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Bison bulls relocate to Sitkalidak Island in Alaska with Lynden's help

Posted on Tue, Dec 08, 2020

Buffalo Bulls being loaded for transportEarlier this year the Alutiiq Tribe of Old Harbor, AK was awarded three bison bulls from Yellowstone National Park to improve the genetic diversity of its Sitkalidak Bison Herd. The catch: the bison required transport from Montana to Seattle, from Seattle to Anchorage and from Anchorage to Homer Spit. The final destination required a boat ride to Sitkalidak on Kodiak Island.

"I was informed that on special occasions Lynden Transport may transport livestock," says Cynthia Berns, Vice President of Community Affairs for the Old Harbor Native Corp. "So I called Paul Friese in Anchorage."

Paul Friese, Vice President of Alaska Sales for Lynden Transport, responded to the call with the usual can-do attitude. Gathering all the details, he quickly put the team in motion. Lynden Driver Clay Bonty met the FedEx plane in Anchorage, carefully loaded the special 20-foot container containing the three bison and headed to Homer, AK. "This was a very special project," Paul says. "We were happy to be involved and assist the Alutiiq Tribe."

Buffalo Bulls on landing craft vesselThe container weighed in at 4,500 pounds, plus three bulls at 1,200 pounds each, for a total weight of 8,100 pounds. Once Clay reached Homer, the container was loaded onto a landing craft vessel bound for Sitkalidak Island, pictured right.

The transfer was a historic moment in returning Yellowstone bison to tribal lands. These particular animals are important to tribes because they are the genetically pure descendants of the bison that tribal ancestors lived with. In the case of the Sitkalidak herd, the new bulls will introduce genetic diversity for herd survival. "Our herd is managed to provide food security for our community of 230 residents and tribal members throughout the state," Cynthia explains. "In 2017, DNA testing was conducted on the herd, and it was suggested that we integrate new genes into the herd for long-term health and survival."

The bulls are settled in and doing well. They are outfitted with GPS collars that provide hourly updates on their status. "From trucks, plane and landing craft, these animals have come a long way. A huge thank you to our supporters at Lynden Transport for safely getting the bison to Homer and secured on the vessel for the last leg of their journey."

Five years ago, Lynden was involved in another bison relocation project using Lynden Air Cargo's L-100 cargo plane. Employees spent three days loading 100 wood bison into special containers in Portage, AK for truck transport to Anchorage via Alaska West Express. All 100 animals were loaded in Anchorage and delivered safely in three flights to Shageluk for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Transport, Alaska, Charters, Air, Ground, Multi-Modal, Ocean, Community

Lynden companies deliver Clinic in a Can

Posted on Wed, Dec 02, 2020

Clinic in a Can 1200x630Lynden Air Cargo delivered a mobile medical facility, called "Clinic in a Can," to Western Alaska this fall bringing much-needed medical services to the small community of Naknek. Pictured to the right, Clinic in a Can is the brainchild of a doctor who began repurposing 20-foot containers as emergency medical clinics for third-world countries. Ethan Bradford, Lynden Air Cargo's Vice President of Technical Operations, put the project together.

Alaska West Express transported the mobile clinic from Wichita, KS to Tacoma where it moved via ship to Anchorage. Lynden Air Cargo took the last leg to King Salmon's Camai Community Health Center. "Protecting workers, Alaskans and our communities during the fishing season and year-round continues to be an important challenge in our state's COVID response," explains Mary Swain, Executive Director of the Camai Health Center. "We received grant money to purchase the mobile clinic, and we can transport it to wherever it is needed most." The clinic has proven so effective, she has requested two more to serve the region. "This was a good One Lynden door-to-door move from Wichita to Naknek," says Matt Jolly, Vice President of Sales and Pricing for Alaska West Express.

In another recent project, the Lynden companies worked together to transport two oversized turbines, one from Houston, the second from Kenai, to Prudhoe Bay, AK. Lynden Logistics coordinated the transportation, which involved a charter flight on Lynden Air Cargo to Anchorage then truck delivery via Lynden Oilfield Services to two North Slope destinations.

Tags: Alaska West Express, Lynden Air Cargo, Alaska, Lynden Logistics, Multi-Modal, Community, Lynden Oilfield Services

Lynden Air Cargo welcomes N410LC

Posted on Tue, Nov 24, 2020

Lynden Air Cargo Hercules AircraftAnother L100 Hercules joined the Lynden Air Cargo fleet this fall. After a major overhaul and conformity heavy check, N410LC was delivered to Anchorage in October. "The aircraft was purchased in Africa from Safair in 2017," explains Ethan Bradford, Vice President of Technical Operations. "Our dedicated maintenance, quality control, records, contract vendors and other Lynden Air Cargo personnel have spent many thousands of hours getting it ready to serve our customers." October 8 was N410LC's functional test flight out of Singapore.

The addition of N410LC brings Lynden's fleet to 14. "We operate nine Hercules aircraft; one is a parts plane and four are on lease back to Safair," Ethan explains.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Charters, Air

Everyday Hero Profile: Kendra McPhail

Posted on Thu, Oct 22, 2020

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment.

Introducing Kendra McPhail, Customer Service Representative at Lynden Air Cargo in Anchorage, Alaska.

Everyday Hero Kendra McPhailName: Kendra McPhail

Company: Lynden Air Cargo

Title: Customer Service Representative

On the job since: 2018

Superpower: Positive force for change

Hometown: Palmer, Alaska

Favorite Movie: The Great Debaters

Bucket List Destination: Maldives

For Fun: Travel in state and outside the country, study the bible, and spend time with family and loved ones.

How did you start your career with Lynden?
I graduated from Fisk University in Nashville in 2017. I have a degree in political science, although I do not want to go into politics! After college, I thought I had a plan in place to further my education at another school in a master's program, but life doesn't always pan out the way you thought it would, so I came back home to Alaska. I applied for jobs, but they usually told me I was over-qualified or it wasn't the right fit. We had a family friend who works for the railroad and he does business with Lynden Logistics. He told me Lynden was hiring. I applied on a Sunday, got a call on a Tuesday, had an interview later that week and started the following Monday in customer service. That was where I met Carly (Fielding) and Adam (Murray). I am a firm believer in being 15 to 20 minutes early so I showed up early for my interview. I think that made a good impression.

Tell us about your job.
It's a very interesting job assisting customers every day. There are so many things that come through our door – we transport dogs, goats and horses. It's hunting season, so we have backhauls from the villages like St. Mary's. People hunt there and send the meat back to their families in Anchorage or Fairbanks. We keep the meat chilled or frozen for them.

From the time I started to now, a lot has changed. We have revamped our backhaul processes to make the system more accurate, accountable and streamlined. The changes will go a long way toward providing better service to our customers and creating efficiencies within our operation. I created a list of procedures for the backhaul process that is allowing everyone to get a better handle on it.

What is your favorite or most rewarding part of your job?
Taking on new challenges and a feeling of being able to meet that challenge to a certain degree of satisfaction. I like to not just meet challenges, but exceed challenges. I like a little competition. You are giving me a task? Don't worry. I can handle it.

I've also had the privilege of attending trade shows representing Lynden Air Cargo. We just went to one at the University of Alaska Anchorage at the student athletic center for the Native Youth Olympics. We gave out swag and told them about our services and where we fly. I also did another trade show at the Sheraton in Anchorage with other employees from Lynden companies. And I will be attending a conference on diversity with colleague Emily Taylor.

What is a typical day like?
I work 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. No day is ever the same. When I come in the door I never know what I am walking into. I like that because it keeps it interesting. I also get to interact with different operations people like the warehouse crew. When I clock in at 11, I channel what everyone is doing or where they need support. After catching up on emails, I go around and ask if there is anything that needs to be done, whether that's a flight that needs to be closed, filing, answering emails, meeting with accounting to find missing paperwork, maybe a signature is missing somewhere. Most days of the week we have almost 24-hour coverage so my coworkers work staggered shifts with me.

What has been most challenging?
In customer service, people can be tough. You will always encounter people that won't be the most pleasant. I try to let it roll off and rise to the next level. You cannot take everything personally. I've had to learn that in my role here. My tactic is to kill them with kindness and roll with the punches.

Can you tell us about your family and growing up years?
I was born in Palmer and attended Pioneer Peak Elementary and Colony Middle and High Schools. I graduated in 2013. I have a younger brother who is 19 and in college and an older sister who is 27 and working in Washington, DC. My parents still live in Palmer. Both of my parents are educators. My dad was the director of education and instruction for the district and moved on to be a principal at a school called Pace which offers an alternate educational experience for the children in the Mat-Su Borough School District. My mom is in her 21st year of teaching and is working on her PhD.

When I was in middle and high school I was a member of the track team. I ran the 400, 200 and 4x1 and 4x4 relays. In middle school I did hurdles, but not in high school. I fell a few times and decided that was it! I also participated in cross country skiing and cross country running in high school. So I ran cross country in the fall, skied in the winter and did track and field in the spring.

Besides sports, I was on the student advisory board for the curriculum counsel, so I met with the instruction department and teachers and went over the curriculum for the entire school district. I was also the student representative for the school board and attended those meetings to update them on what was happening at our high school.

What would surprise most people about you?
When I was growing up, my mom would always tell people, 'be careful, she likes to talk.' Now she is saying that my gift of gab is being used to my advantage in my job as a customer service representative.

I like to recite poetry. I took poetry classes in high school and competed in a competition called Poetry Out Loud. You memorize poems and perform them in front of judges. I recited Maya Angelous' Phenomenal Woman. I went to districts and also participated in speech competitions when I was in elementary school.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I like to be outside walking in the mountains being adventurous. I'm an adrenaline junkie. I go zip lining, go to see waterfalls and try to spend my time doing exciting things. I believe that life is short and tomorrow's not promised. I live my life to the fullest and do the things that I love. I attend New Hope Baptist Church in Anchorage and am heavily involved in choir and other activities. I also play softball in a league representing Lynden. I like to hang out with friends, go out to eat, spend time at church, listen to poetry and recite poetry. I recited a poem in January at a Martin Luther King Jr event in Anchorage.

What are your thoughts about working for Lynden Air Cargo?
I have been afforded many opportunities to grow and elevate myself by going to different trade shows and I'm finding out things that I didn't know that I really enjoy doing. I've been able to dig into the sales and marketing side of things and talk with managers about certain ideas I have to make improvements and differentiate Lynden from other companies. I really enjoy the logistics side of the business. My goal is to earn a master's degree while still at Lynden and apply those benefits to my current job. I also had an opportunity to go to fishing with co-workers and meet some of the customers I work with. I caught a lot of fish and had a chance to engage with our customers in an informal setting. Getting to know them on a personal level helped me ask questions like 'what do you think about our service and what can we do better?' It was something completely new for me and a great way to interact with the customers we serve.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Employees, Everyday Heroes

Lynden Air Cargo carries massive equipment for mine

Posted on Mon, Mar 09, 2020

My Post - 2021-11-24T131458.829"This was some of the largest and heaviest equipment ever moved by Lynden Air Cargo," says Charter Manager Dave Beach. Lynden assisted DeBeers and Priestly Demolition, Inc. in their Victor Mine decommission and remediation project by flying oversized equipment out of Timmins, Ontario, to remote sites in Canada to ease the burden on the winter ice road.

"It was a team effort due to the size and complexity of the cargo. It required multiple trips to assist in the preparation and two of our most experienced Loadmasters, Leo Lopez and Matt Hise, on the job during the 16-day project," Dave explains. "The flight crew was exceptional, completing flights in difficult fall weather conditions in northern Canada. This equipment was some of the largest we have hauled in this quantity to date. Normally there are one or two pieces required to a location. This was several pieces over 17 flights, with very little margin for error due the sheer size and weight."

Lynden has worked with DeBeers out of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories since 2006, but this is the first project outside of that yearly work. "Both DeBeers and Priestly Demolition expressed their admiration at the professionalism of Lynden's crews and operations department. "We will likely see much more work with both of these groups in the years to come," Dave says.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Canada, Mining, Oversized/Heavy Haul, Project Logistics, Air, Specialized

Spreading the word about Lynden in Ghana

Posted on Thu, Feb 06, 2020

Ghana EventJim presenting giftJim Davis, Lynden Air Cargo Vice President of Commercial Operations, joined Director of Compliance and Government Contracts Samantha Davis and Customer Service Manager Dani Myren to share Lynden Air Cargo's capabilities with representatives from the mining and construction industries and members of the U.S. Embassy in Ghana, Africa last month. Samantha Davis is pictured above with some of the attendees. Around 30 people gathered at Air Ghana's offices for an informational reception. "Coordinating an event like this in Africa was a new experience for us, and we were delighted to see such a variety of regional organizations interested in learning more about Lynden Air Cargo," says Dani. Lynden Air Cargo has a maintenance base in Accra, Ghana.

During the trip, a handmade Alaska Kuspuk was presented to one of Air Ghana's staff for her assistance to Lynden Air Cargo during a previous trip. Jim is presenting the gift to her in the photo to the right.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Mining, International, Construction

Honoring Lynden retirees

Posted on Thu, Jan 16, 2020

We would like to recognize the following Lynden employees who retired this past year. We are grateful for their service and contributions to Lynden, and we wish them well on their new adventures!

Steve McQueary – Brown Line, 40 years
Steve McQuearySteve (photo to the right) started working for Brown Line in 1979 with a short break in between to serve as an expert for U.S. Customs in the ACE Truck Manifest Program. In his 40-year career, he has been a driver, dock manager, dispatcher, general and sales manager. "As we are a small company, I also assisted in accounts payables, loaded trucks, received freight, handled insurance, cleaned the kitchen and did whatever needed to be done. I have also assisted other Lynden companies with FDA compliance," he says.

In the 1970s, truckloads of frozen salmon were packed in 100-pound boxes, halibut was shipped loose on the floor stacked like cord wood and full loads of King Crab sections were common. "I haven't seen a truckload of 100-pound salmon boxes shipped in years, it is now illegal to ship halibut on the floor, and the halibut quotas have decreased by 80 percent from what they were in the 70s," Steve says. "The value of King Crab makes it difficult for most buyers to buy a truckload."

Other changes Steve has seen in his career: freight ships on pallets and all trucks have a pallet jack. "In the 70s, everything we hauled was floor loaded and we used hand trucks. Paper log books were used for hours, drivers were more independent as there were no cell phones, and it was at their discretion to call in, much to the chagrin of the dispatchers. That world no longer exists with cell phones, satellite tracking, electronic logs and truck sensors."

Steve's most memorable project involved Trident Seafoods. "One of their overseas plants had run out of product and shut down," he recalls. "Sixty loads were sitting south of Seattle that needed to be shipped to Bellingham in a 3-day period. I had no clue on how we would cover it, but said that we would. Trident had turned around a vessel that was already at sea to return to Bellingham to pick this product up. We worked with other Lynden companies, using as many rigs as possible and saved Trident money by reducing the number of truckloads and delivering it all on time. This was a great "One Lynden" example. I took pride that Trident trusted me to get it done and that, at Lynden, nothing can stop us."

Retirement will bring home and woodworking projects, fishing, camping, golfing and touring the country with his wife in their Mustang convertible. "It's been a great career," Steve says. "I've made a lot of friends and enjoyed being a part of the Lynden family."

Cherri Webby – Lynden Transport, 32 years
Cherri WebbyCherri (photo to the right) started her career in 1987 as a Customer Service Representative in Ketchikan. "We worked for Arrowhead Transfer and were agents for Lynden Transport and Alaska Marine Lines. Lynden Transport used the highway to Prince Rupert, then the Alaska Marine Highway system to deliver freight in Southeast Alaska," she says. "Alaska Marine Lines had one weekly barge that serviced Southeast." In 2002, Cherri moved to Seattle and went to work for Alaska Marine Lines as a customer service representative, later becoming the manager of the department. Three years later, she went to work for Lynden Transport as Director of Customer Service.

"The biggest change I have seen in my career is the streamlining of our processes to move freight," she says. "From receiving the shipment, to moving the shipment from the dock to the trailer, to the customer, it has become much more efficient." Cherri's retirement plans include travel and family time.

Gary Schmahl – Lynden Air Cargo, 22 years
Gary SchmahlGary (photo to the right) began his career as an inspector with Lynden Air Cargo in 1997. He moved into Quality Control as a manager of scheduled maintenance and ended his career as a project manager. He has watched the company expand from two leased Electras to 10 L382 Hercules aircraft.

"My best memory is bringing six foreign aircraft onto the U.S. registry from 2005 to 2019," he says. "I have been the Quality Control Representative for over 130 B Checks and C Checks since 1999 in Singapore, the U.K., Canada and elsewhere." A B Check is a two-week maintenance and service check, and a C Check is a six-week heavy inspection and maintenance check," he says.

Gary's retirement plans include outdoor sports and traveling. He has a winter home in the Ozark Mountains for fishing and a home in Anchorage to enjoy the Alaska summers. "I would like to thank Lynden and all its good people and leadership for the past 22 years," he says. "There has been a lot of travel (1.5 million miles on Delta alone) and plenty of new experiences around the world. I had a lot of responsibility and all the tools to handle the tasks plus the appreciation for a job well done."

Paul Willing – Lynden Air Cargo, 20 years
Paul WillingPaul Willing (photo to the right) has been part of Lynden Air Cargo for almost 21 years, first as Director of Quality Control from 1999 to 2007 and then as Vice President of Maintenance from 2007 to 2019. In that time, he watched the company grow from an Alaskan operation to a worldwide company. "I really enjoyed the aircraft acquisitions over the years in Singapore, France and South Africa," Paul says, "and working with the dedicated and talented professionals at Lynden Air Cargo." His most memorable project was starting an airline in Papua New Guinea. Paul will start the new decade and his retirement with winter travel and spending more time sailing. "I would like to thank Lynden for the challenges and opportunities," he says.

Bob Weeks – Lynden Inc., 16 years
Bob has played an important part behind the scenes at Lynden for the past 16 years. Starting as a CPA in the Tax Department, he worked on corporate tax returns and conducted internal audits of operating companies for compliance and other issues.

The audits sometimes took months and Bob enjoyed getting to know each company's processes and talking to the people. "Alaska Marine Lines probably has the most assets in the most places of any Lynden company. Keeping track of every piece of equipment is a challenge," he says. "At the end of one particular audit, they were able to locate every asset, down to one last container at the bottom of a stack during their busy fish season."

Looking back, Bob's biggest challenge was learning the foreign tax laws necessary for setting up Lynden's new companies in Papua New Guinea and Ghana, Africa.

Retirement will bring motorhome trips with his wife, Rena, to Arizona and national parks in Utah. "I will enjoy not waking up at 5:01 a.m. every morning," he says, "but Lynden was a great company to work for."

Oksana Begej – Alaska Marine Lines, 38 years
Fish Queen. That is one of the titles Alaska Marine Lines Human Resources Director Oksana Begej listed when asked for her career information. After 38 years, she is entitled to a little fun. Oksana started her career back in 1982 when multipage invoices were typed on electric typewriters. "We went through a lot of whiteout!" she says.

Starting as Office Manager in Seattle, she moved into customer service, dispatch and finally human resources. "My best memories are the fabulous people I have worked with," she says, "and my favorite project would be skeleton entry where we didn't have to dig through piles of bills of lading to see if a shipment was received. That was a total game changer for us and our customers at the time."

Now that she is retired, Oksana plans to enjoy more time with her husband. "Alaska Marine Lines and Lynden are amazing and have provided a wonderful career for me and benefits for my family."
Bob Weeks, Oksana Begej & Eric Linde
Pictured above retirees Bob Weeks, Oksana Begej and Eric Linde

Eric Linde – Alaska Marine Lines, 24 years
Eric Linde has worked in various areas at Alaska Marine Lines during his 24 years, mostly providing leadership and management of Service Centers or Maintenance and Repair (M&R).

One of his best career memories was the Ketchikan Bypass. "We had 100 custom 20-foot containers made that could carry 100K pounds of bulk cement and other bulk products. A new forklift design was required with a lifting capacity of more than 100,000 pounds. We built and assembled transfer system conveyors and bag houses along with a tipper system that assisted in the transfer of bulk cement products from the containers to trailers on the Ketchikan end. It was a BIG job," he remembers.

Eric also commented on the changes in containers over the years. "I watched containers get bigger and heavier – from standard gauge to 10' high and 102" wide with increased gross weights. We had to increase the forklift size and carrying capacity and ability to stack them higher. Then we had new barges built to carry the larger containers and handle the increase in freight volumes. It's been amazing to see and be part of Lynden's futuristic ideas that have become the norm here at Alaska Marine Lines," he says.

Selah, WA is where Eric and his wife have decided to spend their retirement years. Their home is on acreage with a shop for Eric to enjoy his hobby of restoring antique farm tractors and agriculture equipment. "I am an avid snow and water skier, so I hope to spend more time in those activities now. We also have plans to continue to travel and see our National Parks that we have not been to yet. It's been an amazing career at Alaska Marine Lines. Thank you for the opportunity to meet and work with so many great people. I feel blessed to have been a small part of it."

Bill Merk – Alaska Marine Trucking, 28 years
Bill MerkBill (photo to the right) has been a 'jack of all trades' serving as a warehouseman, driver, customer service representative, warehouse lead, barge and yard freight operator, and, most recently, Human Resources Coordinator and HSSE Manager for the Juneau office during a career at Arrowhead Transfer from 1991 to 1997 and Alaska Marine Trucking from 1997 to 2019.

"The biggest changes I have seen in almost three decades is the ongoing development of freight managing processes and the increase in opportunities for employees to grow within the Lynden family of companies," Bill says. "I am most proud of the success of Alaska Marine Trucking's continuing safety improvements."

Bill's retirement plans include spending time with family in Portland, OR and completing his second collection of poetry. He also plans to travel and rediscover the deserts and mountains of the American Southwest. "It has been a pleasure working for a company that takes such good care of its employees; I couldn't imagine working anywhere else," he says.

Paula Daggett and Lynden teamPaula Daggett - Alaska Marine Trucking, 28 years
Paula Daggett (photo to the right) retired from Alaska Marine Trucking in September after 28 years as a Customer Service Representative in Ketchikan. She is pictured with other members of the Lynden team at her retirement celebration. From left: Dan Kelly, Paula, Adam Anderson, Paul Haavig, Alaska Marine Lines President Kevin Anderson and Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.

Senior Aircraft Records Specialist Pat Logan and Director of Quality Control Jeff Pull also retired from Lynden Air Cargo in December with 18 and 17 years of service respectively.

Tags: Lynden, Alaska Marine Trucking, Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Employees, Lynden Transport, Brown Line, AML

Lynden Air Cargo assists World Food Programme

Posted on Tue, Jan 14, 2020

World Food Program Africa projectThe United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) asked Lynden to fly its L-382 aircraft to the Central African Republic (C.A.R.) to assist after violent clashes between two armed groups left many dead and injured. Over a two-week period, Lynden Air Cargo crews made 18 trips to deliver 600,000 pounds of food, shelter and vehicles to 25,000 displaced people in Birao.

"This work was very special as our crews volunteered to go and rallied to get it done while showing compassion for the humanitarian efforts going on in this region," explains Jim Davis, Vice President of Commercial Operations. "We received the initial request from the WFP to fly six trips in the C.A.R. which is a country in Africa that we had yet to operate in. Our aircraft based in Accra, Ghana, was ready to respond to the request." After the six trips, the WFP immediately requested 12 additional flights. This was not the normal cargo Lynden moves, but critical supplies going to a refugee camp so remote that very few aircraft types can operate on the runway.

"We have the best crews in the world, no question. This project gave us all a great sense of pride in what our company does around the world," Jim adds. "To see the hands-on efforts and genuine enthusiasm for the work the crew accomplished was heartwarming."

Most employees stayed well past their scheduled duty days to see the project completed despite weather delays that extended beyond the original departure date. "It truly was a humbling experience volunteering for this work," says Captain Kyle Zerkel.

"This crew embodies the Lynden Everyday Hero spirit in parts of the world we never imagined we would serve when we started the company over two decades ago," Jim says. "Thanks to the following employees for their efforts during this campaign: Aleksey Alekseyev, Bill Kenney, Philip Ansley, Kenny Horwood, Milton Beaver, Leso Tshimologo, Rock Molanga and Kyle Zerkel."

"We could tell that the Lynden Air Cargo pilots and ground staff were driven by the humanitarian cause. They were experienced with the challenging environment and their knowledge of the French language was a big plus in communicating with the local staff. Thank you for the excellent effort," says Sandra Legg, WFP Representative in Bangui, C.A.R.Lynden Air Cargo World Food Program project

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Disaster Relief, Lynden Employees, Charters, Air, Specialized, Community

Lynden Air Cargo upgrades fleet for increased reliability and performance

Posted on Fri, Oct 04, 2019

Lynden Air CargoLynden Air Cargo completed another Hercules modification this summer, installing a "Short-POD APU" to enhance the reliability and performance of its aircraft. According to Lynden Air Cargo President Rick Zerkel, the size of the project required Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval.Lynden Air Cargo APU

"It took about a year and thousands of hours to take the military data and convert it to an FAA-approved package, conform the kits, convert an existing Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), modify the airframe, install and test, then compile and finalize over 1,000 pages of reports and manuals," Rick explains. The project required support from multiple groups inside and outside Lynden Air Cargo, such as the staff from the FAA Aircraft Certification Office, engineering representatives, personnel from Lockheed and Kellstrom Defense, KF Aerospace and Lynden Air Cargo's Quality control team, engineering, publications, maintenance and special projects.

The upgrade kit provides aircraft operators with increased reliability, quicker engine starts, and reduced maintenance and operating costs by replacing the out-of-production gas turbine compressor/air turbine motor with a modified APU that will help standardize the fleet with the other APU-equipped aircraft.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Air, Specialized

Everyday Hero profile: Ethan Bradford

Posted on Sun, Sep 22, 2019

Lynden is recognizing employees who make a difference every day on the job and demonstrate our core values, Lynden's very own everyday heroes! Employees are nominated by managers and supervisors from all roles within the Lynden family of companies. Learn more about the people behind your shipment. 

Introducing Ethan Bradford, Technical Services Manager at Lynden Air Cargo in Anchorage.

Name: Ethan BradfordEveryday Hero Ethan Bradford

Company: Lynden Air Cargo, 22 years

Title: Technical Services Manager

Hometown: Anchorage, AK

Favorite Movie: Back to the Future

Bucket list destination: Space

For fun: Flying, photography, building a new home

Superpower: Solving the challenges encountered each day in airline operations and searching for new global opportunities. Ethan is pictured in his field office in Papua New Guinea at the startup of Lynden Air Cargo’s project there in 2012.

How did you get your start at Lynden?
I started as an airline startup consultant in December of 1996, then became an employee in January 1997. My positions have included airline certification consultant, then chief inspector (a required position for airline operations). I have maintained the position of Technical Services most of my career at Lynden Air Cargo.

What is your favorite or most rewarding part of your job?
Solving the challenges and opportunities we encounter each day in our airline operations and expanding the business.

What has been most challenging in your career so far?
Establishing a business and airline in Papua New Guinea. Once we were immersed into the culture and mindset of this developing country it became easier.

Most memorable project?
Acquisition of aircraft serial number 5225. It involved a long path of twists and turns in foreign places before we were able to acquire this young aircraft.

What changes have you seen over the years?
We started out only operating in Alaska with a very simple infrastructure and level of sophistication. We have grown into a mature, more complex global operation that involves thousands of different challenges and opportunities to meet and solve every day. The uniquely experienced and dedicated people that work for Lynden Air Cargo are the key to our success in overcoming these challenges we encounter. We have come a long way from startup and we will continue to grow and learn to meet our customer’s needs, and do it safely and efficiently every day.

You have been singled out for being an expert at startups. Do you consider yourself skilled at getting programs off the ground?
Yes, I thrive on exploring new ground that provides Lynden Air Cargo opportunities for growth, but not without the team of professionals that work at Lynden Air Cargo that make it happen in the end and deliver to the customer.

Can you tell us about your family?
I just celebrated 35 years with my lovely wife, Lori. We have two grown children, Nicholas and McKenzie. My wife’s life’s work has been dedicated to teaching. She recently retired from the Anchorage School District after 27 years of running a top dance program. Her biggest gratification in her work is seeing the 17,000 some students who have moved on in life to become mature and productive adults in our world. Our son, Nicholas, who worked in the film and photography business in Alaska, went on to finish his degree and is now working on his passion producing human interest documentaries in Hollywood. Our daughter, McKenzie, graduated this last spring with her Masters in Environmental Science and Management from UCSB Bren School. Her passion is to solve the world’s challenge of giving everyone access to clean water for better health and growth, of which we take for granted. It all started after a trip to a village in Cameroon for a water project, learning how disadvantaged many people are. We are proud of them and know they will do well in our world.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
Well, we bought a lot on the hillside in South Anchorage and started building a house, which has become my hobby. It started with my father-in-law, who is an architect, handing his daughter plans to a unique and modern home design. My wife handed the plans to me to build it. We have built it ourselves, out of pocket, and with many unique challenges and opportunities along the way. It has been a rewarding experience. Besides that, I love to explore and share the world with my family. When I have had the time, I love to fly, which is how it all started. My dad taught me how to fly when I was 15. I’ve been glued to aviation ever since.

You have taken many great Lynden photos over the years. Is photography a hobby as well?
I have always loved curating the images of life, of work, and of family. I have over 100,000 photos in my iPhoto library!

What would surprise people about you?
That I can’t dance even though I married a dance teacher!

What are your thoughts about working for Lynden and being a part of Lynden Air Cargo?
I can’t think of enough words to describe how honored and blessed I feel to work for such a great company, more importantly, the people that make it a family company, and that starts from the top. It is the people of Lynden that makes Lynden who we are as a company. Each one of us contributes to the success and purpose of why we do what we do every day. We do it with passion, we do it efficiently, we do it safely, we do it for the customer, internal or external – we do it every day because that is what we do. I am proud to work for the Lynden family of companies.

Tags: Lynden Air Cargo, Lynden Employees, Everyday Heroes