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Ready for Bristol Bay salmon season

Posted on Mon, May 21, 2018

Loaded barge going from Dutch Harbor to NaknekAlaska Marine Trucking's Rick McKinley snapped this photo of the Alaska Trader leaving Dutch Harbor, AK last month on its way to Naknek. The fully loaded barge is carrying seven stacks of empty reefers—11 rows across and 5 high—for the Bristol Bay salmon season. "The containers will be filled with frozen salmon or salmon roe and carried back to Seattle or to Dutch Harbor for trans-loading onto a foreign ship for delivery to Asian markets," explains Greg Obeso, Alaska Marine Lines Account Manager.

Tags: Alaska Marine Trucking, Seafood, Alaska, Grocery Chill and Frozen, Temperature-Controlled, Ocean, AML

Alaska Marine Lines brings new school buses to Kenai Peninsula

Posted on Fri, Jan 12, 2018

School Buses on barge in Seattle.jpgStudents on the Kenai Peninsula are riding in style thanks to new Apple Bus Company buses delivered via Alaska Marine Lines. "We moved 88 buses from Seattle last Spring," explains Matt Jolly, Alaska Marine Lines Central Account Manager.

Apple Bus Company is a pupil transportation provider based in Missouri. Apple's 10-year contract with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is expected to save the school district around $1 million over the next decade compared to the previous contract with another vendor. The buses also feature improved heaters and safety signage.

The first batch of 10 buses were driven to Seattle and loaded at the Alaska Marine Lines Seattle terminal for the voyage to Whittier. School district drivers picked them up from there and drove to the bus barn in Soldotna. "We secured the buses on flats and put them up in the racks on the railbarge or loaded directly in the key if space was available," Matt explains.

Alaska Marine Lines also moved over 180 school buses the previous year for the Anchorage School District. "We are happy to support Alaska schools and students by moving the buses where they need to go," Matt says. "Wanema Arndt of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District even went to Whittier and watched our crew work one of the inbound barges."

Matt commended the operations crews in Seattle and Whittier for making exceptions for the bus deliveries. "Customers don't typically pick up freight in Whittier," he says. "We're not set up with customer service people there. It's a handful of operators and a mechanic essentially. It took a concerted effort to communicate between the Seattle terminal and Whittier pro numbers for each voyage so appropriate paperwork was on hand to properly deliver the buses. A big shout out to all of the operations people who made this happen."

Tags: Alaska, Oversized/Heavy Haul, Ocean, Community, AML

It Takes a Village

Posted on Thu, Sep 14, 2017

Lynden supports Ward Village construction and other projectsWave desk for Hospitality Freight.jpg

Lynden Logistics caught the wave—and made sure the wave caught the flight from London to Honolulu. A 30-foot-long custom desk designed to resemble undulating water, the 'wave' is one of countless items Lynden has shipped to Honolulu for the construction of Ward Village, a 60-acre master-planned community boasting 4,000 residences and more than a million feet of shops, restaurants and entertainment venues.


"We were contracted to provide furniture, fixtures and equipment for all the public space for Ward Village, including the penthouses and the pool area," explains Randy Gentz, President of Hospitality Freight Company (HFC) in Las Vegas. "The oversized desk for the lobby was a beast and one of the most difficult things we have ever asked Lynden to ship for us—in the dimensions, 30 feet by 8 feet, fragility and its value of $250,000." Designed in England and made of resin, the wave arrived in Honolulu in a special crate. Due to its size, it required a sky crane to set it in place and secure it into position. With Lynden's help, HFC this and other work for Ward Village by the deadline.

In addition to unique designer desks, Lynden ships flooring, appliances, furniture, bathroom fixtures and other freight to support the hotel industry. HFC is a freight company dedicated to providing its clients with the best possible freight rates and service on hotel furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E). The company has counted on Lynden to make good on its promises for 32 years. For Ward Village (pictured above), Lynden moved domestic freight to its Los Angeles warehouse where the team consolidated weekly air and ocean shipments to Hawaii as the construction schedule dictated. The pieces included unusual items like an oversized dining table that required removal of a window for crane placement inside an upper floor unit.

Late last year, HFC also completed the 38-story Ritz-Carlton Residences in Honolulu and is currently at work supplying materials for the Wilshire Grand project, a 73-story, 900-room hotel on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles. When completed, it will be the tallest hotel west of the Mississippi.

Lynden has provided warehousing, shipping and deliveries for the project from the beginning and will continue until it is finished this summer. "I choose Lynden because they perform," Gentz says. "From providing quotes quickly to all the weird stuff that comes up with international air and ocean freight, they are always flexible and creative. Looking down the road, we may be working on a years-long monster project 20 times the size of Ward Village. Lynden was the first company I thought of to ship the variety of freight needed."

Two years ago during the West Coast labor dispute, Lynden's creativity came into play. HFC was facing delays at U.S. ports and needed to move FF&E from Vietnam to Chicago for a hotel grand opening. "By routing ocean shipments to Prince Rupert, B.C. then rail, the less-urgent cargo was on its way and we avoided U.S. ports," remembers Dave McGeath, Ocean Operations Manager in Seattle. Commercial flights and a chartered 747-400 freighter from Vietnam were used for the hottest shipments and overflow.

"Our goal is to create partnerships that make our customers successful and allow them to get those 'heads on beds' by hotel deadlines," explains Charlie Ogle, Lynden's Senior Director of Global Sales.

Hotel-condo conversions, hotel renovations and construction of new condominium hotels with mixed use space are sweeping the U.S. In some markets, like Miami, there has been a 15 percent reduction in hotel rooms as they are repurposed for condos.

Whether condos or hotels, the freight deadlines are non-negotiable. "These projects are high touch and high pressure," Ogle says. "They are notorious for running late due to late signoff of designs, funding and manufacturing delays. Materials orders are often placed when projects are already behind schedule. Customers look to the logistics provider to save the day. That's when our multi-modal mix of transportation comes into play."

Lynden's array of air, sea and surface choices allows customers to create customized domestic or international transportation plans to accommodate a mix of slower moving freight as well as expedited cargo. "We often move furniture from the manufacturer's factory overseas all the way through to delivery at the project site or project staging warehouse," Ogle says. In the event of time critical FF&E air transport or expedited domestic shipments, trucking can be arranged so that hotel equipment installation schedules are kept on schedule.

The ramifications of late or missing freight in the hospitality industry can be serious business. Hotel owners cannot afford to turn away confirmed guests due to a renovation project running behind. "Our job is to make sure the FF&E is there on time. Since we are the last cog in the procurement wheel it's up to us to proactively follow the customer's shipments and make adjustments mid-stream if necessary to meet installation deadlines," Ogle explains. "We design the solution around the needs and desires of our customers."

Tags: Hawaii, Lynden Logistics, Oversized/Heavy Haul, Multi-Modal, Ocean, International, Construction, 3PL

Going Dutch

Posted on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

It's been a busy summer for Alaska Marine Lines' Dutch Harbor Service Center. The team recently handled the transport of a 60-ton rotor for Westward Seafoods, welcomed the 100th vessel of the season and moved into a new shop facility.

"Alaska Marine Lines moved the rotor from Seattle to Dutch Harbor to replace a failing unit in Westward's plant," says Tyler Riley, Dutch Harbor Service Center Manager. "We used two cranes to lift it off our barge which came in dockside to the Westward plant. The delivery went off without a hitch and we had one extremely happy customer."

AML rotor delivery to Dutch Harbor.jpgDutch Harbor serves as the hub for Western Alaska ports, transferring equipment and cargo as needed between Naknek, Dillingham, Bethel, Nome and Kotzebue. "We have many weeks where barges are back to back and we are working two vessels simultaneously," Tyler explains. "We move seafood daily from shoreside customer seafood plants Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods. On average we receive between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of fish oil and around eight loads of frozen fish daily from the plants during the busy parts of A and B seasons. We also have several fishing vessels that come to Dutch after catching and processing a full load of fish. They offload frozen product into our containers going to Seattle and backload packaging supplies for another trip to the fishing grounds."

In addition to the daily plant trucking and vessel offload activities, Dutch Harbor provides shuttle barge service for several outports. "During A season we service Saint Paul Island for the opilio (snow) crab season, Sand Point and Beaver Inlet for pollock. During B season we continue the shuttle barges to Sand Point and Beaver Inlet, and add service to Alitak, Chignik, and Port Moller for pollock and/or salmon," Tyler explains.

Last year, AML doubled its capacity in Dutch Harbor with a yard expansion of almost four acres and a second barge ramp system for cargo transfer operations. This year's improvements include a new shop and office built closer to the dock and yard. The mechanics now have a flat concrete floor to work on equipment under a roof out of the elements with a stronger connection between the office and the yard operations. The upgraded shop is constructed of 17 40-foot containers recycled from Alaska Marine Lines' Seattle yard. "They fit together like Lego pieces," explains Rob Jones, Assistant Service Center Manager. "John Maketa and Gordy Lindblad did the welding and built a tent roof for the shop. The containers, including some insulated reefers, were phased out of service so it was a great idea to use them to create our new facility."

Tags: Seafood, Alaska, Oversized/Heavy Haul, Ocean, AML

Alaska Marine Lines barge fills in for Turner Joy

Posted on Mon, Mar 06, 2017

Kuskokwim Trader barge as breakwater for Bremerton Marina.jpg

Alaska Marine Lines' Kuskokwim Trader filled in for the USS Turner Joy museum ship this winter serving as a temporary breakwater to protect the Bremerton Marina. The Turner Joy was scheduled for required maintenance in Seattle in January which left the marina without a breakwater to protect the small craft moored there.

Alaska Marine Lines Marine Maintenance Manager David Byrne first got the call from Steven Sparks at the Port of Bremerton. "He saw the Kuskokwim Trader anchored over at Sinclair Inlet near Gorst and came up with the idea to use it as a stand-in for the larger ship," he says. "At 300 feet long, the barge isn't as long as the 418-foot destroyer, so Western Towboat towed it to a spot further away from the bank where it would work just as well."

The barge did its job protecting the northern end of the marina from January through Feb. 28 when the Turner Joy returned to the harbor, towed by Western Towboat.

"When port staff called Alaska Marine Lines for help, David Byrne was very accommodating and acted quickly to help the Port and Historic Ships Association in resolving the issue by providing us with the Kuskokwim Trader.

Mike Clevenger and Rheagan Sparks helped with administrative tasks," says Jim Rothlin, Port of Bremerton CEO. "I very much appreciate Lynden's support."

The Kuskokwim will soon be towed to Western Alaska loaded with cargo for the annual fish season in Bristol Bay. "It was a great fit for the 35-year-old barge," David says, "and we were happy we could help out the Port of Bremerton."

Tags: Ocean, Community, AML

Bird makes unexpected voyage on Aloha Marine Lines

Posted on Wed, Jul 27, 2016

Update: the albatross is finishing up rehab in California and hopefully will be heading home soon!

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IAlbatross_5-18-16.jpgn April a freeloading albatross hitched a ride on an Aloha Marine Lines voyage from Honolulu to Seattle. However, it nearly traded its life for what it saved in physical exertion.

Operations Manager Mark Sheehan first saw the bird when the night crew pointed it out to him after a two-week voyage across the Pacific Ocean. The bird was severely dehydrated and emaciated. Even in its weakened state, it wasn’t too keen on being assisted by a human, so when Sheehan tried to pick the bird up, it bolted.

Luckily, the bird was so weakened that it allowed Sheehan to pick it up (above). “That was fortuitous,” Mark said. “Had it been able to outrun me or was able to fly, it probably would have ended up dead.”

Mark_Sheehan_with_Albatross.jpgMark called the Seattle Aquarium and Veterinarian Lesanna Lahner who brought the female bird to the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center in Arlington where it was treated with antibiotics for pneumonia.

It’s likely that the albatross took a break on the barge when it departed Honolulu, then couldn’t get into a spot with enough wind necessary for it to take flight. So it settled in between a couple of containers for the grueling journey.

The albatross has been well cared for at Sarvey and is now ready to return home to Hawaii. Sarvey Wildlife Director Suzanne West is searching for a Coast Guard or commercial flight to get the albatross back to Hawaii for mating season.

Tags: Lynden, Hawaii, Ocean, AML

Alaska Marine Lines launches new barge to serve Southeast Alaska

Posted on Tue, Jul 19, 2016

Alaska Marine Lines celebrated the launch of its newest barge, Skagway Provider, at a ceremony July 7 at Gunderson Marine in Portland, Ore. where the vessel was constructed. The heavy deck cargo barge will make its maiden voyage from Seattle to Southeast Alaska July 29 and will begin serving Alaska Marine Lines customers on the Seattle to Southeast Alaska route.
Photo credit: www.facebook.com/gbrxcompanies

“We are proud to offer our customers additional capacity between Seattle and Southeast Alaska via the Skagway Provider,” says Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson. “It represents a significant investment in our Southeast Alaska service. Most Southeast communities have no land-route link with either the Lower 48 or the rest of Alaska. Virtually everything comes in by water – cars, heavy equipment, food and medical supplies – so providing reliable, efficient and safe equipment to serve our customers is extremely important to us.”

The Skagway Provider’s 360’ x 100’ x 22’ hull has capacity for 13,200 tons of cargo or about 800 20-foot containers. It is in the same class as Alaska Marine Lines’ barges Sitka Provider, Southeast Provider and Stikine Provider. Gunderson Marine has been a long and valued supplier, constructing 16 barges for Alaska Marine Lines over the past 18 years and continuing to invest in efficiency and new technology. 

Alaska Marine Lines offers twice weekly barge service to Southeast Alaska including Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, Haines, Skagway, Wrangell, as well as twice weekly service to Central Alaska, seasonal service to Western Alaska, and bi-weekly service to Hawaii. Charter services are also available. Current sailing schedules can be viewed online at www.lynden.com/aml/barge-schedule.html. Alaska Marine Lines is part of the Lynden family of companies.

 

Tags: Alaska, Ocean, AML

New world to Alaska ocean service

Posted on Fri, Jul 08, 2016

World_to_Alaska_graphic_-_Summer_2016_WINGS.jpgThrough its worldwide network of international partners and sister companies serving Alaska, Lynden Logistics introduced a new service this spring offering seamless Less-than-Cargo-Load (LCL) and Full-Container-Load (FCL) transportation to Alaska from foreign ports around the world. Whether it’s a pallet of fishing gear from China or a full container load of machinery made in Germany, Lynden can handle it all the way from origin to delivery in the 49th state.

“This product is unlike anything we have offered before and unique in the industry,” says Charlie Ogle, Lynden’s Senior Director of Global Sales. Working with its contracted ocean carriers and Shipco Transport, Lynden now provides port-to-door through ocean rates from more than 50 major ocean ports around the world to Alaska.

FCL customers save money, time and potential cargo damage by eliminating the transfer of cargo from one container to another in Seattle. LCL customers enjoy a single factor “all in” rate from the origin warehouse to door delivery in Alaska. Lynden can also handle all import requirements with U.S. Customs through its customs brokerage department in Anchorage.

“In this buy everywhere-sell everywhere world, Lynden’s new ocean product literally brings the world to Alaska customers,” Ogle explains.

Tags: Alaska, Lynden Logistics, Ocean, International

Lynden companies carry ceremonial totem pole to Hoonah, AK

Posted on Thu, Jun 16, 2016

Totem_Pole_with_three_carvers_in_Hoonah.jpgAlaska Marine Lines and LTI, Inc. donated the transportation of a ceremonial totem pole from Bellingham, WA to Hoonah, AK for a June 4 dedication in the Tlingit village. Carved by Scott Jensen, Jeff Skaflestad and Fred Fulmer at Jensen's Bellingham studio, the totem was requested by elders of the Chookaneidee Clan to replace an ancestral totem pole that, according to legend, served as a source of wisdom, protection and direction for the clan's shaman when the clan was located at Glacier Bay, AK.

The advance of the "Little Ice Age" between 1300-1870 drove the Tlingit out of Glacier Bay. The pole remained and was eventually enveloped in ice.  "After Glacier Bay was designated a national park, the clan was not allowed to return to their homeland," explains Master Carver Scott Jensen. "The clan relocated in Hoonah and, years later, the totem reappeared in the creek there.  Although the pole is now gone, the clan elders have wanted to replace it for generations."

Skaflestad relocated from Hoonah to Bellingham and Fulmer from Juneau to help Jensen carve the totem in his studio. After five months of work, the totem was finished and ready to begin its journey to Hoonah. Jensen called Lynden for help.

The Alaska Marine Lines team arrived at Jensen's Bellingham studio in May to pick up the 11-foot, 2,000-pound totem, which is considered both a clan and shaman pole. The crated totem pole was secured on a trailer for the ride to Lynden, WA where LTI, Inc.'s Tom Rainey used a forklift to carefully place it into a container for the ride to Seattle and transfer onto the barge for the journey to Southeast Alaska. In Petersburg, AK, the pole was transferred barge to barge for the final leg to Hoonah. "As a company serving Alaska for over 60 years, Lynden is proud to provide the transportation to bring this important ancestral piece back to Hoonah," says Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.Totem_Pole_in_shop.jpg

Although the elders who requested the new totem passed away before the dedication in June, the carvers say the ceremony was very moving. "We felt the presence of our ancestors," says Skaflestad who is part Tlingit. "There were many tears as we placed the totem pole in its ceremonial location in the creek. It was a proud moment of unification for all of us."  

"We feel very blessed to have Lynden's support in this project," Jensen says. "Each member of the Lynden team took great care in making sure the totem was safe and secure along its journey."

 

 

Tags: LTI Inc., Alaska, Ground, Multi-Modal, Ocean, Community, AML

Lynden Logistics sends classics across the pond

Posted on Wed, Jun 01, 2016

Gas tank drained. Check. Battery cables tied back. Check. Original Bill of Sale and shipper photo ID. Check.

After 18 years at Lynden Logistics and countless global shipments, International Agent Colleen Delaney knows what is needed to ship just about anything overseas. Automobiles have become her specialty over the past few years as she handles the safe ocean transport of vintage automobiles from the U.S. to the U.K. for London-based American Legends, LLC. “We don’t typically ship vehicles, due to the extensive paperwork and customs requirements, but we will handle this type of shipment for customers who approach us with these special requests,” she says. So far, Colleen has handled the transport of Corvettes, Mustangs, Ferraris, a 1965 Buick Riviera and she is preparing to ship over a Trans-Am from the Smokey and the Bandit film and a replica of the General Lee, a 1969 Dodge Charger from the TV show The Dukes of Hazzard.

When it comes to loading and securing the valuable automobiles into containers Lynden turns to trusted partner SeaPac Transportation Services of Seattle. “We use SeaPac for all our ‘special needs and delicate handling’ FCL shipments,” Colleen says. President Paul Kimball was Lynden Transport’s Vice President of Administration in the 1970s and understands the Lynden brand of customer service and excellence. In addition to cars, engines and other specialty parts are palletized and shipped via ocean for the company. “SeaPac is the best of the beColleen__Jack_best_pic.jpgst in this area. We won’t partner with just any company – we require top notch service to keep our customers happy,” Colleen explains.

The export of vehicles requires an extensive amount of paperwork. The original title and Bill of Sale is required by customs to prevent stolen freight. Customs filing must also be presented 72 hours prior to the sailing of the vessel so that the vehicle is available for inspection by customs if they so choose. “Lynden Logistics offers this premium service at reasonable prices compared to other forwarders,” Colleen says.

Most of the classics that Lynden ships for American Legends are headed to auctions in London or are sold to car collectors throughout Europe.

Tags: Lynden, Freight Forwarding, Lynden Transport, Lynden Logistics, Ocean, International