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Lynden companies carry ceremonial totem pole to Hoonah, AK

Posted on Thu, Jun 16, 2016

Totem_Pole_with_three_carvers_in_Hoonah.jpgAlaska Marine Lines and LTI, Inc. donated the transportation of a ceremonial totem pole from Bellingham, WA to Hoonah, AK for a June 4 dedication in the Tlingit village. Carved by Scott Jensen, Jeff Skaflestad and Fred Fulmer at Jensen's Bellingham studio, the totem was requested by elders of the Chookaneidee Clan to replace an ancestral totem pole that, according to legend, served as a source of wisdom, protection and direction for the clan's shaman when the clan was located at Glacier Bay, AK.

The advance of the "Little Ice Age" between 1300-1870 drove the Tlingit out of Glacier Bay. The pole remained and was eventually enveloped in ice.  "After Glacier Bay was designated a national park, the clan was not allowed to return to their homeland," explains Master Carver Scott Jensen. "The clan relocated in Hoonah and, years later, the totem reappeared in the creek there.  Although the pole is now gone, the clan elders have wanted to replace it for generations."

Skaflestad relocated from Hoonah to Bellingham and Fulmer from Juneau to help Jensen carve the totem in his studio. After five months of work, the totem was finished and ready to begin its journey to Hoonah. Jensen called Lynden for help.

The Alaska Marine Lines team arrived at Jensen's Bellingham studio in May to pick up the 11-foot, 2,000-pound totem, which is considered both a clan and shaman pole. The crated totem pole was secured on a trailer for the ride to Lynden, WA where LTI, Inc.'s Tom Rainey used a forklift to carefully place it into a container for the ride to Seattle and transfer onto the barge for the journey to Southeast Alaska. In Petersburg, AK, the pole was transferred barge to barge for the final leg to Hoonah. "As a company serving Alaska for over 60 years, Lynden is proud to provide the transportation to bring this important ancestral piece back to Hoonah," says Executive Vice President Alex McKallor.Totem_Pole_in_shop.jpg

Although the elders who requested the new totem passed away before the dedication in June, the carvers say the ceremony was very moving. "We felt the presence of our ancestors," says Skaflestad who is part Tlingit. "There were many tears as we placed the totem pole in its ceremonial location in the creek. It was a proud moment of unification for all of us."  

"We feel very blessed to have Lynden's support in this project," Jensen says. "Each member of the Lynden team took great care in making sure the totem was safe and secure along its journey."

 

 

Tags: LTI Inc., Alaska Marine Lines, Southeast Alaska, Alaska, totem pole

Scheuerle trailer expands heavy haul capabilities

Posted on Wed, Jun 08, 2016

Scheurle_Trailer_with_Mod_E_in_transit_on_Dalton_Hwy.jpgLynden companies are known for providing customers with the latest, most versatile equipment and a hydraulic platform trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year is proving to be useful for a variety of projects in Alaska. Manufactured by German company Scheuerle, the trailer is built to handle long and heavy loads. According to Alaska West Express President Scott Hicks, the trailer carries the weight over instead of between the axles, requiring less steel to support the load and increasing payload.

The trailer was a keystone of Alaska West Express’ recent pipeline project in Alaska (see photo above) and has greatly increased heavy haul capabilities. “Besides the 100-ton payload, the manufacturer provides a program to determine estimated axle weights for permitting,” says Steve Willford, Project Manager. By inputting load data, the program calculates the projected load distribution on the axles. This data can then be submitted to DOT for overweight permits. The program has proven extremely accurate and saves valuable employee time as well as reducing liability.  

"The trailer hydraulic readings and the program have increased our capability to forecast and increases our confidence that we are exactly within limits for road and bridge crossings with our loads,” Scott says. Alaska West Express drivers and shop and maintenance employees participated in a three-day training program to learn the specialized features of the trailer once it arrived last year. The first load it carried was a survey boat 83 feet long and 23 feet wide from Prudhoe Bay to Anchorage.

Tags: Heavy Haul, Alaska West Express, Alaska, Lynden Capabilities

Multi-modal project supports pipeline pump station

Posted on Fri, Jun 03, 2016

Alaska West Express and Alaska Marine Lines recently completed a nine-month multimodal move of pipe skids and other freight for an oil pipeline customer. Thirty loads originated at a manufacturer in Bellingham, WA and required marine and surface moves for final delivery to Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station #5 between Deadhorse and Valdez.  The pump station is an important relief station to slow the flow of oil as it descends from the Brooks Valley.

“This project began as a smaller move last summer and it continued to develop as the customer learned of our heavy haul and other capabilities,” says Steve Willford, Alaska West Express Project Manager in Fairbanks.

The project included three oversized loads which required transfer to a shuttle barge in Bellingham (see above) and on to the mainline barge in Seattle for eventual delivery to Whittier and Valdez. “They were odd-ball pieces, over-dimensional and overweight – not easy to move over the road,” Steve says.  Once they arrived in Valdez, Alaska West Express drivers Casey King, Andrew Wessels, Gary Ridall and Scott Vaughan (driving push truck) took over the delivery to the pump station. Jack Binder was the load supervisor for the Valdez shipments. Other loads arrived in Anchorage before the sailings stopped for the winter and were delivered by drivers Ken Seipel, Brian Ambrose and Del Shagen.  

Lynden is known for getting the job done and providing extra servicMod_C_Valdez_6.jpges when needed.  The final loads were delivered to the site when the installation contractor was on winter shutdown, so Alaska West Express arranged a jacking crew for unloading. Through careful coordination and planning, the arrival of the final loads was synchronized with the arrival of the jacking crew. “When we pulled away from the site, the loads were up off the ground where the customer wanted them. We were happy to provide literally everything they required,” says Jack.

Good weather helped the project stay on track as well as a new Scheuerle hydraulic highway trailer acquired by Alaska West Express last year. The trailer is capable of carrying 100 tons and was put to work carrying the 84-ton back-pressure module between Valdez and the pump station. But the real key to the project’s success, according to Steve, was teamwork between Alaska West Express operations in Tacoma, Anchorage and Fairbanks and Alaska Marine Lines crews handling the barge moves in Seattle, Bellingham and Anchorage. “Our joint capabilities and smooth working relationships really came together to provide our customer with a seamless, door-to-door transportation package.”

Tags: Alaska West Express, Alaska Marine Lines, Alaska, Trans-Alaska Pipeline

Lynden Air Cargo receives 14th consecutive AACA Safety Award

Posted on Wed, Jun 01, 2016

AACA_Safety_Award_-_Michelle_Fabry_LAC.jpgMichelle Fabry, Lynden Air Cargo’s Director of Safety, accepted the Alaska Air Carriers Association (AACA) Safety Award from Director John Duncan of the Federal Aviation Administration at the February award luncheon in Anchorage.  With the 2015 award, Lynden has received 14 consecutive safety awards which are presented to incident and accident-free carriers each year.

“We are very proud of our safety record,” Michelle says. “It all goes back to our employees and their dedication to safety in the operation of our aircraft, maintenance, cargo handling and following established procedures.”

Also in February, Lynden Air Cargo received news that it is the only carrier in the nation to receive approval of its Safety Management System Implementation Plan (SMSIP) on first submission to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Implementation Plan details how Lynden will meet the FAA’s regulatory requirements. “We’ve been working on SMS Implementation for over three years. At the time of submittal, we showed that our plan was 80 percent complete with full implementation scheduled for the end of 2016,” Michelle explains.

A team of department managers from operations, cargo services and maintenance worked together to develop the plan which included going through every FAA line item and detailing how Lynden would meet the requirement. According to Michelle, carriers who do not receive initial approval receive a visit from a team of FAA officials to help them finish the plan correctly. “This is a big deal for us. We have a great group here that got it right the first time.” Full implementation of the SMSIP is not required until 2018, so Lynden is not only ahead of schedule but setting the bar for other carriers.

Tags: Lynden, Lynden Air Cargo, Safety, Safety Award, Award

Lynden International sends classics across the pond

Posted on Wed, Jun 01, 2016

Gas tank drained. Check. Battery cables tied back. Check. Original Bill of Sale and shipper photo ID. Check.

After 18 years at Lynden International and countless global shipments, International Agent Colleen Delaney knows what is needed to ship just about anything overseas. Automobiles have become her specialty over the past few years as she handles the safe ocean transport of vintage automobiles from the U.S. to the U.K. for London-based American Legends, LLC. “We don’t typically ship vehicles, due to the extensive paperwork and customs requirements, but we will handle this type of shipment for customers who approach us with these special requests,” she says. So far, Colleen has handled the transport of Corvettes, Mustangs, Ferraris, a 1965 Buick Riviera and she is preparing to ship over a Trans-Am from the Smokey and the Bandit film and a replica of the General Lee, a 1969 Dodge Charger from the TV show The Dukes of Hazzard.

When it comes to loading and securing the valuable automobiles into containers Lynden turns to trusted partner SeaPac Transportation Services of Seattle. “We use SeaPac for all our ‘special needs and delicate handling’ FCL shipments,” Colleen says. President Paul Kimball was Lynden Transport’s Vice President of Administration in the 1970s and understands the Lynden brand of customer service and excellence. In addition to cars, engines and other specialty parts are palletized and shipped via ocean for the company. “SeaPac is the best of the beColleen__Jack_best_pic.jpgst in this area. We won’t partner with just any company – we require top notch service to keep our customers happy,” Colleen explains.

The export of vehicles requires an extensive amount of paperwork. The original title and Bill of Sale is required by customs to prevent stolen freight. Customs filing must also be presented 72 hours prior to the sailing of the vessel so that the vehicle is available for inspection by customs if they so choose. “Lynden International offers this premium service at reasonable prices compared to other forwarders,” Colleen says.

Most of the classics that Lynden ships for American Legends are headed to auctions in London or are sold to car collectors throughout Europe.

Tags: Lynden International, international shipping, Lynden, Lynden Transport

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