Welcome to Lynden News!

Alaska Marine Lines launches new barge to serve Southeast Alaska

Posted on Tue, Jul 19, 2016

Alaska Marine Lines celebrated the launch of its newest barge, Skagway Provider, at a ceremony July 7 at Gunderson Marine in Portland, Ore. where the vessel was constructed. The heavy deck cargo barge will make its maiden voyage from Seattle to Southeast Alaska July 29 and will begin serving Alaska Marine Lines customers on the Seattle to Southeast Alaska route.
Photo credit: www.facebook.com/gbrxcompanies

“We are proud to offer our customers additional capacity between Seattle and Southeast Alaska via the Skagway Provider,” says Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson. “It represents a significant investment in our Southeast Alaska service. Most Southeast communities have no land-route link with either the Lower 48 or the rest of Alaska. Virtually everything comes in by water – cars, heavy equipment, food and medical supplies – so providing reliable, efficient and safe equipment to serve our customers is extremely important to us.”

The Skagway Provider’s 360’ x 100’ x 22’ hull has capacity for 13,200 tons of cargo or about 800 20-foot containers. It is in the same class as Alaska Marine Lines’ barges Sitka Provider, Southeast Provider and Stikine Provider. Gunderson Marine has been a long and valued supplier, constructing 16 barges for Alaska Marine Lines over the past 18 years and continuing to invest in efficiency and new technology. 

Alaska Marine Lines offers twice weekly barge service to Southeast Alaska including Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, Haines, Skagway, Wrangell, as well as twice weekly service to Central Alaska, seasonal service to Western Alaska, and bi-weekly service to Hawaii. Charter services are also available. Current sailing schedules can be viewed online at www.lynden.com/aml/barge-schedule.html. Alaska Marine Lines is part of the Lynden family of companies.

 

Tags: barge, barge service to Alaska, Alaska Marine Lines, Southeast Alaska

Lynden companies carry ceremonial totem pole to Hoonah, AK

Posted on Thu, Jun 16, 2016

Totem_Pole_with_three_carvers_in_Hoonah.jpgAlaska Marine Lines and LTI, Inc. donated the transportation of a ceremonial totem pole from Bellingham, WA to Hoonah, AK for a June 4 dedication in the Tlingit village. Carved by Scott Jensen, Jeff Skaflestad and Fred Fulmer at Jensen's Bellingham studio, the totem was requested by elders of the Chookaneidee Clan to replace an ancestral totem pole that, according to legend, served as a source of wisdom, protection and direction for the clan's shaman when the clan was located at Glacier Bay, AK.

The advance of the "Little Ice Age" between 1300-1870 drove the Tlingit out of Glacier Bay. The pole remained and was eventually enveloped in ice.  "After Glacier Bay was designated a national park, the clan was not allowed to return to their homeland," explains Master Carver Scott Jensen. "The clan relocated in Hoonah and, years later, the totem reappeared in the creek there.  Although the pole is now gone, the clan elders have wanted to replace it for generations."

Skaflestad relocated from Hoonah to Bellingham and Fulmer from Juneau to help Jensen carve the totem in his studio. After five months of work, the totem was finished and ready to begin its journey to Hoonah. Jensen called Lynden for help.

The Alaska Marine Lines team arrived at Jensen's Bellingham studio in May to pick up the 11-foot, 2,000-pound totem, which is considered both a clan and shaman pole. The crated totem pole was secured on a trailer for the ride to Lynden, WA where LTI, Inc.'s Tom Rainey used a forklift to carefully place it into a container for the ride to Seattle and transfer onto the barge for the journey to Southeast Alaska. In Petersburg, AK, the pole was transferred barge to barge for the final leg to Hoonah. "As a company serving Alaska for over 60 years, Lynden is proud to provide the transportation to bring this important ancestral piece back to Hoonah," says Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.Totem_Pole_in_shop.jpg

Although the elders who requested the new totem passed away before the dedication in June, the carvers say the ceremony was very moving. "We felt the presence of our ancestors," says Skaflestad who is part Tlingit. "There were many tears as we placed the totem pole in its ceremonial location in the creek. It was a proud moment of unification for all of us."  

"We feel very blessed to have Lynden's support in this project," Jensen says. "Each member of the Lynden team took great care in making sure the totem was safe and secure along its journey."

 

 

Tags: LTI Inc., Alaska Marine Lines, Southeast Alaska, Alaska, totem pole

Multi-modal project supports pipeline pump station

Posted on Fri, Jun 03, 2016

Alaska West Express and Alaska Marine Lines recently completed a nine-month multimodal move of pipe skids and other freight for an oil pipeline customer. Thirty loads originated at a manufacturer in Bellingham, WA and required marine and surface moves for final delivery to Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station #5 between Deadhorse and Valdez.  The pump station is an important relief station to slow the flow of oil as it descends from the Brooks Valley.

“This project began as a smaller move last summer and it continued to develop as the customer learned of our heavy haul and other capabilities,” says Steve Willford, Alaska West Express Project Manager in Fairbanks.

The project included three oversized loads which required transfer to a shuttle barge in Bellingham (see above) and on to the mainline barge in Seattle for eventual delivery to Whittier and Valdez. “They were odd-ball pieces, over-dimensional and overweight – not easy to move over the road,” Steve says.  Once they arrived in Valdez, Alaska West Express drivers Casey King, Andrew Wessels, Gary Ridall and Scott Vaughan (driving push truck) took over the delivery to the pump station. Jack Binder was the load supervisor for the Valdez shipments. Other loads arrived in Anchorage before the sailings stopped for the winter and were delivered by drivers Ken Seipel, Brian Ambrose and Del Shagen.  

Lynden is known for getting the job done and providing extra servicMod_C_Valdez_6.jpges when needed.  The final loads were delivered to the site when the installation contractor was on winter shutdown, so Alaska West Express arranged a jacking crew for unloading. Through careful coordination and planning, the arrival of the final loads was synchronized with the arrival of the jacking crew. “When we pulled away from the site, the loads were up off the ground where the customer wanted them. We were happy to provide literally everything they required,” says Jack.

Good weather helped the project stay on track as well as a new Scheuerle hydraulic highway trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year. The trailer is capable of carrying 100 tons and was put to work carrying the 84-ton back-pressure module between Valdez and the pump station. But the real key to the project’s success, according to Steve, was teamwork between Alaska West Express operations in Tacoma, Anchorage and Fairbanks and Alaska Marine Lines crews handling the barge moves in Seattle, Bellingham and Anchorage. “Our joint capabilities and smooth working relationships really came together to provide our customer with a seamless, door-to-door transportation package.”

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Trans-Alaska Pipeline

New marine safety system launched

Posted on Wed, May 25, 2016

Safety_Management_System_training.jpgExecutive management from Naknek Barge Lines, Bering Marine Corporation and Alaska Marine Lines met in Seattle earlier this year for the first training session to launch the joint Marine Safety Management System (SMS).  They were joined by Jim Maltby, Lynden Director of HSSE, and Rheagan Sparks, Lynden’s Marine Risk Manager.  Their objective: to educate participants about the internal audit processes within the SMS and to prepare them to conduct field audits aboard Lynden vessels during the 2016 operating season.

The first day of the training, led by Lynden Consultant Dione Lee of QSE Solutions, consisted of classroom learning and goal identification.  Participants took their newfound skills into the field on day two by conducting mock vessel audits aboard the Naknek tugboats Crosspoint and Polar Wind (see photo).  The group took turns in the roles of auditor and crew.

 Implementation of a formal Safety Management System is a growing trend in the maritime industry, according to Rheagan. “Since the acquisition of Northland Services in 2013, the three primary Lynden maritime companies have been working to consolidate their pre-existing procedures into a more coordinated format,” she says. “The SMS allows the companies to standardize and document their procedures.  This is part of a continually evolving process of improvement that reduces the likelihood of accidents and promotes a culture of safety.”  The new SMS system is endorsed by Lynden’s maritime liability insurer, Steamship Mutual P&I Club, positioning Lynden as an elite operator within the maritime industry.

 Captains from Naknek, Bering Marine and Western Towboat Company gave positive feedback about the January training.  “The SMS manual mostly reflects what we already do, but now it’s documented and accessible for everyone,” says Tim Kinkopf, Naknek General Manager. Future training sessions for vessel crews are scheduled later this year.

Tags: Bering Marine Corporation, Alaska Marine Lines, Safety, HSSE

New barge ramps in Ketchikan, Petersburg

Posted on Wed, May 18, 2016

After 30 years of service, Alaska Marine Lines’ Ketchikan barge ramp has moved to Petersburg. In its place is a new port cargo ramp constructed by Western Towboat. “We are excited to have a new ramp in Ketchikan and also happy to provide Petersburg with the first cargo ramp ever installed at that port,” says Southeast Alaska Marine Operations Manager Ricky Morgan. Removing the old ramp and installing the new one was a two-week process and included seven days of repairing and repainting the existing floatation tank system.New_barge_ramp_-_AML_Ketchikan.jpg

Both ramps are 120 feet long and 24 feet wide. The Ketchikan ramp operates by an onshore air supply system which supplies air to a flotation tank bolted to the ramp. The beach end pivots at the abutment connection. “The new ramp has a refined and stronger barge end transition design,” Ricky explains. “The old design put the ramp surface about 16 inches above the barge deck when the ramp was set in place on the barge. This required an additional wedge transition piece to be set in place to allow forklift access.” The new design has closed that gap to only 4 inches and it features a small transition plate, fixed to the end of the ramp by a hinge.

Petersburg’s ramp project was completed in April. The Petersburg crew is working on repairs and fabricating modifications to change it from a flotation support to an A-frame design. The ramp will also be sandblasted and painted.

According to Ricky, the Petersburg operation has been a “pass/pass” operation for many years. “With the cargo ramp installation, we have to reconfigure the dock face pilings and install a pedestal and electrical system for the A-frame.” A large concrete abutment must also be installed to anchor the ramp into the beach. “Having a fully operational cargo ramp in Petersburg should greatly increase productivity and operational efficiencies,” he says.

Ricky recognized the Ketchikan and Petersburg operations groups for their assistance with the project as well as Western Towboat for fabrication of the new ramp and A-frame. He also commended the Ocean Navigator Crew for their assistance with transporting both ramps to their new homes. “Special thanks to Gary Peterson, Rick McKinley, Rex Mansfield and Tom Sheehan, our expert team of crane operators, who executed safe precision while removing and installing the extremely heavy ramp system in Ketchikan,” he added. “And to Gordon Lindblad, who orchestrated every detail of this project, from start to finish, safely and efficiently.”

Tags: Alaska Marine Lines, barge service, Alaska, Ketchikan, Petersburg

Northland becomes 'Alaska Marine Lines' in Western Alaska

Posted on Fri, Dec 12, 2014

Alaska Marine Lines

Alaska Marine Lines, Inc. changed the name of its Western Alaska service from Northland Services to Alaska Marine Lines this month. The name change results from the integration of Northland Services into Alaska Marine Lines, one of the Lynden family of companies.

"Customers will continue to enjoy the same great service and people, but now under the Alaska Marine Lines name," says Alaska Marine Lines Vice President Bill Northey. "The team is the same, we're just changing our jerseys. As part of the Lynden family of companies, we have greater options to better serve customers' shipping needs."

Alaska Marine Lines' Western Alaska Dutch Harbor - Alaska Marine Linesservice from Anchorage and Seattle includes Bethel, Dutch Harbor, Naknek, Dillingham, Nome, Kotzebue and many smaller villages throughout the region. Northey added that the company commitment to cost-competitive price structures and sailing frequencies will remain the same. Alaska Marine Lines' 2015 sailing schedules are being distributed to customers this month.

Lynden's combined capabilities include: worldwide air and ocean forwarding, third-party logistics, trade show shipping, shipping to Alaska, scheduled barges to Alaska and Hawaii, charter and rail barges, intermodal bulk chemical hauls, scheduled and chartered Hercules L-382 cargo aircraft and multi-modal logistics, truckload and less-than-truckload freight to Alaska, customs brokerage and remote site construction. Lynden companies are repeat winners in the annual Quest for Quality awards presented by Logistics Management magazine.

Tags: Western Alaska, Alaska Marine Lines, barge service, Northland Services

Alaska Marine Lines invests in world's most efficient refrigerated units

Posted on Tue, Jan 14, 2014

AML logoAlaska Marine Lines, a Lynden company providing marine transportation to and from Alaska, is continuing its efforts to work lean and green by purchasing 200 of the most energy efficient refrigerated units in the world. The Star Cool "reefers" achieve the industry's lowest energy consumption by matching the compressor speed to the required heat load of the container rather than running at a single constant speed. In addition, the box and refrigeration equipment are built as one unit with an insulation system designed to minimize energy loss.

"At Lynden, we foster a culture of customer service, innovation and efficiency with a focus on protecting the environments where we do business," says Alex McKallor, Executive Vice President of Operations. "We operate under a company-wide Green Initiative and adopt programs and practices that reduce our environmental impact. Investing in this new energy efficient equipment is part of that effort."

Alaska Marine Lines barge into the sunsetAlaska Marine Lines already uses a time-share system on frozen loads, greatly reducing energy consumption, and the new Star Cool reefers will allow the same energy saving results for chill loads. The energy saved will make it possible to power more units during Alaska's peak fish season to accommodate high volumes for customers without additional generators, energy use and fuel costs.

Over the past two years, Alaska Marine Lines phased out its 220-volt reefers and transitioned to more energy efficient 440-volt units. The company has worked to reduce fuel use and conserve energy in other areas as well. Working with partner Western Towboat, fuel and route optimization has reduced fuel use without compromising service. At the Seattle terminal, lighting and heating upgrades have reduced electric and natural gas use, and new electric forklifts emit 50 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than the older propane units.

Alaska Marine Lines also works with local communities and other Lynden companies to support recycling efforts around Alaska. The company moves nearly 3,500 tons of recyclables each year from Anchorage to Seattle for Alaskans for Litter Prevention and Recycling (ALPAR), helping to make drop-off recycling free and convenient for residents. In Cordova, the company donates shipment of gill nets for the Copper River Watershed Project as well as aluminum cans and cardboard where proceeds from recycling go to the local high school.

Along with sister companies Lynden Transport and Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines has earned Alaska's Green Star Award, recognizing businesses that practice waste reduction, energy conservation, and pollution prevention. Lynden companies are on Inbound Logistics magazine's annual 75 Green Supply Chain Partner lists each year, and LTI, Inc., Lynden Transport, Brown Line, LLC and Alaska West Express are all EPA SmartWay Transport Partners.

Lynden's environmental policy calls for meeting or exceeding environmental regulations, maximizing fuel efficiency and monitoring and guarding against accidents, emissions and avoidable pollution.

Tags: energy efficiency, Alaska Marine Lines, green Lynden, environmental efforts, Green Initiative, Star Cool reefers

Northland joins the Lynden family of companies

Posted on Fri, Nov 01, 2013

Lynden Northland logos

The Lynden family of companies is pleased to welcome Northland Services, a marine transportation company providing shipping between Seattle, Alaska and Hawaii.

"Northland is a dynamic company with talented people and a great reputation," says Lynden President and CEO Jon Burdick. "Its barge capabilities to Hawaii and Western Alaska complement Lynden's current service offerings and allow us to provide expanded services to our customers. We can now offer integrated service to more Alaska destinations, with more frequency and greater combined capabilities."

Northland's barge service from the Pacific Northwest to Hawaii enhances Lynden's current ship and air services to the islands. The addition of Northland's Western Alaska barge services enables Lynden to service ports throughout the State of Alaska. Both companies share a commitment to keep customers' freight moving smoothly and efficiently through the transition process.

"Lynden provides an ideal situation to better serve our customers, our employees and the communities where we operate," explains Larry Stauffer, President and CEO of Northland. "We have seen significant growth in our business over the past decade, and bringing two great companies and teams together will help improve and expand service in the communities we serve."

"We are excited about the new opportunities that will emerge from the combination of Lynden and Northland," explains Executive Vice President and COO Alex McKallor.

The Lynden family of companies includes Lynden Transport, LTI, Inc., Milky Way, Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden Air Cargo, Brown Line, LLC, Lynden International and others. Its combined capabilities include: truckload and less-than-truckload freight to Alaska, scheduled and charter barges, rail barges, intermodal bulk chemical hauls, scheduled and chartered air freighters, domestic and international shipping via air and ocean forwarding, customs brokerage, trade show shipping, remote site construction, sanitary bulk commodities hauling, and multi-modal logistics. Lynden companies are repeat winners in the annual Quest for Quality customer service awards presented by Logistics Management magazine.

 

Tags: Northland, Western Alaska, Lynden, Alaska Marine Lines, barge service, Central Alaska, Southeast Alaska, Hawaii

Lynden Signs Purchase Agreement to Buy Northland Services

Posted on Tue, Apr 09, 2013

Lynden Signs Purchase Agreement to Buy Northland Services
Companies Agree on Sale Framework: Lengthy Process Remains Before Deal is Completed

Lynden (www.lynden.com), a family of freight transportation companies serving primarily Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, has entered into a purchase agreement to buy Northland Services, Inc. (www.northlandservices.com), a tug and barge carrier providing service between Seattle, Alaska and Hawaii.

"Lynden provides an ideal situation to better serve our customers, our employees and the communities where we operate," explained Larry Stauffer , President and CEO of Northland.  "We have seen significant growth in our business over the past decade, and bringing two great companies and teams together will help improve and expand service in the communities we serve."

Northland will be an independent operating company within the Lynden family of companies.  The current Northland management team would stay in place.  

Lynden's Alaska Marine Lines also provides tug and barge transportation services between Seattle and Southeast and Central Alaska.  "Northland has a great reputation, and adds Western Alaska and Hawaii to Lynden's service, enabling us to provide more service capabilities to our customers," said Lynden Chairman Jim Jansen.  "We are excited about the ability to provide integrated statewide Alaska service, higher service frequency, and greater combined capabilities for our customers. Where there is service overlap, we will organize to provide a higher level of service.  In certain communities where Alaska Marine Lines and Northland are the two primary freight carriers, other barge lines have plans to compete with us."

A lengthy, complex process remains before the purchase can be completed.  The proposed transaction is subject to regulatory review and other terms that, if completed, would likely result in closing in late 2013.

Northland's major shareholder, Endeavour Capital, is a Western U.S. private investment firm.  Endeavour's philosophy centers on the principle of stewardship: they believe in leaving a company in better condition than when they arrived.  Endeavour has partnered with Northland's shareholders and management team over the past nine years – together they have transformed Northland via significant investment in the business and helped it become a leader in marine transportation to the Alaska and Hawaiian markets.

For more information contact:

 

Lynden Media Contact

Northland Services Media Contact

David Rosenzweig

Kerri Hakoda

206-439-5527

206-892-2697

drosen@lynden.com

kerri@northlandservices.com

 

Tags: Lynden, Alaska Marine Lines, barge service, Northland Services

Alaska West Express Tests Extended Oil Changes

Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013

Alaska West Express truckAlaska West Express is testing an on-board oil filtration system on six of its tractors that is allowing the company to operate even more clean and green. The trucks can now run as many as 145,000 miles between oil changes, eliminating around 56 oil changes and saving 657 gallons of oil.

A six-micron filter removes debris from the oil and has a heating element to eliminate moisture. "The removal of moisture from the oil keeps the acidity of the oil in check and almost completely removes sludge," says Steve Nolan of Alaska West Express in Fairbanks. Rather than changing the oil every 25,000 miles, oil is tested and changed only when necessary which lowers maintenance costs.

Alaska Marine Lines has been using similar units to filter hydraulic fluid and oil on its equipment. "These units require a change in thinking from routine oil changes to sampling and changing based on actual need," says Les Candee, Equipment Maintenance and Procurement Manager at Alaska Marine Lines.  "It requires that sampling becomes part of the maintenance culture, as opposed to automatically draining and disposing of all fluids on a time-based program".

These maintenance programs are part of Lynden's ongoing commitment to environmental stewardship.

 

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, green Lynden, environmental efforts

Subscribe to Lynden News

Lynden on Facebook Lynden on Twitter Lynden on YouTube Lynden on LinkedIn

Browse by Tag