craft moored there.

Alaska Marine Lines Marine Maintenance Manager David Byrne first got the call from Steven Sparks at the Port of Bremerton. "He saw the Kuskokwim Trader anchored over at Sinclair Inlet near Gorst and came up with the idea to use it as a stand-in for the larger ship," he says. "At 300 feet long, the barge isn't as long as the 418-foot destroyer, so Western Towboat towed it to a spot further away from the bank where it would work just as well."

The barge did its job protecting the northern end of the marina from January through Feb. 28 when the Turner Joy returned to the harbor, towed by Western Towboat.

"When port staff called Alaska Marine Lines for help, David Byrne was very accommodating and acted quickly to help the Port and Historic Ships Association in resolving the issue by providing us with the Kuskokwim Trader.

Mike Clevenger and Rheagan Sparks helped with administrative tasks," says Jim Rothlin, Port of Bremerton CEO. "I very much appreciate Lynden's support."

The Kuskokwim will soon be towed to Western Alaska loaded with cargo for the annual fish season in Bristol Bay. "It was a great fit for the 35-year-old barge," David says, "and we were happy we could help out the Port of Bremerton."

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, Community Service, Barge

Alaska Marine Lines launches new barge to serve Southeast Alaska

Posted on Tue, Jul 19, 2016

Alaska Marine Lines celebrated the launch of its newest barge, Skagway Provider, at a ceremony July 7 at Gunderson Marine in Portland, Ore. where the vessel was constructed. The heavy deck cargo barge will make its maiden voyage from Seattle to Southeast Alaska July 29 and will begin serving Alaska Marine Lines customers on the Seattle to Southeast Alaska route.
Photo credit: www.facebook.com/gbrxcompanies

“We are proud to offer our customers additional capacity between Seattle and Southeast Alaska via the Skagway Provider,” says Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson. “It represents a significant investment in our Southeast Alaska service. Most Southeast communities have no land-route link with either the Lower 48 or the rest of Alaska. Virtually everything comes in by water – cars, heavy equipment, food and medical supplies – so providing reliable, efficient and safe equipment to serve our customers is extremely important to us.”

The Skagway Provider’s 360’ x 100’ x 22’ hull has capacity for 13,200 tons of cargo or about 800 20-foot containers. It is in the same class as Alaska Marine Lines’ barges Sitka Provider, Southeast Provider and Stikine Provider. Gunderson Marine has been a long and valued supplier, constructing 16 barges for Alaska Marine Lines over the past 18 years and continuing to invest in efficiency and new technology. 

Alaska Marine Lines offers twice weekly barge service to Southeast Alaska including Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, Haines, Skagway, Wrangell, as well as twice weekly service to Central Alaska, seasonal service to Western Alaska, and bi-weekly service to Hawaii. Charter services are also available. Current sailing schedules can be viewed online at www.lynden.com/aml/barge-schedule.html. Alaska Marine Lines is part of the Lynden family of companies.

 

Tags: Southeast Alaska, Alaska Marine Lines, Barge

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