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Lynden employees keep the freight moving

Posted on Fri, Apr 24, 2020

Lynden employeeLynden employees are stepping forward to meet the needs of customers, keeping the freight moving as Lynden companies have always done during difficult times. Lynden has maintained regular business operations since the COVID-19 situation arose in late February with no disruption to global shipments or supply chains.

"The safety of our people and serving our customers are our priorities during these challenging times. We've been keeping freight moving to Alaska since 1954, and we're not planning to stop now," says Chairman Jim Jansen. "Lynden companies provide critical cargo services throughout Alaska and beyond and we are committed to delivering essential supplies and services to our customers and communities."

Lynden barges, trucks and planes deliver cargo to all points in Alaska including providing a supply lifeline to much of the state whose only surface supply line is Lynden and its dedicated people. "Our customers need our support to keep their businesses operating during this time and we are also supporting state and federal agencies. Keeping delivery routes open and supplies moving is our main focus and goal," explains Lynden President Jon Burdick. "We have dealt with earthquakes, oil spills, floods and other obstacles. This situation is no different."

According to Alaska Marine Trucking President Scott Hicks, employees are demonstrating the Lynden can-do attitude each day. "I have been so proud of our teams in Alaska," he says. "They are a shining example of the personal commitment required to keep businesses open and the economy moving. I know Lynden employees are doing the same in all locations."

Safety is one of Lynden's core values and many protocols have been implemented to ensure employees are operating in a safe and secure manner throughout all Lynden areas. Lynden's safety teams maintain active communication with local and federal agencies and comply with recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control.

"No transportation company in Alaska has a more essential and critical responsibility than we do," Jim says. "Without our service, many Alaskans would not have food and the other items essential to life. We can only meet their needs if our people are healthy, which is our No. 1 priority."

"As this situation unfolds, we are striving to offer a calm port in the storm by continuing to do our jobs as usual," Jon says. "Lynden has always responded in times of need and this is, unfortunately, one of those times. We are grateful for our dedicated employees who are dealing with additional challenges in their everyday work. They are the ones who allow us to serve our customers with minimal disruption."Lynden employee

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Lynden employees, Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Alaska, Shipping to Alaska

Honoring Lynden retirees

Posted on Thu, Jan 16, 2020

We would like to recognize the following Lynden employees who retired this past year. We are grateful for their service and contributions to Lynden, and we wish them well on their new adventures!

Steve McQueary – Brown Line, 40 years
Steve McQuearySteve (photo to the right) started working for Brown Line in 1979 with a short break in between to serve as an expert for U.S. Customs in the ACE Truck Manifest Program. In his 40-year career, he has been a driver, dock manager, dispatcher, general and sales manager. "As we are a small company, I also assisted in accounts payables, loaded trucks, received freight, handled insurance, cleaned the kitchen and did whatever needed to be done. I have also assisted other Lynden companies with FDA compliance," he says.

In the 1970s, truckloads of frozen salmon were packed in 100-pound boxes, halibut was shipped loose on the floor stacked like cord wood and full loads of King Crab sections were common. "I haven't seen a truckload of 100-pound salmon boxes shipped in years, it is now illegal to ship halibut on the floor, and the halibut quotas have decreased by 80 percent from what they were in the 70s," Steve says. "The value of King Crab makes it difficult for most buyers to buy a truckload."

Other changes Steve has seen in his career: freight ships on pallets and all trucks have a pallet jack. "In the 70s, everything we hauled was floor loaded and we used hand trucks. Paper log books were used for hours, drivers were more independent as there were no cell phones, and it was at their discretion to call in, much to the chagrin of the dispatchers. That world no longer exists with cell phones, satellite tracking, electronic logs and truck sensors."

Steve's most memorable project involved Trident Seafoods. "One of their overseas plants had run out of product and shut down," he recalls. "Sixty loads were sitting south of Seattle that needed to be shipped to Bellingham in a 3-day period. I had no clue on how we would cover it, but said that we would. Trident had turned around a vessel that was already at sea to return to Bellingham to pick this product up. We worked with other Lynden companies, using as many rigs as possible and saved Trident money by reducing the number of truckloads and delivering it all on time. This was a great "One Lynden" example. I took pride that Trident trusted me to get it done and that, at Lynden, nothing can stop us."

Retirement will bring home and woodworking projects, fishing, camping, golfing and touring the country with his wife in their Mustang convertible. "It's been a great career," Steve says. "I've made a lot of friends and enjoyed being a part of the Lynden family."

Cherri Webby – Lynden Transport, 32 years
Cherri WebbyCherri (photo to the right) started her career in 1987 as a Customer Service Representative in Ketchikan. "We worked for Arrowhead Transfer and were agents for Lynden Transport and Alaska Marine Lines. Lynden Transport used the highway to Prince Rupert, then the Alaska Marine Highway system to deliver freight in Southeast Alaska," she says. "Alaska Marine Lines had one weekly barge that serviced Southeast." In 2002, Cherri moved to Seattle and went to work for Alaska Marine Lines as a customer service representative, later becoming the manager of the department. Three years later, she went to work for Lynden Transport as Director of Customer Service.

"The biggest change I have seen in my career is the streamlining of our processes to move freight," she says. "From receiving the shipment, to moving the shipment from the dock to the trailer, to the customer, it has become much more efficient." Cherri's retirement plans include travel and family time.

Gary Schmahl – Lynden Air Cargo, 22 years
Gary SchmahlGary (photo to the right) began his career as an inspector with Lynden Air Cargo in 1997. He moved into Quality Control as a manager of scheduled maintenance and ended his career as a project manager. He has watched the company expand from two leased Electras to 10 L382 Hercules aircraft.

"My best memory is bringing six foreign aircraft onto the U.S. registry from 2005 to 2019," he says. "I have been the Quality Control Representative for over 130 B Checks and C Checks since 1999 in Singapore, the U.K., Canada and elsewhere." A B Check is a two-week maintenance and service check, and a C Check is a six-week heavy inspection and maintenance check," he says.

Gary's retirement plans include outdoor sports and traveling. He has a winter home in the Ozark Mountains for fishing and a home in Anchorage to enjoy the Alaska summers. "I would like to thank Lynden and all its good people and leadership for the past 22 years," he says. "There has been a lot of travel (1.5 million miles on Delta alone) and plenty of new experiences around the world. I had a lot of responsibility and all the tools to handle the tasks plus the appreciation for a job well done."

Paul Willing – Lynden Air Cargo, 20 years
Paul WillingPaul Willing (photo to the right) has been part of Lynden Air Cargo for almost 21 years, first as Director of Quality Control from 1999 to 2007 and then as Vice President of Maintenance from 2007 to 2019. In that time, he watched the company grow from an Alaskan operation to a worldwide company. "I really enjoyed the aircraft acquisitions over the years in Singapore, France and South Africa," Paul says, "and working with the dedicated and talented professionals at Lynden Air Cargo." His most memorable project was starting an airline in Papua New Guinea. Paul will start the new decade and his retirement with winter travel and spending more time sailing. "I would like to thank Lynden for the challenges and opportunities," he says.

Bob Weeks – Lynden Inc., 16 years
Bob has played an important part behind the scenes at Lynden for the past 16 years. Starting as a CPA in the Tax Department, he worked on corporate tax returns and conducted internal audits of operating companies for compliance and other issues.

The audits sometimes took months and Bob enjoyed getting to know each company's processes and talking to the people. "Alaska Marine Lines probably has the most assets in the most places of any Lynden company. Keeping track of every piece of equipment is a challenge," he says. "At the end of one particular audit, they were able to locate every asset, down to one last container at the bottom of a stack during their busy fish season."

Looking back, Bob's biggest challenge was learning the foreign tax laws necessary for setting up Lynden's new companies in Papua New Guinea and Ghana, Africa.

Retirement will bring motorhome trips with his wife, Rena, to Arizona and national parks in Utah. "I will enjoy not waking up at 5:01 a.m. every morning," he says, "but Lynden was a great company to work for."

Oksana Begej – Alaska Marine Lines, 38 years
Fish Queen. That is one of the titles Alaska Marine Lines Human Resources Director Oksana Begej listed when asked for her career information. After 38 years, she is entitled to a little fun. Oksana started her career back in 1982 when multipage invoices were typed on electric typewriters. "We went through a lot of whiteout!" she says.

Starting as Office Manager in Seattle, she moved into customer service, dispatch and finally human resources. "My best memories are the fabulous people I have worked with," she says, "and my favorite project would be skeleton entry where we didn't have to dig through piles of bills of lading to see if a shipment was received. That was a total game changer for us and our customers at the time."

Now that she is retired, Oksana plans to enjoy more time with her husband. "Alaska Marine Lines and Lynden are amazing and have provided a wonderful career for me and benefits for my family."
Bob Weeks, Oksana Begej & Eric Linde
Pictured above retirees Bob Weeks, Oksana Begej and Eric Linde

Eric Linde – Alaska Marine Lines, 24 years
Eric Linde has worked in various areas at Alaska Marine Lines during his 24 years, mostly providing leadership and management of Service Centers or Maintenance and Repair (M&R).

One of his best career memories was the Ketchikan Bypass. "We had 100 custom 20-foot containers made that could carry 100K pounds of bulk cement and other bulk products. A new forklift design was required with a lifting capacity of more than 100,000 pounds. We built and assembled transfer system conveyors and bag houses along with a tipper system that assisted in the transfer of bulk cement products from the containers to trailers on the Ketchikan end. It was a BIG job," he remembers.

Eric also commented on the changes in containers over the years. "I watched containers get bigger and heavier – from standard gauge to 10' high and 102" wide with increased gross weights. We had to increase the forklift size and carrying capacity and ability to stack them higher. Then we had new barges built to carry the larger containers and handle the increase in freight volumes. It's been amazing to see and be part of Lynden's futuristic ideas that have become the norm here at Alaska Marine Lines," he says.

Selah, WA is where Eric and his wife have decided to spend their retirement years. Their home is on acreage with a shop for Eric to enjoy his hobby of restoring antique farm tractors and agriculture equipment. "I am an avid snow and water skier, so I hope to spend more time in those activities now. We also have plans to continue to travel and see our National Parks that we have not been to yet. It's been an amazing career at Alaska Marine Lines. Thank you for the opportunity to meet and work with so many great people. I feel blessed to have been a small part of it."

Bill Merk – Alaska Marine Trucking, 28 years
Bill MerkBill (photo to the right) has been a 'jack of all trades' serving as a warehouseman, driver, customer service representative, warehouse lead, barge and yard freight operator, and, most recently, Human Resources Coordinator and HSSE Manager for the Juneau office during a career at Arrowhead Transfer from 1991 to 1997 and Alaska Marine Trucking from 1997 to 2019.

"The biggest changes I have seen in almost three decades is the ongoing development of freight managing processes and the increase in opportunities for employees to grow within the Lynden family of companies," Bill says. "I am most proud of the success of Alaska Marine Trucking's continuing safety improvements."

Bill's retirement plans include spending time with family in Portland, OR and completing his second collection of poetry. He also plans to travel and rediscover the deserts and mountains of the American Southwest. "It has been a pleasure working for a company that takes such good care of its employees; I couldn't imagine working anywhere else," he says.

Paula Daggett and Lynden teamPaula Daggett - Alaska Marine Trucking, 28 years
Paula Daggett (photo to the right) retired from Alaska Marine Trucking in September after 28 years as a Customer Service Representative in Ketchikan. She is pictured with other members of the Lynden team at her retirement celebration. From left: Dan Kelly, Paula, Adam Anderson, Paul Haavig, Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson and Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.

Senior Aircraft Records Specialist Pat Logan and Director of Quality Control Jeff Pull also retired from Lynden Air Cargo in December with 18 and 17 years of service respectively.

Tags: Lynden, Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden employees, Lynden Transport, Brown Line

Juneau driver’s fast actions prevent damages and injury

Posted on Wed, Jun 19, 2019

Alaska Marine Trucking DriverThe quick response of new Alaska Marine Trucking Driver Andrew Lawson saved company equipment and prevented the loss of three new cars belonging to a customer. Alaska Marine Trucking delivers vehicles to an auto dealership in Juneau twice weekly, year-round, with a specialized car-hauling trailer. Andrew was on the road to the dealership when he heard a loud ‘BOOM!’ He saw flames in his rear view mirror, pulled over and saw the trailer was on fire. The brakes of the trailer overheated and the brake drum blew in a fiery explosion. This, in turn, caught the inside trailer tire on fire, destroying it.

Andrew grabbed the fire extinguisher from his truck and quickly put out the flames. After the incident, he inspected all the gear and freight involved, and called his dispatcher. Fortunately Andrew and the cargo being transported were unharmed. Dispatcher Carolyn Smith contacted the dealership, and Andrew was able to unload the cars safely to complete delivery to the customer. "Thanks to his quick thinking and actions, Andrew saved the customer's shipment and Alaska Marine Lines what might have been a total loss of our equipment. I would like to recognize him for using his safety training, quick thinking and fast actions to save a disaster from happening," Carolyn says.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden employees, Safety, Trucking, Shipping in Alaska, Drivers

Juneau deliveries support salmon hatchery and Alaska fishing community

Posted on Fri, Jun 01, 2018

JNU fish delivery tankerTom Greinier has been hauling fish for Juneau's salmon hatchery, Douglas Island Pink And Chum (DIPAC), for over 20 years. In fact, DIPAC has followed Tom during his trucking career even before he started working for Alaska Marine Trucking. "He's the reason we haul fish for them at all," says fellow Driver Brian Weokoluk. "They specifically ask for him year after year."

Not only have Tom's skills behind the wheel led to a long-lasting customer relationship, his commitment to working around DIPAC's schedule has fed Juneau's waters with predictable salmon spawn while supporting the fishing community.

Alaska Marine Trucking Driver Jim Cartmill is a member of the DIPAC Board of Directors. "Trucking live fish from one point to another is crucial in the hatchery's success," he says. "They're raised at Macaulay until they're about 3 inches long, and then hauled off to an ocean pen where they mature and are released into open water. DIPAC is a huge support to both our local and intra-state communities."

According to Brian, the reason DIPAC trusts only a select few to truck live fish is all in the gear shifting during transport. The drive must be as smooth as possible for the least amount of disruption to the fish. If the gear changing rocks the holding tanks too much during the drive, it can cause air bubbles in the tankers that may stress or even kill the small fish fry.

Fortunately, that's not a worry with professionals like Tom in the driver's seat. This spring he took some time to talk another of Alaska Marine Trucking's experienced drivers through the process for their first run to the Thane Road site with a DIPAC employee.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Lynden employees, Shipping in Alaska, Drivers

Ready for Bristol Bay salmon season

Posted on Mon, May 21, 2018

Loaded barge going from Dutch Harbor to NaknekAlaska Marine Trucking's Rick McKinley snapped this photo of the Alaska Trader leaving Dutch Harbor, AK last month on its way to Naknek. The fully loaded barge is carrying seven stacks of empty reefers—11 rows across and 5 high—for the Bristol Bay salmon season. "The containers will be filled with frozen salmon or salmon roe and carried back to Seattle or to Dutch Harbor for trans-loading onto a foreign ship for delivery to Asian markets," explains Greg Obeso, Alaska Marine Lines Account Manager.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines

Amphibious craft gets multi-modal ride all the way to Barrow

Posted on Thu, Jun 06, 2013

Fully assembledAlaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden Transport and Lynden Air Cargo all played a role in the multi-modal move of an amphibious unit from Southeast Alaska to Barrow. Working together, the Lynden team moved the prototype machine and its equipment from Ketchikan to Haines via ferry, Haines to Anchorage via truck and Anchorage to Barrow, the northernmost city in the U.S., via air.

Customer Service Representative Lisa Adams coordinated the booking and logistics with the support of Alaska Marine Trucking employees Kathleen Gamble, George Mitchell and Keith Nelson who handled tasks including loading the unit on a flat in Ketchikan. “Bill Gallaway scheduled loading and took measurements with me and Kathleen in Juneau gave pricing and made driving arrangements to get the unit to Anchorage,” Lisa says.

The machine is a prototype built by Randy Johnson and his son Tyler of Tyler Rental in Ketchikan. Organizations have expressed interest in using the unit for search and rescue and oil spill response among other things. “This move was extremely critical due to the requirements of our contract to demonstrate the unit to the U.S. Coast Guard in Barrow,” Randy explains. “We were very pleased with the support provided by the Lynden team". 

The logistical plan including loading the machine at the manufacturing facility in Ketchikan and transporting it to Alaska Marine Lines for loading onto a 40-foot flat. Transport out of Ketchikan was challenging. The amphibious craft was loaded onto a ferry. A Lynden driver met the ferry in Haines to haul the unusual machine on the next leg to Anchorage for loading on a Lynden Air Cargo Hercules. 

Once in Anchorage, the machine was transloaded again onto a special trailer that Lynden uses for loading the Hercules.  It was a tight fit inside the Herc as Lynden’s maximum height for cargo is 8 feet, 9 inches high and 9 feet wide inside the plane. The flat was slid into the plane on custom skids placed on each side. 

Tyler rode as a courier on the Herc. “Once we arrived in Barrow around midnight, we placed our craft on the tarmac and began assembly the day after,” he says.  After its journey north, the ‘Amphib’ was back in Anchorage for a few weeks where Tyler was offering demonstrations. 

Tags: Multi-modal shipping, Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Transport

Lynden companies team up for mining haul in Yukon, U.S. and Canada

Posted on Thu, Mar 29, 2012

Last year, four Lynden companies teamed up on a project to transport lead and zinc ore concentrate from the Yukon Territory to Washington and then deliver it to its final destination in Trail, B.C. Alaska Marine Lines, Canadian Lynden Transport, LTI, Inc. and Alaska Marine Trucking began transporting two-ton bags in November 2010 then, in March 2011, switched to specially designed ore containers.Transporting Ore Pots

Canadian Lynden Transport’s Whitehorse operation trucks the ore concentrate 400 miles from the Bellekeno Mine site in the Yukon Territory to Skagway, AK, where it is loaded onto Alaska Marine Lines barges by Alaska Marine Trucking. Once the barges reach Seattle, LTI Inc.’s Moses Lake operation picks up the huge ore pots and delivers them to a smelter in Trail, B.C. 

The ore is carried in 16-ton pots moved three at a time on a B-train chassis from the Yukon to Alaska at a total weight of 170,000 pounds. In Washington and British Columbia they are carried two at a time for a total weight of 105,000 pounds (see photo).

The new contract is keeping the LTI, Inc. Moses Lake crew busy. "This has been an interesting project for us,” says Regional Manager Vance Jansen. “It's a good example of the efficiencies that come from multiple Lynden companies working together." Lynden International also plays a role by filing customs entries.

Tags: Multi-modal shipping, LTI Inc., Alaska Marine Trucking, Alaska Marine Lines, Innovative transportation solutions, Canadian Lynden Transport

Alaska Marine Trucking first Green Star certified business in Juneau

Posted on Thu, Feb 23, 2012

Alaska Marine Trucking is Juneau's first Green Star Award business.  Employees worked hard to complete all 10 standards to achieve the Green Star Award, including adding the Green Star policy to the environmental policy statement in the employee handbook. Other efforts include replacing paper coffee cups with ceramic mugs, offering bio-friendly water bottles to reduce paper cup use, encouraging double-sided copying and improving fuel efficiency for vehicles through maximizing payloads and eliminating unnecessary weight. PeopleNet on-board computers monitor truck speed, shifting and idle time. Employees also participated in energy audits, implemented a company-recycling program, and removed lighting from vending machines to cut down on unnecessary energy use. “Alaska Marine Trucking has blazed a trail in Juneau for efficient and energy-wise business practices," says Christina Grande, Community Outreach & Communications Coordinator for Green Star in Anchorage.

Green Star Award   AMT Juneau(web) resized 600

From left: Green Star's Kim Kovol and Randy Virgin, Alaska Marine Trucking's Bill Merk and Lynden Inc.'s Anna Deal with the Green Star certificate at the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Energy efficiency, Recycling, Green Lynden, Green Star certificate, Environmental efforts, Alaska

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