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Everyday Hero Profile: Ned Arthur

Posted on Thu, Jan 20, 2022

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies.

Introducing Ned Arthur, Equipment Operator at Knik Construction in Alaska.

EDH Ned Arthur

Name:
Neil (Ned) Arthur

Company: Knik Construction

Title: Equipment Operator

On the Job Since: 1989

Superpower: Paving Pro

Hometown: Searsboro, Iowa

Favorite Movie: Roadhouse

Bucket List Destination: Italy

For Fun: Halibut fishing on his boat, smoking meat, and spending time with his 12 grandchildren

How and when did you start working for Lynden?
I worked at Harley's Trucking and Polar Paving, which later became Roadbuilders, a big outfit in Anchorage, and Quality Asphalt before I was hired by Jim Kirsch at Knik. Jim was a great guy and we had a lot of fun. In 1989 when I was first hired, we were working in Skagway right on the ocean. We had a big dock down there and an ore terminal. Yukon Alaska Transport was a new company to truck lead and zinc ore from Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, to Skagway for loading on ships at the port. Knik bought its first asphalt plant and we paved around the terminal so it was easier to get the trucks in for ship loading. Jim, Lyle and Dale Kirsch were all people I worked with.

What is a typical day like for you?
If it's spring or summer I'm at work somewhere where Knik has projects going on. If it's winter I'm home. We work until it's so cold you can't work anymore or until snow makes paving too difficult. There have been times that I've had so many layers on that I can barely stand up!

Lately I've been working at the gravel pit. We have an asphalt plant set up there, and I run a loader when we're making asphalt. We usually make between 800 to 5,000 tons in a day and it comes out at 350 degrees. One day we had 35 belly dump trucks coming through from Anchorage and they went 80 miles to Homer.

I live in Sterling, AK in a log home we bought in 1986. A friend of mine sold it to me and what is now our living room was the original cabin. We put on a foundation, a loft and basement.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Working around heavy equipment you have to be alert. When loading and unloading barges you need to stay clear of booms and keep your eyes open. You can get hit if you don't know where you need to be. Also, in all the places we've traveled for projects, you never know what's coming. You have to adjust to different places, people and climates. Also, the climate can be tough. You're either cooking or freezing!

What are you most proud of in your career?
The Wake Island and Guantanamo projects. My wife Connie spent six seasons in Guantanamo Bay with me while we were working on that project. We were awarded the bid to do the runway, which was built on a big rock pile with cliffs all around it. It worked out well.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I grew up in Iowa, one of six kids in my family. I have an older brother and sister and two younger brothers and one younger sister. My dad was killed in a train accident when I was in sixth grade, so my mom had to raise us. We did everything we could to help my mom, and her parents helped too. My older brother moved to Alaska, so in 1977 I came up to check it out and never left.

I knew Connie from Iowa. She had two boys and worked at a restaurant that my mom managed in Grinnell. You could say my mom played matchmaker. We got married in Iowa then drove up the Alcan when her boys were about 9 and 10. We drove her Pontiac TransAm. We flew the boys up and they stayed with us in summers and went back down to Iowa for the school year. We had two daughters in Alaska, and now we have 12 grandchildren between all the kids.

What was your first job?
I worked at a filling station, pumping gas and changing oil when I was in high school. Once I graduated, I worked at a farm equipment manufacturing place for a couple of years. I was on an assembly line building pug mills that grind corn into animal feed.

What would surprise most people about you?
I took home a souvenir from a job site. I found a dead walrus on the beach near Platinum, AK. I decided to take it home to display the tusks in my house. I had to soak the skull to remove all the debris to get to the walrus teeth and tusks. My wife thought it was pretty strange, but I had the tusks mounted on a piece of walnut and it looks really good. One of the grandkids worshipped the walrus tusks.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I'm always on the go. I don't like to sit around. When I'm in Knik's off-season during the winter months, I watch some of the grandkids. They range from age 2 to 15. I also like to watch football – the Minnesota Vikings are my favorite team. I've always liked them from the time I lived in Iowa. I also like to cook BBQ meat on my Traeger smoker and take my 22-foot boat out fishing with buddies from work.

I also have a 38' by 28'-foot shop where I like to work on car restoration projects. I have a Ford Ranger XLT pickup that I bought new in 1976 and drove in Iowa. It only has 100,000 miles, and I don't take it out here unless it's dry weather. It's kind of a hobby. I've had Camaros, Chevelles and Novas. My first car was a 1955 Chevy Bel-Air, red with a white top, that I bought from my brother. I had it for about 10 years then bought a 68 Chevelle. I've had a lot of cars over the years.

What do you like best about your job?
It's nice to look at something you helped to build and know it will be there for a long time.

Tags: Lynden, Lynden Employees, Knik Construction, Everyday Heroes

Everyday Hero Profile: Rudy Dacumos

Posted on Tue, Dec 21, 2021

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Rudy Dacumos, Warehouse Lead at Lynden Logistics in Anchorage, Alaska.

Everyday Hero Rudy Dacumos

Name: Rudy Dacumos

Company: Lynden Logistics

Title: Warehouse Lead

On the Job Since: 1995

Superpower: Solving problems

Hometown: Tarlac, Philippines

Favorite Movie: Die Hard

Bucket List Destination: Tahiti

For Fun: Travel and spending time with family

How and when did you start working for Lynden?
An old boss at my previous employer transferred to Lynden, and he suggested I apply. He said it was a great company to work for. I've been at Lynden since September 1995.

What is a typical day like for you?
I assist with receiving shipments and loading and unloading the airplanes. As a lead, I am always motivating my team and keeping our spirits high. It is very important for me to make sure my team succeeds and enjoys being at work.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Sometimes it is challenging dealing with upset customers because it makes our job difficult. However, when we have happy customers and develop a strong relationship with them, it is probably the most rewarding part of the job.

What are you most proud of in your career?
When I started at Lynden, I was a Warehouse Representative and I worked my way up to becoming a Lead which took a lot of dedication and hard work.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I was born and raised in Tarlac, Philippines. I am the second youngest of five siblings. I have one brother and three sisters. My family came from the Philippines to Kodiak, AK in March 1980. I am very family oriented and I worked hard to make sure my sisters were able to attend college to become registered nurses. While I was in Kodiak, I met my late wife Jean and we have three wonderful children (one son and two daughters) and four amazing grandchildren.

What was your first job?
My first job was in Kodiak, AK at the cannery processing seafood.

What would surprise most people about you?
I love to bake and cook. My wife and I owned a bakery/restaurant in downtown Anchorage.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
Outside of work I enjoy playing with my daughter's puppy, Yoshi, fishing, cooking and traveling. I try to visit my son and his family in Salt Lake City and my daughter in Las Vegas as much as I can.

What do you like best about your job?
There are many things I like best about my job, it is hard to choose just one. I enjoy coming to work because of the team. Everyone is friendly and we work well together. I also enjoy meeting the customers and building a professional relationship with them. It is very important for me to gain customers' trust. Last but not least, Lynden is a great company to work for. Lynden offers great benefits and opportunities to grow with the company.

Tags: Lynden Employees, Lynden Logistics, Everyday Heroes

Employees retire with 200 years of combined service

Posted on Mon, Dec 20, 2021

Scott Polinder Retirement

Scott Polinder
Scott is one of Lynden's longest-tenured drivers. He started driving for Milky Way in 1974. "Scott continuously showed his reliability and commitment to safety throughout his driving career and achieved an amazing 43 years of safe driver awards," says LTI, Inc. President Jason Jansen. "He made a positive impact to our company over the years, and Lynden is honored to have had him on our driver team."

Brian Wood
Brian started with Lynden as a contractor in 1993. Two years later, he was hired as the Imaging Manager managing the ViewStar Software System in IT at Lynden, Inc. Brian has performed various tasks for Lynden over the past 20 years, filling in where needed. He says he looks forward to retirement and "reinventing himself into something completely different" as well as spending time with family.

John KaloperJohn Kaloper
"I was traveling through Anchorage on business one day in 1983, and I bumped into Bill Ferrari (then Vice President of Sales) in the hotel where we were both staying. We began a conversation, and I went to work for Lynden shortly after that in January 1984," John says. His first position was Account Executive in Seattle, then District Sales Manager and ongoing promotions culminating in his final role as President.

Looking back, John says his most memorable project was Lynden Logistics' involvement in the rebuilding of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in 1994. "We were awarded the contract to move 225 40-foot oversized modules via ocean freight from Houston to Moscow to serve as housing for the U.S. construction workers," he says.

There were multiple challenges with this project including the offload of a crane in St. Petersburg that crashed through the pier when the rigging broke. The crane was a total loss, and there wasn't time to ship a new one. A crane was rented locally at a significant increase in costs plus the expense of legal challenges resulting from the damage.

The second challenge was the result of a barge sinking in the waterway connecting St. Petersburg and Moscow which caused a two-week delay on delivery of the modules to the building site. "I had a number of sleepless nights dealing with the many calls needed to get these issues resolved," John remembers.

John says he is proud of the great relationships and long friendships forged with so many people in the organization. His plans for retirement include traveling to see his granddaughters in Michigan with his wife, Julie, and spending time on their boat. Fishing, golfing, skiing and house projects are on the agenda, too.

Dorene KolbDorene Kolb
Dorene leaves Lynden after 29 years with the satisfaction of helping to launch one of Lynden's most important programs: EZ Commerce. From meeting with customers to creating forms to adding features to create EZ Tracing and EZ Reporting, it took almost two years. "There were so many times I went to former Vice President Skip Hanson and said EZ Commerce was going to kill me, but I remained diligent and kept things moving," she says. Skip created the Bull Dog award and presented it to Dorene in recognition of her tireless work on the new program.

Dorene's Lynden career began in 1992 at Lynden Air Freight in Los Angeles as an Air Export Customer Service and Ocean Manager. She then moved to Seattle where she served in a variety of marketing positions, ending with Senior Marketing Project Manager for Lynden. In all those years, Dorene says she is most proud of the Driver Recruiting program she coordinated and the opportunity to mentor fellow employees.

"When I first came to Lynden's marketing team one of my areas of responsibilities included creating a Driver Recruiting program. I learned that it wasn't much different than working with sales. Although each Lynden operating company is responsible for their own hiring processes, they helped me learn the ropes and create a program that is valued and utilized," she says. "We now have a dedicated webpage, recruiting materials and analytics to monitor success."

Dorene has shaped many careers over her decades with Lynden. "My last few years have focused on mentoring people and providing support and feedback when requested. I've had some great people like Rich Wilroy, David Rosenzweig, Charlie Weaver, Skip Hanson, Alex McKallor and Ryan Dixon who mentored me. The best thing I could do was pay it forward."

After living in Edmonds, WA for 26 years, Dorene and her husband Carl have relocated to Lake Havasu, AZ and will be building a home there. "We planned a 21-day cruise for April sailing through the Panama Canal," she says. "We also plan to see the country in our motorhome, stopping whenever we like, staying as long as we like and moving on towards the next sunrise/sunset."

Jeanine St. JohnJeanine St. John
Jeanine retires as Vice President of Lynden Logistics, 27 years after she started her career managing Lynden's work with BP. "There have been so many exciting projects over the years, but the thing they all have in common is Lynden companies working as a team to achieve great results," Jeanine says. "Whether it was oil, mining, communications, defense or construction – each had challenges that the Lynden team was able to meet."

In 40 years working in Lynden's home state, Jeanine says she is most proud of the way the One Lynden team has coalesced in Alaska. "I love Alaska, both personally and professionally, and I've been very fortunate to work for a company full of people who have that same determination to make Alaska a great place to live and work."

Another part of Jeanine's career was working with industry, business groups, and community leaders to support Alaska's resource industries.* "Working on advocacy and campaign issues is always full of challenges, but when you win, it's a great feeling of accomplishment. I truly believe that the Lynden team will have great success continuing to move Alaska forward in developing its resources and infrastructure."

Jeanine will now enjoy unlimited time with her husband, Al, who also retired this fall. "We look forward to fun times with friends and family, including our five grandchildren," she says. "Fishing, hunting and quilting will move right up the priority ladder, as will working with a variety of nonprofits we support."

*This fall, Jeanine received the Chuck Becker Lifetime Achievement Award from the Alaska Support Industry Alliance, a nonprofit trade association that promotes responsible exploration, development and production of oil, gas and mineral resources to benefit all Alaskans. Jeanine is only the second recipient of the award which recognizes an individual who commits time and passion to the Alliance. She served as president and as a board member of the organization for more than 20 years.

Bob GehrkeBob Gehrke
After more than 32 years with Lynden, Bob Gehrke retires as Software Asset Manager at Lynden, Inc. in Seattle. Bob started his career with Lynden Air Freight in 1989 as a Property Control Specialist, later added Telecom and Facilities to his tasks, and was then hired as Purchasing Manager in 2006.

Bob says his most memorable project was the remodeling of floors 6, 7 and 8 at the SeaTac headquarters building. "It was a project that lasted almost two years from the planning stages to final construction. I was able to work with and meet many employees from different companies. The greatest challenges were the first Microsoft and the first Oracle audits. I lost some sleep and years of my life. I will not miss them!"

"During his tenure Bob was instrumental in many things and always kept us on track with purchasing and asset management," says Ken Kinloch, Director of IT Infrastructure and Security. "His knowledge and ability in this area will be missed." Bob plans to spend his days tending his coffee farm and relaxing on the beach at his home on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Tags: Lynden, LTI Inc., Lynden Employees, Lynden Logistics

Everyday Hero Profile: Brian Zweegman

Posted on Wed, Oct 20, 2021

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Brian Zweegman, Welder/Fitter at Lynden Tank Company in Lynden, Washington.
EDH post (1)
Name: Brian Zweegman

Company: Lynden Tank

Title: Welder/Fitter

On the Job Since: 1995

Superpower: Exceptional memory

Hometown: Lynden, WA

Favorite Movie: The Bourne Ultimatum

Bucket List Destination: Alaska and Holland

For Fun: Attending my kids’ sporting events and activities, RV camping, traveling and trap shooting

How and when did you start working for Lynden?
I started working at Lynden Tank in March of 1995 when I was 17 years old. The Mt. Baker Rotary Club had a job shadow program and Guy Jansen, who is a member of the Rotary, brought me to the tank shop as part of that program. I was given a job that same day. At one point, I drove for Milky Way for about a year, and I also drove for LTI, Inc. for about a year and did maintenance. I have done many projects through the tank shop for various other Lynden companies.

What is a typical day like for you?Brian Zweegman, EDH
On a typical day, I start work at 6 a.m. and work until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. No two days are exactly the same. Some days I am running a press brake, bending up components used for manufacturing milk tanks. Other days I could be inspecting a coded/chemical trailer or welding up components or doing a final inspection before a new set of milk tanks hits the road. There are some days that I do a bit of it all. My daily tasks depend on what is needed and what is a priority for the company.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Currently, our biggest challenge is navigating through material shortages and delays in getting the supplies that we need to build a quality product that meets our high standards. Personally, one of my challenges on the job is that I am color blind so I cannot do any wiring.

What are you most proud of in your career?
Every time we turn out a new set of trailers, I think we (all the tank shop employees) are proud of the work we put into them. When I am traveling in Washington or Idaho or beyond and I see a set of trailers I am proud that I had a small part in building them.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I grew up north of Lynden on a dairy farm that my parents still run today. My two brothers, my sister and myself all went to school locally, and we all still reside within 30 minutes of the family farm. Growing up, I was very active in the Lynden High School Future Farmers of America (FFA) and spent a lot of time working on Ag (Agriculture) mechanic projects in our school shop. I won various awards for these projects and also my tractor driving skills at both the state and national levels.
Today I still live in Lynden with my two kids. My son Case is a senior at Lynden High School and plays football and baseball. My daughter Maddie is a sophomore at Lynden Christian High School where she plays fastpitch and is involved in FFA.

What was your first job?
As a child of a dairy farmer, my very first job was on the family farm. When I was 11 years old I fed bull calves for a neighbor which was my first job off the family farm.

What would surprise most people about you?
I think a lot of people would be surprised to know that underneath my somewhat rough exterior I am a bit of a softie who wears my heart on my sleeve.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
When I’m not at Lynden Tank or watching my kids’ sports and activities I still work on my parents’ farm doing maintenance and crop harvest. When time allows, I like to take my travel trailer to new locations and explore new areas.

What do you like best about your job?
The first and most important thing that I like about working at Lynden Tank is my boss Len Kilmer. He is fair and honest, and he creates a great environment for us to work in. A very close second is the entire tank shop crew. They make coming to work fun, and I enjoy working with them all. I also like that no two days are ever the same which keeps things fresh. Very early on in my career with Lynden I had the opportunity to spend a lot of time with Mr. Hank Jansen. Those times produced great memories which I will never forget.

Tags: Lynden Tank Company, Lynden Employees, Everyday Heroes

A wish comes true in Wrangell

Posted on Tue, Sep 21, 2021

Arrowhead Transfer Port Manager Scott Curley heard about a surprise shipment of Cars-themed bedroom furniture arriving in Wrangell on the barge. He then discovered that the Make-A-Wish Foundation asked the local fire department to deliver the furniture to a local boy via fire truck.Blog crop (2)-2

Scott decided the fire truck delivery was a "bit bland" so he came up with a new plan. "Scott suggested that we decorate one of our tractors and a forklift to match the characters in the Cars movie and join the delivery by creating a parade," explains Charity Hommel, Customer Service Manager.

Jason Gadd suffers from a form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome. Jason's mother Dacee wrote to the foundation with a wish for furniture matching his favorite movie Cars. Scott, his wife Keeleigh, Dorthea Rooney, Charity, local drivers and Jason's uncles pulled the pallet of furniture when it arrived via barge, assembled it and loaded it on a flatbed for delivery the next day. The team then got to work decorating the vehicles as Guido and Mack.

"We spent our fourth of July in the warehouse working on this," Scott says. "We went through a lot of construction paper and tape!" On delivery day, the firetruck arrived at Jason's home and took him for a ride while volunteers assembled the furniture in his bedroom. "When Jason returned, the parade was ready with more than 50 Wrangell residents lining the streets all the way to Jason's front door," Scott says.

According to Dacee, she saw emotions in Jason that day that she hadn't seen in years. "I am just so thankful to everyone," she says.

Wrangell resident and Arrowhead customer Jim Debord wrote in to share what he witnessed that day. "Your people definitely went above and beyond to make that boy feel special. You have some really awesome people here representing your company."

Tags: Lynden Employees, LTL, Community, AML

Everyday Hero Profile: Jerry Crisp

Posted on Tue, Sep 21, 2021

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Jerry Crisp, Regional Maintenance Manager at LTI, Inc. in Sunnyside, Washington.
Everyday Hero (2)-1
Name: Jerry Crisp

Company: LTI, Inc.

Title: Regional Maintenance Manager

On the Job Since: 1992

Superpower: Imparting important knowledge to the team

Hometown: Yakima, WA

Favorite Movie: National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

Bucket List Destination: Going to Florida to visit my brother that I haven’t seen in 12 years, traveling through the U.S. and holing up when I find a place with 80-degree weather year-round.

For Fun: Spending time with family and friends and traveling

How and when did you start working for Lynden?
I started in Sunnyside on Dec. 2, 1992. I was informed about the mechanic position opening by a friend that worked for LTI, Inc. I was looking forward to going from a small one-man shop working 24/7 to a shop that had a crew of three others to share the workload. Then eight years later, I was in the manager position overseeing six mechanics and four wash bay techs.

What is a typical day like for you?
Very unpredictable! I don’t think a day has gone by where the day went as I planned without a hiccup at some point. But I actually think I prefer it that way – it adds variety to the day.

What has been most challenging in your career?
The most challenging is trying to be ahead of operations in getting prepared for harvest and winter-time challenges. We have equipment that sits idle until we need it for the local harvest, and then we start prepping it about a month ahead of time. Winters are very unpredictable, so you have to be ready for the worst-case scenario.

What are you most proud of in your career?
Being able to finish out my career at LTI, Inc. To put in so many years in at one company is very rewarding.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
My family consists of my siblings, two sisters and two brothers, I am second to the youngest. I think most of my childhood memories come from living in Nile River north Naches, WA. It was the best place to grow up, fishing, swimming in the river and climbing the mountains was the best you could ask for.

What was your first job?
My first job was pumping gas at Eagle Rock in Nile (now it’s called the Woodshed). Hunting season was the busy time of the year with all of the hunters coming to get gas and food. They would throw their keys at you and say fill it up and park it for me. I guess I looked older than I was then!

What would surprise most people about you?
Well, I have never been arrested, and I’m a nice guy!

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I spend most of my time thinking about work, but I see that changing in the near future.

What do you like best about your job?
It has to be the people. We have such a variety of people – office staff, drivers, mechanics, yard crew and wash bay. A lot of them are either fathers, daughters, brothers, sons, uncles or cousins to one another. It is nice to work with all of the different generations of families.

Tags: LTI Inc., Lynden Employees, Everyday Heroes

Lynden first trucking company in AK to earn SHARP awards

Posted on Fri, Sep 10, 2021

My Post - 2021-11-22T115248.641Lynden Transport employees earned the prestigious title of being the first trucking company in Alaska to earn a SHARP award (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program) from the Alaska Department of Labor Standards and Safety. The award is part of AKOSH, a program to promote safe and healthful jobs for Alaskans while recognizing employers who operate exemplary safety and health systems. Both the Anchorage and Soldotna Service Centers were assessed and found to meet or exceed OSHA's safety and health guidelines.

According to HSSE Manager Richard Hennagin, Lynden Transport has worked with the group AKOSH Consultation and Training Services for many years. "This partnership, and a strong commitment from our management and operations teams, has led to improvements in the Lynden Transport safety and health programs over the years," he explains. "Employees in all departments have shown their commitment to improving the safety and health culture. When you consider that our people have been able to do all this in the conditions we endure — weather, traffic and a pandemic — it is truly humbling."

Tags: Awards, Lynden Employees, Lynden Transport

Lynden mariners keep waters and people safe

Posted on Fri, Sep 03, 2021

Greta crew long shotLynden's captains, engineers, mates and deck hands do more than just deliver freight via barge, landing craft and tugboat. These mariners are the eyes and ears on the waters they sail, often being called upon to assist in emergency situations and to report on marine conditions for other vessels.

Just last month on the Kuskokwim River, the Bering Marine crew of the landing craft Greta pulled a man to safety after he fell off a seawall, while the crews of the Arctic Bear and Padilla assisted U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hickory with safe navigation of the river channel.

According to Brandon Leary, Alaska Marine Trucking's Bethel Service Center Manager, "I was getting ready for bed and my wife, Alyssa, actually saw the man fall in the river. I ran down with a life ring that I keep on my deck, and I had my wife alert the crew on the Greta while I assisted the man in the water." The Greta crew responded with a Jacob's ladder boarding device, then contacted emergency crews who met the tug on shore and transported the man to a local hospital.

"The City of Bethel would like to extend thanks and appreciation to the Greta crew," says Bethel City Manager Peter Williams. Police Lieutenant Jesse Poole also expressed thanks for the quick actions of the crew, which includes Captain Mike Dawson, Engineer Clint Mathews, Mates Chris Benny and Fred Haag, and Deckhands Anthony Augusto and Manny Belarmino.

"Those of us who live and work on vessels must always be prepared to expect the unexpected," says Captain Jack Rasmussen, Bering Marine Vice President. "We routinely perform safety drills so our crews know how to act and what to possibly expect during an incident. These drills are a regulatory requirement but also essential to protect our crews and equipment. We are proud of the Greta crew for their lifesaving actions in a Man Overboard (MOB) situation."

Another Bering Marine vessel was on the same river providing crucial navigation information so the U.S. Coast Guard could mark the channel with seasonal buoys. This is a yearly task as the channel changes each year.

"The Arctic Bear tug was running the river as soon as the ice went out this year," explains Port Engineer Steve Isaacs. "The crew developed a good track line by using a skiff they launch off the tug, help from locals in the area, and from Captain David Curtis on Bering Marine's pilot boat Padilla."

When the USCGC Hickory arrived in June, the crew reached out to Captain Chuck Gaffney on the Arctic Bear. He provided track lines for the 2021 channel and the location of shoals and sandbars to mark with buoys for safe navigation. In addition to Captain Gaffney, crew members include Engineer Sean Brooks and Mates Joe Pirak and Dave Smith.

Hickory Captain and Commanding Officer Jeannette Greene reached out to the crew with a thank you for the yearly assistance. "I sincerely appreciate your help with river information, soundings and shoaling each year," she writes. The Hickory crew marked buoy 28 with a small bear in appreciation of the Arctic Bear and its crew.

Tags: Bering Marine Corporation, Lynden Employees, Safety, Alaska, Ocean

Everyday Hero Profile: Gordy Lindblad

Posted on Fri, Aug 20, 2021

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Gordy Lindblad, Facilities Maintenance Manager at Alaska Marine Lines in Seattle, Washington.
Everyday Hero post
Name: Gordy Lindblad

Company: Alaska Marine Lines

Title: Facilities Maintenance Manager

On the Job Since: 2004

Superpower: Always getting the job done

Hometown: Enumclaw, WA

Favorite Movie: Tombstone

Bucket List Destination: Taking all the grandkids to Disneyland

For Fun: Golf, playing with the grandkids

How did you start working for Alaska Marine Lines?
I had worked for Crowley Maritime for 30 years when Lynden took over the rail barge operation. I was asked to help out with the transition and then was lucky enough to be hired to help with the operation in Seattle and to help the Alaska Railroad with facility changes.

What is a typical day like for you?
I take care of 17 Alaska Marine Lines and Alaska Marine Trucking facilities in Seattle and Alaska. I work with managers and teams to maintain the facilities and handle repairs. I also do work for many of the other Lynden companies as needed, whether its docks, warehouses, offices or equipment like barges or tugs. Whatever is needed, I do it! I helped build the Petersburg and Haines facilities. Depending on what’s going on, we sometimes need to work around the clock dealing with weather and other issues that come up. I live in Enumclaw, so my commute is about an hour each way.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Making sure all facilities are maintained and safely operational. It can be a challenge when you are pouring concrete in the middle of the winter in Alaska!

Over the course of my career, I’ve had some interesting things happen like an A-frame building collapsed in Whittier under the snow and we had to repair it. We pride ourselves on doing as much marine repair as possible. It is tough to find marine contractors and repairs are very expensive. Before I was with Lynden a rail barge broke in half at sea and we had to figure out how to handle it.

What are you most proud of?
Building a new facility or upgrading a facility and the appreciation of everyone that uses it.

Tell us about your growing up years.
I come from a family of three brothers. We all played football, with one of my brothers going on to play for the Denver Broncos. I went into the navy out of high school and when I came out, I went to work on tugboats. After two years of being seasick, I went to work for Crowley loading rail barges in Seattle for 28 years.

What was your first job?
I worked nights in a brick yard when I was a senior in high school. My job was to run a cutter making different sizes of clay bricks to run through the 2-block long kilns.

What would surprise people about you?
When I was a kid, I always wanted to race boats and motorcycles. I did the motorcycles, but at 65 I actually had a chance to drive a flat-bottomed race boat. I was so sore afterward I decided it was not a good idea. It was a real eye-opener. Going 140 mph was way too fast for me.

Before working for Alaska Marine Lines, I had a roofing business and warehoused for Costco when they first started out doing hot tubs. I had a 20,000-square-foot warehouse and did all deliveries and warehoused for Washington, Oregon and California. I did 4,000 hot tubs a year.

How do you spend your time away from work?
I spend most of my time with my eight grandkids. I have three girls and five boys ranging in age from 3 months old to 9. I also play golf and have an endless honey-do list. We have some property in Enumclaw, and I have been ‘asked’ to build new decks, a green house and remodel bathrooms and bedrooms in my spare time.

What do you like best about your job?
By far the people. We have the most talented and hardworking people in the industry and wonderful support from leadership. I will always be grateful for the opportunity to work with everyone here at Lynden. I really believe anything is possible with the people here. It’s a workplace environment where everyone has input, and everyone is listened to.

Tags: Lynden Employees, Everyday Heroes, AML

Everyday Hero Profile: Bob Barndt

Posted on Fri, Jul 23, 2021

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Bob Barndt, District Operations Manager at Lynden Logistics in Anchorage, Alaska.

Bob Barndt Everyday HeroName: Bob Barndt

Company: Lynden Logistics

Title: District Operations Manager

On the Job Since: 1987

Superpower: Taking care of internal and external customers

Hometown: Eagle River, AK

Favorite Movie: Tombstone

Bucket List Destination: Talladega Motor Speedway in Alabama to watch a race

For Fun: Spending time off the grid at his cabin, snow machining in winter and traveling in RV in summer

How and when did you start working for Lynden? Have you worked for or done projects with other Lynden companies?
I hired on with Lynden in 1987 at Prudhoe Bay as a foreman. Lynden was a contractor for ARCO at that time, and I was there for eight years. Over the last 34 years I have been fortunate to be able to work across all of the transportation disciplines with several Lynden companies. I spent 22 years with Lynden Air Cargo helping them get the customer base established in “Bush” Alaska, first with the Lockheed Electras and then with the Hercs. I was called upon numerous times to help out on project work, mainly in support of Lynden Logistics Services. One of the more interesting jobs I was fortunate to be part of was working in Russia for about a year on a huge oil spill cleanup project. My last four years have been working with the Lynden/UPS Projects team helping maintain our long-standing contract to move their bush packages all over the state of Alaska.

What is a typical day like for you?
These days I am working closely with our Lynden/UPS Projects team on the day-to-day challenges of moving 4,000 to 5,000 packages to over 600 zip codes and cities in Alaska. As we like to say…”Putting out Fires!” I have a great team to support me, too.

What has been most challenging in your career?
Not many that I can write about except in my early career with Lynden Air Cargo (humorous now). I was sent to St. Mary’s to help load fish on the Lockheed Electras and I had to sleep on a cot in a 20-foot CONNEX for three days. Little did I know that was the norm for working in Bush Alaska!

What are you most proud of in your career?
The many customers that I have helped over the years, both large and small. It makes me proud that I have done a good enough job that even as I transitioned from the different Lynden companies, they call me to seek out a transportation solution. See, we have the best Lynden employees in the transportation business, so it makes my job easy.

Bob Barndt at starting line with Quinn Itens Lead dogs
Bob volunteering at the Iditarod dog sled race in 2010.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I am originally from Friedens, PA, where my folks were raised. Their parents were coal miners. My father joined the Army and met my mom. I was raised the oldest of seven kids. We traveled to many bases before I joined the Navy. I spent four years as a Torpedomen’s Mate. Then I moved back to Alaska and started my new career in the Oil Patch. This is where I was hired on with Lynden.

What was your first job?
I had paper routes, mowed lawns and was a grocery bagger at the base commissary. I also had a job as a short-order cook at a local rod and gun club in Hanau, Germany. I look back at that job as being my first real paycheck job, and I would love to do it again!

What would surprise most people about you?
I actually wanted to be a professional bowler when I graduated from high school. Also, for you bowlers, my high is 299! When I met my bride and told her this, she said ‘DORK!’

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I spend my time with my bride Ann and family at our cabin snow machining in the winter and traveling in our motorhome in the summer. Being an “Off Grid” cabin owner and serving as part-time carpenter, plumber, electrician and all-around handyman is fun and actually therapy for me.

What do you like best about your job?
Absolutely 100 percent the people! There is no doubt in my mind Lynden has the best employees in this business!

Tags: Lynden Employees, Lynden Logistics, Everyday Heroes