Welcome to Lynden News!

Going Dutch

Posted on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

It's been a busy summer for Alaska Marine Lines' Dutch Harbor Service Center. The team recently handled the transport of a 60-ton rotor for Westward Seafoods, welcomed the 100th vessel of the season and moved into a new shop facility.

"Alaska Marine Lines moved the rotor from Seattle to Dutch Harbor to replace a failing unit in Westward's plant," says Tyler Riley, Dutch Harbor Service Center Manager. "We used two cranes to lift it off our barge which came in dockside to the Westward plant. The delivery went off without a hitch and we had one extremely happy customer."

AML rotor delivery to Dutch Harbor.jpgDutch Harbor serves as the hub for Western Alaska ports, transferring equipment and cargo as needed between Naknek, Dillingham, Bethel, Nome and Kotzebue. "We have many weeks where barges are back to back and we are working two vessels simultaneously," Tyler explains. "We move seafood daily from shoreside customer seafood plants Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods. On average we receive between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of fish oil and around eight loads of frozen fish daily from the plants during the busy parts of A and B seasons. We also have several fishing vessels that come to Dutch after catching and processing a full load of fish. They offload frozen product into our containers going to Seattle and backload packaging supplies for another trip to the fishing grounds."

In addition to the daily plant trucking and vessel offload activities, Dutch Harbor provides shuttle barge service for several outports. "During A season we service Saint Paul Island for the opilio (snow) crab season, Sand Point and Beaver Inlet for pollock. During B season we continue the shuttle barges to Sand Point and Beaver Inlet, and add service to Alitak, Chignik, and Port Moller for pollock and/or salmon," Tyler explains.

Last year, AML doubled its capacity in Dutch Harbor with a yard expansion of almost four acres and a second barge ramp system for cargo transfer operations. This year's improvements include a new shop and office built closer to the dock and yard. The mechanics now have a flat concrete floor to work on equipment under a roof out of the elements with a stronger connection between the office and the yard operations. The upgraded shop is constructed of 17 40-foot containers recycled from Alaska Marine Lines' Seattle yard. "They fit together like Lego pieces," explains Rob Jones, Assistant Service Center Manager. "John Maketa and Gordy Lindblad did the welding and built a tent roof for the shop. The containers, including some insulated reefers, were phased out of service so it was a great idea to use them to create our new facility."

Tags: Oversize shipping, Alaska Marine Lines, Oversize freight

Alaska West Express donates transportation of bulldozer to university

Posted on Thu, Sep 12, 2013

Alaska west Express heavy haulA massive D-10 was seen rolling into Fairbanks this summer atop an Alaska West Express lowboy. The Fort Knox Mine donated the 115,000-pound bulldozer to the University of Alaska for use in its  diesel technician program, but the machine needed a lift from the mine to the university's diesel shop. Oversized loads are business as usual for Alaska West Express, so the company stepped in to help.

"Fort Knox has been hiring most employees from out of the state due to their experience with mining machinery," explains Brian Rencher, program director at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "They approached us about donating a large piece of equipment to the university to familiarize our students with it and better prepare them for mining jobs here in the Fairbanks area. The good folks at Alaska West Express donated the transportation and the crew did an excellent job. The pilot cars and truck driver Brian Maiorano were organized and planned traffic perfectly to get the truck and trailer into our parking area with the large machine."

The dozer was first delivered to the Carlson Center in Fairbanks for a Chamber of Commerce display and was then transported to the university's deisel shop. "We fully support the university and its programs and are glad to help whenever we can," said Scott Hicks, Alaska West Express president.   


Tags: Community Service, University of Alaska, Alaska West Express, Oversize freight

Giant windmill blades ride barge to Alaska

Posted on Thu, Aug 30, 2012

Giant windmill blades ride Alaska Marine Lines bargeThese windmill blades, measuring 148 feet long, recently rode Alaska Marine Lines’ railbarge Fairbanks Provider from Seattle to Whittier. The customer has also chartered the Nana Provider barge to move the remaining blades to a wind farm project in remote Healy, Alaska. The blades will be used in turbine towers at the Eva Creek Wind Project.

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Oversize freight

A weighty problem solved for Iowa customer

Posted on Thu, Jul 26, 2012

Oversized shipmentLynden International Business Development Manager Ken Davis is fond of telling customers “Never walk away from a project. There is always someone that can help.” That someone is usually Lynden.  Ken and Sheila Culwell at the Boston office and LaDonna Blackwell in Houston stepped in to help an Iowa manufacturer with an oversized international shipment.

"They had gone to other transportation companies and they just couldn’t produce the results,” Ken says.  The customer needed to move a huge mold to their plant in China from the Iowa facility. “With our experience moving oil equipment of odd sizes I knew we had the knowledge and contacts to get the job done,” Ken explains. “The crate was 132-feet-long and weighed 20,000 pounds. That meant a special flatbed trailer with permits and routes mapped out.  That is not something that you normally drive through a city!” Oversized trucking

Ken and LaDonna mapped out the route, picked up the shipment in Iowa and trucked it to the Port of Houston where it was loaded onto a breakbulk carrier into Taicang, China. The ship sailed in April and the mold arrived in Shanghai in May.

 

 

 

Tags: Lynden International, Shipping and project logistics, Oversize freight

No space? No problem. Lynden secures flight for urgent shipment

Posted on Wed, Apr 25, 2012

Lynden International Account Executive Nanci Ruese and International Manager Colleen Fort averted a crisis for a mining customer last year when a scheduled flight to move oversized magnetic separators from Birmingham, U.K. to Vancouver, B.C. stalled. The flight was overbooked and suddenly there was no space available to the shipper.

Nanci Ruese with oversized drums in Seattle warehouse(web) resized 600“Three huge drums needed to go to a manufacturing plant in Vancouver for customization and then on to the mine in Platinum, AK,” explains Colleen. “The mine was shut down waiting for these parts.” Nanci and Colleen “beat the bushes” to find another flight and the drums were soon on their way to Seattle. “Talk about heavy,” Nanci says of the 81,000-pound load, “even the forklifts were complaining!”   

From Seattle, the drums moved to B.C. via truck and on to the mine in Alaska after customization. “We actually feel our clients’ pain in these situations,” says Colleen. “Forwarders can step in and protect shippers’ interests, and we were happy to do so in this case.”

Photo: Lynden International Account Executive Nanci Ruese is dwarfed by the crate containing 81,000 pound magnetic separators bound for a mine in Alaska.

 

Tags: Lynden International, Air freight, Oversize freight

Smooth moves for Lynden International

Posted on Thu, Apr 05, 2012

Lynden International pulled together a last-minute charter move of oversized scanners for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) late last year. The scanners, weighing a total of 17,000 pounds, were needed at the Honolulu Airport immediately to replace malfunctioning machines used for scanning passenger luggage for explosives. 

“They were down to just one machine to scan passenger luggage for explosives at a very busy airport,” explains Juancarlos Cruz, District Manager at the Puerto Rico Over-sized scannersoffice. The Lynden team chartered a flight from San Juan to Los Angeles, handled all the rigging and packing, and set up another direct flight on a freighter into the Honolulu Airport. “It was a very complex move, but we knew it was a matter of public safety to get the machines to Honolulu as quickly as possible,” explains Juancarlos Cruz, Puerto Rico District Manager.  “Our team in San Juan with the help of Daniel Gotham in Houston and Roberta McClelland in Seattle pulled together to get it done”.

In another high-profile move, the Orlando and Newark offices handled the delivery of microphones and other audio equipment for use at the General Assembly of the United Nations Meeting at New York’s Warwick Hotel. Orlando Manager Danny LaVallee received a thank-you letter from customer ProLingo for Lynden’s outstanding service despite multiple last-minute schedule changes, Secret Service screenings and heavy security. “These events require time-sensitive deliveries, as well as good communication. All venues have heavy security and this meeting required several delivery time changes,” LaVallee explains. By keeping in contact between the Orlando and New Jersey offices, Lynden made all deliveries on time. “These deliveries were not easy, especially in a busy city like New York during UN week,” writes ProLingo Shipping Manager Julie Youmans. “Lynden made it seem effortless.”

Tags: Lynden International, Freight logistics, Oversize freight

Challenging Arctic Wolf drill rig move completed by Lynden

Posted on Thu, Jul 21, 2011

Canadian Lynden Transport and Lynden Transport handled a move from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to Edmonton, Alberta for customer Akita Drilling this spring. The Arctic Wolf drill rig consisted of 32 loads, including six weighing 90,000 to 110,000 pounds each. These challenging loads were coordinated by Prudhoe Bay Manager Jesse Burget and his crew and moved to Fairbanks. Tom Cox, Larry Johnson and Lonnie Young secured the loads in Fairbanks making them road ready for movement into Canada. Timing was important as seasonal road restrictions were about to go into effect that would delay the heaviest loads from transport to Edmonton.

Artic Wolf drill rig move

“The Prudhoe Bay, Fairbanks and Edmonton crews did a great job making it all happen,” says Lynden Transport Manager Mark Graves. The last and heaviest load of the entire rig made it to Edmonton one day before the restrictions were in place.

“We moved this rig north about four years ago for the customer,” says Canadian Lynden Transport President Walter Rakiewich, “so it was nice to get the repeat business.”

Artic drill rig move from Edmonton

From left, Tom Cox, Larry Johnson and Lonnie Young with the substructure for the Arctic Wolf drill rig in Fairbanks.

Tags: Oil Industry, Freight logistics, Oversize freight, Canadian Lynden Transport

Companies team up to move 70,000 lb bucket

Posted on Tue, Nov 02, 2010

You can imagine the planning and preparation it took to move this 12-foot wide, 11-foot tall bucket from the Lynden Transport yard in Fife to a gold mine in Fairbanks.

Oversize bucket - Lynden Transport
(From left: Lynden Transport employees John Thuney, Jered Nelson, Butch Brocato, Steve Flores and Doug McBride)

The 70,000-pound load required two AH52 heavy duty forklifts for the pick and placement on a trailer and a 4-axle tractor to pull it to TOTE in Tacoma for shipping to Alaska. Driver Tim Logsdon was escorted by a pilot car for the trip to the dock. In Anchorage, pilot cars and oversized permits were again needed along with an Alaska West Express 48-foot, 3-axle steel step deck trailer rated for 40-plus tons. “It took a real team effort to make this happen,” says Dane Anderson, Operations Manager in Fife.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska, Oversize freight

Trucking a 75,000 lb spool? All in a day's work.

Posted on Tue, Oct 12, 2010

This 75,000-pound tubing spool is headed north on the Dalton Highway via Alaska West Express. According to Project Specialist Steve Willford, this particular spool for customer Nabors Drilling was lighter than usual.

Nabors Drilling spool


The larger tubing spools are 15 feet in diameter and range in weight from 55,000 to 90,000 pounds, depending on the type of tubing. Alaska West Express has moved specialized coils, both on round spools and on more specialized work reels, with weights ranging from 100,000 to 120,000 pounds. The heavier spools are transported on lowboys with additional axles to distribute the weight.

 “We regularly haul tubing spools that come into our yard on rail cars. They are unloaded and stored for transport to the North Slope as needed,” he explains. “Our primary customer is Schlumberger, but we also have occasional spools that belong to Nabors Drilling.”

The smaller tubing spools measure 135 inches in diameter and weigh 40,000 to 45,000 pounds. “This is just another day’s work for most of our yard workers and drivers,” Steve says. “This is the type of service we provide our customers on an everyday basis.”

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Shipping in Alaska, Dalton Highway, Alaska, Oversize freight

Geothermal well project in King Salmon, Alaska

Posted on Tue, Apr 27, 2010

Three Lynden companies teamed up to support the development of geothermal energy in King Salmon, Alaska. Naknek Electric Association is drilling a 9,000 to 12,000 foot exploration well near King Salmon in hopes of harnassing power to supply 28 villages in Southwest Alaska. Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden International and Lynden Transport provided shipping and project logistics, often on short notice, to meet deadlines for assembling the drill rig and prepping it for drilling.

Geothermal well project

Lynden International handled the oversized shipping of a 15-foot, 4,000-pound replacement shaft for the drill rig from Houston to Anchorage. Lynden Transport took over in Anchorage, picking up the shaft and delivering it to a fabrication shop. Other overnight shipments for the project included two 2,600-pound motors for the drill rig picked up in Houston on a Saturday to have it in the customer's hands on a Monday morning.

If the wells are successful, the clean energy produced would replace 3.5 million gallons of diesel fuel now used to generate electricity in Naknek. This is a groundbreaking effort for Alaska and Lynden employees were proud to help get the project off the ground.

 

From the Lynden Archives: This story was originally written in November 2009.

Tags: Lynden International, Shipping and project logistics, Oversize shipping, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska, Oversize freight

Subscribe to Lynden News

Lynden on Facebook Lynden on Twitter Lynden on YouTube Lynden on LinkedIn

Latest Posts

Browse by Topic