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Scheuerle trailer expands heavy haul capabilities

Posted on Wed, Jun 08, 2016

Scheurle_Trailer_with_Mod_E_in_transit_on_Dalton_Hwy.jpgLynden companies are known for providing customers with the latest, most versatile equipment and a hydraulic platform trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year is proving to be useful for a variety of projects in Alaska. Manufactured by German company Scheuerle, the trailer is built to handle long and heavy loads. According to Alaska West Express President Scott Hicks, the trailer carries the weight over instead of between the axles, requiring less steel to support the load and increasing payload.

The trailer was a keystone of Alaska West Express’ recent pipeline project in Alaska (see photo above) and has greatly increased heavy haul capabilities. “Besides the 100-ton payload, the manufacturer provides a program to determine estimated axle weights for permitting,” says Steve Willford, Project Manager. By inputting load data, the program calculates the projected load distribution on the axles. This data can then be submitted to DOT for overweight permits. The program has proven extremely accurate and saves valuable employee time as well as reducing liability.  

"The trailer hydraulic readings and the program have increased our capability to forecast and increases our confidence that we are exactly within limits for road and bridge crossings with our loads,” Scott says. Alaska West Express drivers and shop and maintenance employees participated in a three-day training program to learn the specialized features of the trailer once it arrived last year. The first load it carried was a survey boat 83 feet long and 23 feet wide from Prudhoe Bay to Anchorage.

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Multi-modal project supports pipeline pump station

Posted on Fri, Jun 03, 2016

Alaska West Express and Alaska Marine Lines recently completed a nine-month multimodal move of pipe skids and other freight for an oil pipeline customer. Thirty loads originated at a manufacturer in Bellingham, WA and required marine and surface moves for final delivery to Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station #5 between Deadhorse and Valdez.  The pump station is an important relief station to slow the flow of oil as it descends from the Brooks Valley.

“This project began as a smaller move last summer and it continued to develop as the customer learned of our heavy haul and other capabilities,” says Steve Willford, Alaska West Express Project Manager in Fairbanks.

The project included three oversized loads which required transfer to a shuttle barge in Bellingham (see above) and on to the mainline barge in Seattle for eventual delivery to Whittier and Valdez. “They were odd-ball pieces, over-dimensional and overweight – not easy to move over the road,” Steve says.  Once they arrived in Valdez, Alaska West Express drivers Casey King, Andrew Wessels, Gary Ridall and Scott Vaughan (driving push truck) took over the delivery to the pump station. Jack Binder was the load supervisor for the Valdez shipments. Other loads arrived in Anchorage before the sailings stopped for the winter and were delivered by drivers Ken Seipel, Brian Ambrose and Del Shagen.  

Lynden is known for getting the job done and providing extra servicMod_C_Valdez_6.jpges when needed.  The final loads were delivered to the site when the installation contractor was on winter shutdown, so Alaska West Express arranged a jacking crew for unloading. Through careful coordination and planning, the arrival of the final loads was synchronized with the arrival of the jacking crew. “When we pulled away from the site, the loads were up off the ground where the customer wanted them. We were happy to provide literally everything they required,” says Jack.

Good weather helped the project stay on track as well as a new Scheuerle hydraulic highway trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year. The trailer is capable of carrying 100 tons and was put to work carrying the 84-ton back-pressure module between Valdez and the pump station. But the real key to the project’s success, according to Steve, was teamwork between Alaska West Express operations in Tacoma, Anchorage and Fairbanks and Alaska Marine Lines crews handling the barge moves in Seattle, Bellingham and Anchorage. “Our joint capabilities and smooth working relationships really came together to provide our customer with a seamless, door-to-door transportation package.”

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Trans-Alaska Pipeline

Alaska West Express joins EPA's Smartway Transport Partnership

Posted on Tue, Sep 17, 2013

Logo SmartWay Transport ParAlaska West Express has joined the SmartWay Transport Partnership. SmartWay is a collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and transportation companies to voluntarily improve fuel efficiency and reduce air pollution from freight transport. Partners with high scores are already utilizing most of the commercially available fuel saving strategies and evaluating the latest emerging technologies. Sister company Lynden Transport became the first Alaska trucking company to join SmartWay in 2008. Lynden companies LTI, Inc., Milky Way and Brown Line joined in 2010.

"Alaska West Express has been focused on efficient operations for many years as part of Lynden's overall Green Initiative. We are extremely proud to be recognized by the EPA as a SmartWay Transport Partner," says Alaska West Express President Scott Hicks. "Although we operate in very tough and harsh conditions we remain committed and focused on energy efficiency and air quality. We also understand and appreciate that our customers share this same commitment. Alaska West Express will continue to strive for clean operations on the road and at all of our locations." The company is now included on the SmartWay Partner List where it joins other transportation providers who are moving the freight industry forward to a more sustainable future.

describe the imageAlaska West Express provides truckload transportation throughout the United States and Canada, specializing in heavy haul and bulk shipments to and from Alaska, where it is a leader in transporting liquid- and dry-bulk products, hazardous and non-hazardous chemicals and petroleum products. It is part of the Lynden family of companies, whose combined capabilities include: truckload and less-than-truckload freight to Alaska, scheduled and charter barges, rail barges, intermodal bulk chemical hauls, scheduled and chartered air freighters, domestic and international shipping via air and ocean forwarding, customs brokerage, trade show shipping, remote site construction, sanitary bulk commodities hauling, and multi-modal logistics. Lynden companies are repeat winners in the annual Quest for Quality customer service awards presented by Logistics Management magazine. 


Read more here: http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/09/13/5207017/alaska-west-express-joins-epas.html#storylink=cpy

Tags: Alaska West Express, green Lynden, SmartWay certification, environmental efforts

Alaska West Express donates transportation of bulldozer to university

Posted on Thu, Sep 12, 2013

Alaska west Express heavy haulA massive D-10 was seen rolling into Fairbanks this summer atop an Alaska West Express lowboy. The Fort Knox Mine donated the 115,000-pound bulldozer to the University of Alaska for use in its  diesel technician program, but the machine needed a lift from the mine to the university's diesel shop. Oversized loads are business as usual for Alaska West Express, so the company stepped in to help.

"Fort Knox has been hiring most employees from out of the state due to their experience with mining machinery," explains Brian Rencher, program director at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "They approached us about donating a large piece of equipment to the university to familiarize our students with it and better prepare them for mining jobs here in the Fairbanks area. The good folks at Alaska West Express donated the transportation and the crew did an excellent job. The pilot cars and truck driver Brian Maiorano were organized and planned traffic perfectly to get the truck and trailer into our parking area with the large machine."

The dozer was first delivered to the Carlson Center in Fairbanks for a Chamber of Commerce display and was then transported to the university's deisel shop. "We fully support the university and its programs and are glad to help whenever we can," said Scott Hicks, Alaska West Express president.   


Tags: Community Service, University of Alaska, Alaska West Express, oversize freight

Now that's a heavy haul!

Posted on Thu, Jun 20, 2013

Last fall Alaska West Express heavy haulAlaska West Express transported this boat (left, below) from Palmer to Anchorage. At 24 feet wide, 80 feet long and 17 feet tall, the cargo dwarfs the tractor. The kicker? The boat is not even as big as it gets. It’s missing its wheel house, which adds another 17 feet on top.

According to Steve Willford of Alaska West Express, the most challenging aspect of the project was moving the boat from the shop where it was built. “The shop outside of Palmer was not much bigger than the boat itself and was not one you could just casually drive away from, given the dimension of the boat,” he says. “With assistance from a winch truck and a short-yard tractor, the load was maneuvered safely to the main roadway. Ken Seipel was the driver and expertly demonstrated his dedication to getting the boat to its destination safely.”

Alaska West Express heavy haul

Photo credit: Sam Amato

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, oversize shipping, Alaska

Alaska West Express Tests Extended Oil Changes

Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013

Alaska West Express truckAlaska West Express is testing an on-board oil filtration system on six of its tractors that is allowing the company to operate even more clean and green. The trucks can now run as many as 145,000 miles between oil changes, eliminating around 56 oil changes and saving 657 gallons of oil.

A six-micron filter removes debris from the oil and has a heating element to eliminate moisture. "The removal of moisture from the oil keeps the acidity of the oil in check and almost completely removes sludge," says Steve Nolan of Alaska West Express in Fairbanks. Rather than changing the oil every 25,000 miles, oil is tested and changed only when necessary which lowers maintenance costs.

Alaska Marine Lines has been using similar units to filter hydraulic fluid and oil on its equipment. "These units require a change in thinking from routine oil changes to sampling and changing based on actual need," says Les Candee, Equipment Maintenance and Procurement Manager at Alaska Marine Lines.  "It requires that sampling becomes part of the maintenance culture, as opposed to automatically draining and disposing of all fluids on a time-based program".

These maintenance programs are part of Lynden's ongoing commitment to environmental stewardship.

 

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, green Lynden, environmental efforts

Alaska West Express delivers Steam Engine No. 557 to Wasilla

Posted on Thu, Oct 18, 2012

AWE hauls Steam Engine to Wasilla resized 600Alaska West Express was trusted with a very important – and heavy – load recently. Driver Kenny Seipel hauled a 150,000-pound steam engine from the Alaska Railroad yard in Anchorage to a Wasilla facility for restoration. Total weight of historic steam engine No. 557, the lowboy trailer and truck: 253,850 pounds. Special permits, pilot cars and trips to the scales were all part of the process. The trip was captured in pictures in the Anchorage Daily News. No. 557 was the last Steam Locomotive in the Alaska Railroad Fleet.  The locomotive was saved from the scrap yard by Monte Holm in Moses Lake, Washington. Monte made 557 the centerpiece of museum. After Monte’s death, Vic and Jim Jansen purchased No. 557 and donated it to the Alaska Railroad. After restoration, No. 557 will be used as a dinner train between Anchorage and Whittier.

Tags: Historic steam engine, Alaska West Express, Alaska

Last-minute military move completed without a hitch

Posted on Tue, Aug 07, 2012

Military moveLynden Transport recently moved 14 vehicles from Fort Richardson to Fort Greely, AK, on short notice to support the training and deployment of a bomb disposal unit to Afghanistan. “We were contacted two days before the move was to take place and because of the short timeline, weights and dimensions couldn’t be verified. We were also dealing with road restrictions,” explains Michael Forsythe, Account Manager at Lynden Transport in Anchorage. “We enlisted the aid of our sister company Alaska West Express for two of the loads.”

On load-out day, the Lynden team discovered the weights and dimensions did not include the attachments on the vehicles. “This presented major challenges with weight restrictions,” Michael says. “We scrambled to get the correct equipment on very short notice, and Alaska West Express ended up round-tripping the team they sent down from Fairbanks. If it wasn’t for the experience and professionalism of the team we assembled, I doubt this could’ve been pulled off.”

Bomb disposal unit military move

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Driver Brian Azmus with one of the loads.

Tags: shipping and project logistics, Alaska West Express, Lynden Transport, Alaska

Lynden drivers sweep awards at Alaska truck rodeo

Posted on Thu, Jul 19, 2012

Lynden drivers at the Alaska Trucking Association’s 13th Annual Truck Driving ChampionshipLynden Transport and Alaska West Express drivers took the top three spots in the Alaska Trucking Association’s 13th Annual Truck Driving Championship in Anchorage in May of this year.  Alaska West Express Driver Brian Ambrose earned first place overall followed by Steve Daugherty and Russ Cox of Lynden Transport. All three drivers are eligible to compete in the national competition in Minneapolis.

“We cleaned up,” says Richard Hennigan, Lynden Transport Health and Safety Supervisor. “We are proud of all 11 Lynden drivers who participated.” Drivers are required to complete an obstacle course, a written exam and perform a pre-trip inspection as part of the competition. In addition to taking the top three overall trophies, drivers placed in the following categories: Brian, first place, sleeper truck; Russ, first place, and Brian Aszmus (Lynden Transport) third place, 5-axle van; Steve, first place, 3-axle; and Jack Sorensen (Lynden Transport), second place, flatbed.

“I was on my game this year,” Brian says of his win. “I did better on the driving course than I ever have.” With 12 years of driving in Alaska and a previous trip to nationals in 2010, he says he knows what to expect in August. “It’s a huge step up from the state competition. I will be studying and practicing to prepare between now and then. I set a very high standard for myself.”

In addition to Brian’s first-place finish, one of the highlights of the day was Alaska West Express Driver Kenny Seipel winning the Old Geezer Award in Lynden’s original tractor-trailer Old No. 27.  “He strong-armed the old girl to 180 points which was amazing,” says Scott Hicks, Vice President of Operations at Alaska West Express. “We have phenomenal drivers. The Lynden companies definitely have bragging rights this year.” 

Pictured above (from left) with Old No. 27: Kenny Seipel, Jim Jansen, Brian Ambrose, Jack Sorensen, Russ Cox and Steve Daugherty

 

 


Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Trucking Association, Alaska Truck Driving Championships, Lynden Transport

Lynden companies and employees weather brutal winter storms

Posted on Tue, Apr 03, 2012

Historic storms hit Alaska and Washington this winter and Lynden companies pulled together to keep the freight moving and equipment operating in the harsh temperatures and record snows. Hardest hit is the Railbelt in Central Alaska while Whittier, Fairbanks, Anchorage and Kenai have had adverse weather for most of the winter.  Whittier has had 380 inches of snow this winter, and Valdez has received 403.9 inches of snow and is considered the snowiest locale in America. Cordova and Whittier are not far behind. Anchorage has had over 10 feet of snow this year. “With snowfall expected to be heavy in March*, we have a shot at the all-time record,” says Scott Hicks, Vice President of Operations for Alaska West Express.

Whittier Storm 2012
Conditions at the Alaska Railroad Corp. yard in Whittier, AK.

Compounding problems was a cycle of storms which hampered barge arrivals off and on since October. The Whittier terminal has been dealt further blows by storms which bring heavy snow, then melting conditions. The cold temperatures cause train wheels to freeze onto the tracks and make rail, truck and forklift operations very difficult. “We have experienced crippling conditions for rail and cargo operations,” Scott explains. Excessive ice buildup throughout the terminal shut down all rail movement in or out of Whittier for days. Avalanches caused train delays extending the time required for loading and unloading our barges, and tug crews have battled through storms, rough seas and lengthy voyages. 

snowy trains

“Our crew in Whittier has worked very hard to keep the freight, trains, trucks and barges moving,” Scott says. “They have worked almost every weekend since the first part of November. This includes our drivers shuttling and trucking loads on the weekends to take care of the priority freight for customers. Anchorage yard crews have also worked around the clock to unload trains and keep the trains and trucks moving. Fairbanks crews have battled temperatures as low as minus-60 degrees.”

snowy train

The Nana Provider has been cycled in as a fourth rail barge which has helped maintain weekly service.  “We have received help from multiple Lynden companies and I would like to thank them,” Scott says. “Our partners Western Towboat and the Alaska Railroad also deserve much credit for helping us ‘weather the storm.’” Lynden employees have done an outstanding job through this very difficult time with manpower and schedule changes. It truly is a team effort and a great example of what Lynden is capable of.”

In Washington, winter storms also brought freezing rain, heavy snow and extended road closures on Snoqualmie Pass due to avalanches. The governor declared a state of emergency and waived the hours of service limits for drivers hauling milk from farms to processing plants.

“Our Sunnyside and Moses Lake Milky Way drivers did an extraordinary job given the challenges they faced. They received help from the Portland, Chehalis, Skagit, Whatcom and Seattle services centers to deliver loads and keep our customers from having to dump milk,” says LTI, Inc. President Brad Williamson. Dispatchers met twice a day via teleconference and worked around the clock coordinating with the milk plants. It was an outstanding display of teamwork throughout the organization.”

As a side-note, LTI, Inc. delivered a record amount of road de-icer salt this winter to the Washington Department of Transportation and the City of Seattle. During January, LTI, Inc. trucks moved 30,771 tons of bulk salt from stockpiles at Seattle and Moses Lake to maintenance sites around the state.

* Note: This article was originally written in mid-March, 2012.

Tags: LTI Inc., Alaska West Express, Winter conditions, Alaska Railroad, Alaska shipping, Alaska, WSDOT

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