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Going Dutch

Posted on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

It's been a busy summer for Alaska Marine Lines' Dutch Harbor Service Center. The team recently handled the transport of a 60-ton rotor for Westward Seafoods, welcomed the 100th vessel of the season and moved into a new shop facility.

"Alaska Marine Lines moved the rotor from Seattle to Dutch Harbor to replace a failing unit in Westward's plant," says Tyler Riley, Dutch Harbor Service Center Manager. "We used two cranes to lift it off our barge which came in dockside to the Westward plant. The delivery went off without a hitch and we had one extremely happy customer."

AML rotor delivery to Dutch Harbor.jpgDutch Harbor serves as the hub for Western Alaska ports, transferring equipment and cargo as needed between Naknek, Dillingham, Bethel, Nome and Kotzebue. "We have many weeks where barges are back to back and we are working two vessels simultaneously," Tyler explains. "We move seafood daily from shoreside customer seafood plants Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods. On average we receive between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of fish oil and around eight loads of frozen fish daily from the plants during the busy parts of A and B seasons. We also have several fishing vessels that come to Dutch after catching and processing a full load of fish. They offload frozen product into our containers going to Seattle and backload packaging supplies for another trip to the fishing grounds."

In addition to the daily plant trucking and vessel offload activities, Dutch Harbor provides shuttle barge service for several outports. "During A season we service Saint Paul Island for the opilio (snow) crab season, Sand Point and Beaver Inlet for pollock. During B season we continue the shuttle barges to Sand Point and Beaver Inlet, and add service to Alitak, Chignik, and Port Moller for pollock and/or salmon," Tyler explains.

Last year, AML doubled its capacity in Dutch Harbor with a yard expansion of almost four acres and a second barge ramp system for cargo transfer operations. This year's improvements include a new shop and office built closer to the dock and yard. The mechanics now have a flat concrete floor to work on equipment under a roof out of the elements with a stronger connection between the office and the yard operations. The upgraded shop is constructed of 17 40-foot containers recycled from Alaska Marine Lines' Seattle yard. "They fit together like Lego pieces," explains Rob Jones, Assistant Service Center Manager. "John Maketa and Gordy Lindblad did the welding and built a tent roof for the shop. The containers, including some insulated reefers, were phased out of service so it was a great idea to use them to create our new facility."

Tags: Oversize shipping, Alaska Marine Lines, Oversize freight

Now that's a heavy haul!

Posted on Thu, Jun 20, 2013

Last fall Alaska West Express heavy haulAlaska West Express transported this boat (left, below) from Palmer to Anchorage. At 24 feet wide, 80 feet long and 17 feet tall, the cargo dwarfs the tractor. The kicker? The boat is not even as big as it gets. It’s missing its wheel house, which adds another 17 feet on top.

According to Steve Willford of Alaska West Express, the most challenging aspect of the project was moving the boat from the shop where it was built. “The shop outside of Palmer was not much bigger than the boat itself and was not one you could just casually drive away from, given the dimension of the boat,” he says. “With assistance from a winch truck and a short-yard tractor, the load was maneuvered safely to the main roadway. Ken Seipel was the driver and expertly demonstrated his dedication to getting the boat to its destination safely.”

Alaska West Express heavy haul

Photo credit: Sam Amato

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Alaska

Companies team up to move 70,000 lb bucket

Posted on Tue, Nov 02, 2010

You can imagine the planning and preparation it took to move this 12-foot wide, 11-foot tall bucket from the Lynden Transport yard in Fife to a gold mine in Fairbanks.

Oversize bucket - Lynden Transport
(From left: Lynden Transport employees John Thuney, Jered Nelson, Butch Brocato, Steve Flores and Doug McBride)

The 70,000-pound load required two AH52 heavy duty forklifts for the pick and placement on a trailer and a 4-axle tractor to pull it to TOTE in Tacoma for shipping to Alaska. Driver Tim Logsdon was escorted by a pilot car for the trip to the dock. In Anchorage, pilot cars and oversized permits were again needed along with an Alaska West Express 48-foot, 3-axle steel step deck trailer rated for 40-plus tons. “It took a real team effort to make this happen,” says Dane Anderson, Operations Manager in Fife.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska, Oversize freight

Trucking a 75,000 lb spool? All in a day's work.

Posted on Tue, Oct 12, 2010

This 75,000-pound tubing spool is headed north on the Dalton Highway via Alaska West Express. According to Project Specialist Steve Willford, this particular spool for customer Nabors Drilling was lighter than usual.

Nabors Drilling spool


The larger tubing spools are 15 feet in diameter and range in weight from 55,000 to 90,000 pounds, depending on the type of tubing. Alaska West Express has moved specialized coils, both on round spools and on more specialized work reels, with weights ranging from 100,000 to 120,000 pounds. The heavier spools are transported on lowboys with additional axles to distribute the weight.

 “We regularly haul tubing spools that come into our yard on rail cars. They are unloaded and stored for transport to the North Slope as needed,” he explains. “Our primary customer is Schlumberger, but we also have occasional spools that belong to Nabors Drilling.”

The smaller tubing spools measure 135 inches in diameter and weigh 40,000 to 45,000 pounds. “This is just another day’s work for most of our yard workers and drivers,” Steve says. “This is the type of service we provide our customers on an everyday basis.”

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Shipping in Alaska, Dalton Highway, Alaska, Oversize freight

Geothermal well project in King Salmon, Alaska

Posted on Tue, Apr 27, 2010

Three Lynden companies teamed up to support the development of geothermal energy in King Salmon, Alaska. Naknek Electric Association is drilling a 9,000 to 12,000 foot exploration well near King Salmon in hopes of harnassing power to supply 28 villages in Southwest Alaska. Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden International and Lynden Transport provided shipping and project logistics, often on short notice, to meet deadlines for assembling the drill rig and prepping it for drilling.

Geothermal well project

Lynden International handled the oversized shipping of a 15-foot, 4,000-pound replacement shaft for the drill rig from Houston to Anchorage. Lynden Transport took over in Anchorage, picking up the shaft and delivering it to a fabrication shop. Other overnight shipments for the project included two 2,600-pound motors for the drill rig picked up in Houston on a Saturday to have it in the customer's hands on a Monday morning.

If the wells are successful, the clean energy produced would replace 3.5 million gallons of diesel fuel now used to generate electricity in Naknek. This is a groundbreaking effort for Alaska and Lynden employees were proud to help get the project off the ground.

 

From the Lynden Archives: This story was originally written in November 2009.

Tags: Lynden International, Shipping and project logistics, Oversize shipping, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska, Oversize freight

Massive drill rig move to Russia requires Lynden teamwork

Posted on Thu, Apr 22, 2010

Quick, what's a mud tank?

If you're not sure, let us enlighten you. A mud tank is a piece of machinery used in a drill rig. As in drilling for oil. In Western Siberia.

EPCO Mud Tank
(EPCO Mud Tank)

Lynden International and Canadian Lynden Transport recently teamed up on an international drill rig move for Equipment Procurement Company Limited (EPCO) out of Calgary with a final destination of Siberia. The mobile drill rig consisted of 14 pieces and four containers of parts -- the most impressive being a 93,000-pound rig carrier and mast that required special permits and an 11-axle trailer truck combo to move it over the road.

EPCO Rig Carrier
(EPCO Rig Carrier)

The oversized loads and the proper documentation to move the freight in and out of three countries was challenging, but nothing too unusual for the Lynden team. The loads went from Calgary to the Port of Houston and were then loaded aboard a ship bound for St. Petersburg, Russia. Once there, they were transferred to rail for the final leg to the oilfields in Western Siberia.

Ship and Truck

Drill rig move - on ship

Truck on ship

Lynden is well represented in Russia and well versed in international project shipping. Lynden International operates as AmRusTrans with offices in Moscow and Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk.

 

From the Lynden Archives: This article was originally written in March 2010.

Tags: Lynden International, AmRusTrans, Russia, Oversize shipping, Oil Industry, Drilling Rig, Oversize freight, Canadian Lynden Transport, Lynden Archives

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