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How “The Beast” moved from Alberta to the North Slope

Posted on Thu, Jul 23, 2020

Lynden hauling ERD rigRig 26, Doyon Drilling's new extended reach drilling (ERD) rig, completed its 2,400-mile journey from Nisku, Alberta to Alaska's North Slope this past winter. Lynden Transport, Alaska West Express and Lynden Oilfield Services teamed up to haul the 10.5-million-pound rig in pieces from Canada to Deadhorse where it was put back together after more than 320 separate truckloads arrived. Nicknamed "the beast," it is the largest land-based rig in North America and the first ERD rig ever built and moved in North America.

"This was one of the most high-profile projects Lynden has ever done and certainly the largest project that I have been involved in," says Paul Friese, Lynden Transport Vice President of Alaska Sales. "We started talking about this move four years ago, started planning a year ago and began the work in June 2019. In just six months we hauled over 320 loads. Our past work moving Rig 142 for Doyon set a high standard and gave them confidence in the Lynden team to handle this larger project. Many say the future of Alaska rides on the success of this new rig and technology, so we were under intense pressure and scrutiny to make sure the loads were delivered intact and on time for the reassembly in Deadhorse."

Rig 26 will have the capability to directional drill over 35,000 ft. (about 6.3 miles) from a single drilling pad on the North Slope. Doyon Drilling has been working for more than three years to build a larger powerful drilling rig, with increased capabilities greater than any other mobile land-based drilling rig on the continent. The new rig's extended reach can access production zones that were previously inaccessible with current drilling technology and capability.

"We want to thank the Lynden team," says Mike Lasher, Project Manager for Doyon Drilling in Anchorage. "Edmonton's Rick Stark oversaw every shipment loaded in Nisku, and Dan Rychlik helped with pre-planning and shipping requirements. Natasha Earl, Deanna Benson and Darren Stansbury and the Fairbanks team managed loads based on our priorities to ensure we received the right loads in the right sequence."

Rick also served as the Lynden project manager for Rig 142 and was instrumental in providing loading knowledge and experience along with James Delowsky. Rick and James loaded and moved most loads and transported them to the yard for staging and Cratex wrapping.

Doyon 26 Drill RigLynden's Prudhoe Bay crew received and coordinated loads in Deadhorse around the clock to get the rig pieces where they needed to go, and the Edmonton team stepped up their game for the project. "This move impacted everyone from the shop to operations to the front office," says Canadian Lynden Transport General Manager Dan Rychlik. "Employees like Kent Maltais worked weekends; others postponed vacations. We even had to pull people from Calgary to help cover at times. I am extremely proud of the team effort here."

Alaska West Express, led by Steve Willford, planned and supervised the most challenging loads. Alaska West Express drivers and employees handle oversize and overweight loads to and within Alaska for all Lynden companies, and they were essential in delivering the awkward heavy hauls. Roughly 75 percent of the loads hauled were for the rig's subbase which consists of 525 items weighing a total of 1.7 million pounds. The Excel spreadsheet the Lynden team used for the move is a color-coded map of detailed dimensions on handrails, columns, wheel assemblies, platforms and other parts. Mike and other members of Doyon's team were set up on EZ Commerce, Lynden's reporting and tracking system, to help manage the transportation phase of the project and keep track of Lynden loads between Canada and the North Slope.

According to Paul, the heaviest and most unusual loads were the draw works, mud pumps, main beams, and engines for the rig. "When you consider that we had to move more than 300 loads that distance in six months during the winter ice road months with DOT road work and pilot car driver shortages, it's pretty impressive," he says. "We did all this while maintaining our current customer base with no impact to them while we took on this huge project. That is a testament to our dedicated operations team, drivers and mangers. I don't think there is any other company in Alaska that could've pulled this off in such a short time frame. We truly have the best team in the industry and this project proves it."

Watch the video below for a bird's eye view of Rig 26. 

Tags: Alaska West Express, Oversize shipping, Lynden Transport, Oversize freight, Lynden Capabilities

Lynden Air Cargo carries massive equipment for mine

Posted on Mon, Mar 09, 2020

Victor Mine Trucks"This was some of the largest and heaviest equipment ever moved by Lynden Air Cargo," says Charter Manager Dave Beach. Lynden assisted DeBeers and Priestly Demolition, Inc. in their Victor Mine decommission and remediation project by flying oversized equipment out of Timmins, Ontario, to remote sites in Canada to ease the burden on the winter ice road.

"It was a team effort due to the size and complexity of the cargo. It required multiple trips to assist in the preparation and two of our most experienced Loadmasters, Leo Lopez and Matt Hise, on the job during the 16-day project," Dave explains. "The flight crew was exceptional, completing flights in difficult fall weather conditions in northern Canada. This equipment was some of the largest we have hauled in this quantity to date. Normally there are one or two pieces required to a location. This was several pieces over 17 flights, with very little margin for error due the sheer size and weight."

Lynden has worked with DeBeers out of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories since 2006, but this is the first project outside of that yearly work. "Both DeBeers and Priestly Demolition expressed their admiration at the professionalism of Lynden's crews and operations department. "We will likely see much more work with both of these groups in the years to come," Dave says.

Tags: Hercules, Shipping and project logistics, Lynden Air Cargo, Oversize freight, Lynden Capabilities

Big modules headed to Big Lake

Posted on Tue, Dec 17, 2019

Transporting Modules to Big Lake, AKThese oversized modules were just a few of the total picked up in Seward for transport to Big Lake, AK recently. "All loads required permits or pilot cars," explains Brandon Bovy, Lynden Transport Operations Supervisor. "We sent four drivers a day for two weeks to move them all."

Kenai Service Center Manager Andy Collins worked with the state on approving permits, and Operations Assistant Mike Gaiser was on site each day to walk through the process with the drivers. "I also rode down one of the days to oversee the project," Brandon says. "We had a very tight deadline and specific times we were required to be in Seward. We used step-deck trailers and step-deck stretch trailers to move the loads legally over the road. Everything went smoothly thanks to the expertise of our Drivers Mike Allman, Jack Sorensen, Tolo Mauga and Vic Capala."

Tags: Lynden Transport, Alaska, Oversize freight

A little to the left…

Posted on Mon, Sep 23, 2019

Alaska West Express transporting modulesThis oversized process module was on its way to an oilfield at Prudhoe Bay via Alaska West Express. The trip required crossing the Chatanika River Bridge on the Elliott Highway. "This is when our variety of equipment really pays off for our customers," explains John Binder, Alaska West Express Safety Specialist in Fairbanks. "The Scheuerle trailer allows us to raise and lower loads to clear just about any obstacle we might encounter." It was a smooth trip across the bridge and the mod arrived on time. Oversized loads like this require weeks and sometimes months of advance planning with the Alaska West Express team securing permits, insurance and additional personnel and pilot cars. "Dealing with unusual and heavy loads is our specialty," John says.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Oversize freight, Lynden Capabilities

Lynden International charters two Antonovs to Kingdom of Bahrain

Posted on Tue, Nov 27, 2018

Antonov charter to Bahrain 1280x628Lynden International chartered two Antonov aircraft to ship fragile tube bundles from Houston to the Kingdom of Bahrain, located just off the eastern coastline of Saudi Arabia in the Persian Gulf. Bahrain is a small archipelago of 33 islands and is seeing a resurgence in oil and gas activity.

According to Lynden International District Manager Diana Martinez, "We began working on this proposal a year ago." Lynden was selected for the job and began the complicated move by picking up eight tube bundles in Beasley, TX and bringing them to the Lynden warehouse for crating.

They were then moved to the airport for loading on the two chartered Antonov AN-124s. Each plane carried four tube bundles, each weighing 50,500 pounds and measuring 44 feet by 13 feet by 5 feet. Total aircraft weight: 202,000 pounds. "The tube bundles are used for heat exchangers and they are extremely fragile. The thin tubing on the inner structure is easily bent," Diana explains. With Lynden's careful handling, the bundles were delivered on time and in perfect condition. 

Tags: Lynden International, Oversize shipping, Oversize freight, Lynden Capabilities

Big load flies down the road

Posted on Wed, Nov 14, 2018

Parts of a vintage 727 jetliner were strapped to an Alaska West Express trailer at the Future of Flight Museum in Everett and hauled to a hangar at Columbia Pacific Aviation in Moses Lake, WA. The noteworthy move was covered by Seattle's KING–5 TV and Alaska West Express Driver Tom Lardie was featured on that night's newscast. The museum closed after 13 years and all the planes were taken down from the ceiling and hauled to new homes at other museums or moved into storage. "Dispatcher Roger VanMeter set this move up and knocked it out of the park," says Tacoma Service Center Manager Neil Cranford. "His planning and communication with the customer and driver insured that this freight moved without any damage or issues. It should also be noted that our driver, Tom Lardie, handled the move with the utmost professionalism. Having experienced drivers like Tom makes hauling oversize freight such as this possible." The fuselage was part of the original team plane for the Vancouver Canucks hockey team. According to Tom, it drew quite a bit of attention rolling down Interstate 90 from Western to Eastern Washington.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Trucking, Oversize freight

Going Dutch

Posted on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

It's been a busy summer for Alaska Marine Lines' Dutch Harbor Service Center. The team recently handled the transport of a 60-ton rotor for Westward Seafoods, welcomed the 100th vessel of the season and moved into a new shop facility.

"Alaska Marine Lines moved the rotor from Seattle to Dutch Harbor to replace a failing unit in Westward's plant," says Tyler Riley, Dutch Harbor Service Center Manager. "We used two cranes to lift it off our barge which came in dockside to the Westward plant. The delivery went off without a hitch and we had one extremely happy customer."

AML rotor delivery to Dutch Harbor.jpgDutch Harbor serves as the hub for Western Alaska ports, transferring equipment and cargo as needed between Naknek, Dillingham, Bethel, Nome and Kotzebue. "We have many weeks where barges are back to back and we are working two vessels simultaneously," Tyler explains. "We move seafood daily from shoreside customer seafood plants Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods. On average we receive between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of fish oil and around eight loads of frozen fish daily from the plants during the busy parts of A and B seasons. We also have several fishing vessels that come to Dutch after catching and processing a full load of fish. They offload frozen product into our containers going to Seattle and backload packaging supplies for another trip to the fishing grounds."

In addition to the daily plant trucking and vessel offload activities, Dutch Harbor provides shuttle barge service for several outports. "During A season we service Saint Paul Island for the opilio (snow) crab season, Sand Point and Beaver Inlet for pollock. During B season we continue the shuttle barges to Sand Point and Beaver Inlet, and add service to Alitak, Chignik, and Port Moller for pollock and/or salmon," Tyler explains.

Last year, AML doubled its capacity in Dutch Harbor with a yard expansion of almost four acres and a second barge ramp system for cargo transfer operations. This year's improvements include a new shop and office built closer to the dock and yard. The mechanics now have a flat concrete floor to work on equipment under a roof out of the elements with a stronger connection between the office and the yard operations. The upgraded shop is constructed of 17 40-foot containers recycled from Alaska Marine Lines' Seattle yard. "They fit together like Lego pieces," explains Rob Jones, Assistant Service Center Manager. "John Maketa and Gordy Lindblad did the welding and built a tent roof for the shop. The containers, including some insulated reefers, were phased out of service so it was a great idea to use them to create our new facility."

Tags: Oversize shipping, Alaska Marine Lines, Oversize freight

Alaska West Express donates transportation of bulldozer to university

Posted on Thu, Sep 12, 2013

Alaska west Express heavy haulA massive D-10 was seen rolling into Fairbanks this summer atop an Alaska West Express lowboy. The Fort Knox Mine donated the 115,000-pound bulldozer to the University of Alaska for use in its  diesel technician program, but the machine needed a lift from the mine to the university's diesel shop. Oversized loads are business as usual for Alaska West Express, so the company stepped in to help.

"Fort Knox has been hiring most employees from out of the state due to their experience with mining machinery," explains Brian Rencher, program director at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "They approached us about donating a large piece of equipment to the university to familiarize our students with it and better prepare them for mining jobs here in the Fairbanks area. The good folks at Alaska West Express donated the transportation and the crew did an excellent job. The pilot cars and truck driver Brian Maiorano were organized and planned traffic perfectly to get the truck and trailer into our parking area with the large machine."

The dozer was first delivered to the Carlson Center in Fairbanks for a Chamber of Commerce display and was then transported to the university's deisel shop. "We fully support the university and its programs and are glad to help whenever we can," said Scott Hicks, Alaska West Express president.   


Tags: Community Service, University of Alaska, Alaska West Express, Oversize freight

Oversized compressor goes land-sea-land to Ninilchik

Posted on Sat, Mar 16, 2013

AWE oversized loadDelays in super-load permits and customs paperwork created some nail-biting moments for Lynden employees who were charged with transporting a 120,000-pound load from Calgary to Anchorage and on to Ninilchik near Kenai. The compressor was not only heavy, its 30-foot by 14-foot by 12-foot high stature required special paperwork for a ship sailing and truck transport – and the customer needed it right away.

“We brought the compressor from Canada to Seattle to make a Friday ship sailing to Alaska. In addition, five support loads, including three oversized, had to be transported via truck and on site to beat the compressor delivery,” explains Jacob Harrison, Account Executive with Lynden Transport in Anchorage. 

Another challenge came with delayed customs paperwork. “By the time we received it, it was too late for Keith Hall at Lynden International to clear the shipment, so we were pushed back a day. Keep in mind, this unit needed to move as soon as possible to make the sailing cutoff time,” Jacob explains.

Lynden Transport Fife’s Neil Cranford was at the ship transfer site when the compressor arrived. When it was lifted via crane, one of the picking points began to bend under the stress of the weight. Neil found an alternative connection and the crane operator successfully transferred the unit to Lynden’s “Dakota” trailer which the Anchorage operations team had previously moved to Seattle.  

 “Drivers Ron Calkins and Anthony Brocato worked against the clock to make sure the unit was lashed correctly and moved to the ship safely,” Neil explains. “If not for their professionalism on site, this unit would not have made it through the stringent flatbed tying requirements.”

The compressor finally arrived in Anchorage and was transported to Ninilchik by Alaska West Express Driver Brian Ambrose. “Larry Kohlmaier, Cale Larson and Myles Hursley of Canadian Lynden Transport were key in the planning and execution of this move,” Jacob says. “With the contributions of Neil, Keith, Eric Wilson, Mark Graves and Justus Uphus of Lynden Transport, we made the customer’s deadline and secured future business.”

 

Tags: Lynden International, Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Logistics, Lynden Transport, Oversize freight

Giant windmill blades ride barge to Alaska

Posted on Thu, Aug 30, 2012

Giant windmill blades ride Alaska Marine Lines bargeThese windmill blades, measuring 148 feet long, recently rode Alaska Marine Lines’ railbarge Fairbanks Provider from Seattle to Whittier. The customer has also chartered the Nana Provider barge to move the remaining blades to a wind farm project in remote Healy, Alaska. The blades will be used in turbine towers at the Eva Creek Wind Project.

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: Barge, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Oversize freight

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